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  1. #11
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    I wonder if there is some correlation between MBTI and alzheimer's.

  2. #12
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    If it isn't tied to me/vital for functioning, you can just about guarantee I won't find it for months. Truth is I don't even know why I bother with possessions at all, lol. I'm most happiest when I only have a few possessions to manage, lol.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

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  3. #13
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    Alzheimers involves short term memory loss, but increased awareness of ones long term memory, and seems to be connected to not exercising the brain with new stimulation, such as reading, learning, doing puzzles, and meeting new people. A good friend of mine has a dad with Alzheimers and he swears its because it was because his dad was such a boring, stilted person who didn't engage much with hobbies, learning or the world much in general, but especially after age 60. This is anecdotal but then if you research Alzheimers there's a correlation between people with more active brains and prevention or at least postponement of Alzheimers.

  4. #14
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loki View Post
    I wonder if there is some correlation between MBTI and alzheimer's.
    Actually, when they do any sort of testing for Alzheimer's, they are supposed to take in account any predisposition for absent mindness.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  5. #15
    Senior Member SubtleFighter's Avatar
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    When I lived with my mom and sister (ISFP and ESFP), if I couldn't find something in like 3 minutes, I would just ask them to find it. They would look over the same place I was looking and find it within 20 seconds. Whereas if I would have kept looking myself, it would have taken me like 20 minutes. I wonder how I'll find things now that I'm living on my own.
    "Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear."--Ambrose Redmoon

    . . . metamorphosing . . .

  6. #16
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    This is why I hate shopping. I don't lose too many things, though, because I am consistent about putting things back in the same place when they are done, or in some logical place calculated to minimize this possibility. For instance, I put everything I need to take with me in the morning on the kitchen table so I see it at breakfast, and won't forget anything.
    Yeah, you've got to have a system, like a specific place to put your keys and you must force yourself to put them there every time, without fail - or else you waste your life away endlessly looking for them

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    Alzheimers involves short term memory loss, but increased awareness of ones long term memory, and seems to be connected to not exercising the brain with new stimulation, such as reading, learning, doing puzzles, and meeting new people. A good friend of mine has a dad with Alzheimers and he swears its because it was because his dad was such a boring, stilted person who didn't engage much with hobbies, learning or the world much in general, but especially after age 60. This is anecdotal but then if you research Alzheimers there's a correlation between people with more active brains and prevention or at least postponement of Alzheimers.
    I heard this, but I've also heard that highly intelligent people are over-represented amongst Alzheimers sufferers too. The father of a family friend has it and he was a well read and very intelligent man (and did things like crosswords a lot). It's really sad.
    INFP 4w5 so/sp

    I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas;
    they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

    - Emily Bronte

  7. #17
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    This is one of my problems. I seem to do a lot of interaction with my environment unconsciously. In particular, I put things down somewhere strange and I don't register it; then I have to search all over the house for it. However, the main reason I find it annoying is because it happens so often. It's also rather embarrassing when you spent ages looking for something in a shop and then finally ask the assistant where it is, only to discover it's right in front of your eyes.

    I do have to consciously over-compensate for my sensotard vision. Like when I'm driving, I will look twice as much at an intersection because I'm terrified that I will miss something. I fear that I will eventually come to a sticky end because of it.
    Quote 'cause I relate. All true for me... I'm an awful driver because of it. I don't see signs until it's too late... and it's all so overwhelming to me.
    I've been notorious for losing little things since I was a kid because I placed them somewhere absentmindedly. I also do the "not seeing what's right in front of my face" thing when shopping.

    I'm mainly aware of environment in an atmospheric way, where my mood is affected, as if I absorb is semi-consciously. I can be really enchanted by an environment though, and then details seem sort of luminous & I'm drawn into them, slightly hypnotized or intoxicated by them. I think this is tertiary Si with some Ne flavor...like objects take on a magical feel and emit meaning.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  8. #18
    Señora Member Elfa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Great One View Post
    I have almost no awareness of my outer surroundings at all. One pet peeve of mine is to lose an object and then have to search for it. I really have to make a strong conscious effort to be very aware of my surroundings in these types of situations, so I hate it. Do any of the other N's on the forum feel this way?
    I hate it, I hate it, I hate it!

    It's very hard for me to find stuff. Sometimes I'm looking for something that's in front of me or in my hands, and I don't notice it's there.

    My mom and best friend usually mock me about it (both ISFPs). My mom has a apparently messy house, but she knows where is everything she has.
    My ENTJ dad has a hard time looking for stuff too (he's mocked about that too), and he's always finding "better ways" to organize everything in our house, so he keeps changing where he puts stuff without telling me. So it's even harder for me to find stuff around here - that adding to my usual lack of awareness of my surroundings.

    Frequently people want to comment with me about something that happened next to us, and I'm: "What? What happened? Where? When? What...?"

  9. #19
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    im pretty good at remembering where i put things, since i put them in places where its logical for them to be(logical from the perspective i am while putting it there, also i tend to put things back where i took them(for example i can tell where nearly all my spices are in about 3 cm accuracy in my spice cabinet, because i put them back exactly where i took them when using them), and i have really good episodic memory(remembering times, places, associated emotions, and other contextual knowledge), so i remember usually quite exactly where i was when i put my camera down last time(what room, what part of the room etc i was in when putting it down) and by going there i can easily notice where the item is, since its in a place that makes sense where im standing now). however, sometimes i might not remember where something is(if i have placed it somewhere without thinking about it, i put it in somewhere where it shouldnt be long time ago or am searching for scissors at mates apartment for example) and i often REALLY suck at finding things which are in unknown/illogical place. finding those things is also very frustrating and i get really annoyed fast if i dont find it fast, or have looked all over twice and simply cant find something, because my eyes simply didnt register the item when i was looking at where it is.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
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  10. #20
    . Blank's Avatar
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    I relate with most of the N's about not being able to find things in my outer surroundings--even if they're right in front of me.

    After sixth grade, when I had a horrible habit of forgetting the keys to the house at home, I pretty much forced myself to develop a system to get everything down. Before I would walk out of the door, I would pat myself down to make sure I had everything. Keys in left pocket? Pens, pencils in right? Wallet? Check. Good to go. When I deviate from the system or when I switch things up, I often screw things up.

    The absolute worst for me is when I absent-mindedly set something down that's in-between places so that I don't keep walking around with it. Example: If I'm going running, I'll set my water bottle on a shelf/ledge or table, keep walking to let the dog outside, come back to go running, and forget where I'd just set my bottle. It'll sidetrack me for a minute or two, but that's with something I knew I'd JUST had. I could potentially lose something for days if I'm not paying attention. (I remember one time it took me a half-hour to find the remote control since I'd left it in the kitchen when I made lunch. I mean, wtf, why did I bring the remote into the kitchen?)
    Ti = 19 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Te = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Ne = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Fi = 15 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
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    -----------------
    Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly;
    Man got to sit and wonder why, why, why;
    Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land;
    Man got to tell himself he understand

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