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  1. #1
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Default Doesn't The MBTI and JCF Apply To The Real World?

    This is kind of like a poll question without a poll. I would like to know how many people on this forum just like to talk about psychology without practicing it.

    I've always been a practical S/N combo who likes to practice what he preaches. I've spent hundreds if not thousands of hours discussing theory, but believe me it's not all from the armchair or computer chair. So I am rather shocked when I point out to someone a clear example of inferior projection in the real world, only to be made to feel like none of this applies to the real world and that I, suspiciously, have an ulterior motive. As if all I am capable of is ulterior motives and psychobabbling into a computer.

    I can view this suspicious nature as a matter of type. But instead of playing that game, I just want to know:

    What's this shit for if not to put to good use in the world?
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  2. #2
    libtard SJW chickpea's Avatar
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    yes, it can apply to the real world. no, it doesn't apply to every single human emotion or behavior. being jealous in a relationship doesn't have anything to do with inferior projection or any of the functions, any type is capable of it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chana View Post
    yes, it can apply to the real world. no, it doesn't apply to every single human emotion or behavior. being jealous in a relationship doesn't have anything to do with inferior projection or any of the functions, any type is capable of it.
    By itself, jealousy is not an indicator of type. It Just So Happens that my own dad was a very, very jealous TYPE, and he was an ISFJ. Or ISXJ, since it kind of depended on the environment he was in. So I'm still talking about a type, and not an isolated instance of being jealous. Just the same, I'm not the alcoholic type, but I would certainly be capable of driving drunk if I wanted to.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  4. #4
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    I thought think was going to be about typing inanimate objects. That sounds like more fun:

    Rocks Intj
    Jello Isfp
    Spiderweb Ne
    Rainbows NF
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  5. #5
    Senior Member pinkgraffiti's Avatar
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    lol i love you. are you sure you're not an enfp?
    (ps. why is jello isfp?)

    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    I thought think was going to be about typing inanimate objects. That sounds like more fun:

    Rocks Intj
    Jello Isfp
    Spiderweb Ne
    Rainbows NF

  6. #6
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    I thought think was going to be about typing inanimate objects. That sounds like more fun:

    Rocks Intj
    Jello Isfp
    Spiderweb Ne
    Rainbows NF
    So it's a game? I did not know that.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  7. #7
    a scream in a vortex nanook's Avatar
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    well, the concept of cognitive functions is extremely helpful in differentiating one's theory of mind. in combination with vision logic, which is the ability to differentiate stages of the developemet of cognitive complexity (the ability to handle diverse perspectives), it's a superpower. (vision logic is itself a product of development of cognitive complexity and in my opinion it's requirement for understanding typology in a way, that is not a mere conceptual hallucination, but synched with the "territory")

    but many young "typologists" go over the top in assuming that whole typological concepts are in operation in a person, just because they see one aspect of it occurring, one fragment of a pattern of a function that correlates with the concept, and so on.... they never really test their theories as a whole, they don't test the big picture of it - just because the theories works in one case doesn't mean it's generally accurate.... bottom-line: don't apply your "typology", if your mind suffers from conceptual arrogance - which has been a stage in the development of typological understanding of everyone i have witnessed, including myself (and we never know when the arrogance is gone, we can just tell it's decreasing) - the pattern is usually: the better the typologist, the less frequent his use of typological lingo, while discussing someone's interiors. there are often more flexible and abstract ways of pointing something out.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nanook View Post
    well, the concept of cognitive functions is extremely helpful in differentiating one's theory of mind. in combination with vision logic, which is the ability to differentiate stages of the developemet of cognitive complexity (the ability to handle diverse perspectives), it's a superpower. (vision logic is itself a product of development of cognitive complexity and in my opinion it's requirement for understanding typology in a way, that is not a mere conceptual hallucination, but synched with the "territory")

    but many young "typologists" go over the top in assuming that whole typological concepts are in operation in a person, just because they see one aspect of it occurring, one fragment of a pattern of a function that correlates with the concept, and so on.... they never really test their theories as a whole, they don't test the big picture of it - just because the theories works in one case doesn't mean it's generally accurate.... bottom-line: don't apply your "typology", if your mind suffers from conceptual arrogance - which has been a stage in the development of typological understanding of everyone i have witnessed, including myself (and we never know when the arrogance is gone, we can just tell it's decreasing) - the pattern is usually: the better the typologist, the less frequent his use of typological lingo, while discussing someone's interiors. there are often more flexible and abstract ways of pointing something out.
    It's true, I don't need typology to talk about projection and jealousy. But the question remains: does JCF always apply? They are cognitive functions, and apparently cognition can't function without them; therefore they apply to each and every cognition (namely, a thought-process concerned with determining the relationship of two or more identities). So in a person experiencing jealousy, somewhere along the line a conclusion has been drawn which constitutes a cognition.

    The point is not that this person is therefore a jealous type or any type, but that this conclusion was created through function interaction. In the situation I'm referring to, the interaction of dominant Si with inferior Ne is a process known as inferior projection in which the jealous person's traits are instead imagined as belonging to a second party in an accusatory way.

    I watched my own mom and dad go through this for years. I just didn't know what it was at the time.

    I don't think it's typological arrogance all the time, but a rigid reliance or dependence on typological formulas which have become reductive and eventually arrogant. My best personal results with psychology have come from other concepts, such as introjection and displacement.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  9. #9
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkgraffiti View Post
    lol i love you. are you sure you're not an enfp?
    (ps. why is jello isfp?)
    Jello is isfp because it is quiet, it sits there, it is sweet, it gives in under pressure, um... it melts in your mouth? Pretty sure I'm intj, but thanx!

    @mal to unlock the "usefulness" of typology ask an Ne dom. they tend to subconsciously internalize the associations made in typology in order to read people or "orchestrate" a room. Also, do not take it so -literally- there is no little room marked "Ti" inside of a person's head that makes them logical for example. The skills of the various functions are more than likely distributed among multiple areas and are not always "innate"
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  10. #10
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    as a way to understand the real world - sure, even if its a fallacy to objectify the functions, the conceptual terminology is still useful to understand personal and social dynamics.
    but i am not so sure it would be viable to communicate about in real life - i don't know anyone who knows about it in israel - and even in canada it was pretty rare, really only my exwife and maybe my aunt-in-law. also it would be difficult to communicate without explaining about the theory, because the terminology doesn't fit the common use of the same words. i would say it might be best to keep it at a basic verbal level, a.k.a. don't say "you have a strong Ne", say "so you like exploring a lot of possibilities and making connections in different directions"...

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