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Thread: Stereotyping

  1. #11
    Occasional Member Evan's Avatar
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    Stereotyping happens in the typological sense when people confuse preference and ability.

  2. #12
    morose bourgeoisie
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    Typology becomes a stereotype when it is used form an outside perspective rather than an internal one. It can be used for personal growth, just like astrology can, but in a place like this, that's not the focus.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mal12345 View Post
    I went looking for the most innocuous definition of "stereotype" possible, and found this: "A stereotype is used to categorize a group of people." (That's not a proper definition, but then, UrbanDictionary is not a proper dictionary.)
    Your inquiry for people to define "stereotyping" was a good one.

    If your provided definition isn't what people who bemoan stereotyping are actually using, and if you're using that definition, then you're not actually getting at why people view stereotyping as "bad" because you don't even mean the same thing by the word "stereotype."

    That is, if the 'discontents' view it as "oversimplification" (presumably 'bad' by definition), and you view it as merely "simplification" (not necessarily bad in and of itself), then you'll just talk past one another.

    Everyone would ideally use the same terms so that communication is clearer. But, apparently, language doesn't work that way.


    For clarity, I'd imagine that the question should be as follows--to what extent is simplification "bad"? Why do some view low levels of simplification as "bad," and why don't others?

    Of course, this assumes that the goal is to actually get the question answered more completely...

    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    Stereotyping happens in the typological sense when people confuse preference and ability.
    Quote Originally Posted by nebbykoo View Post
    Typology becomes a steroetype when it is used form an outside perspective rather than an internal one. It can be used for personal growth, just like astrology can, but in a place like this, that'snot the focus.
    +1 to both of these

  4. #14
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mal12345 View Post
    Can someone please explain to me where the stereotyping occurs in the MBTI? Or the Enneagram for that matter? At least define "stereotyping."

    • To give a fixed, unvarying form to.
    • An idea, trait, convention, etc., that has grown stale through fixed usage.


    Enneagram 8's are bullies.
    Enneagram 4's are special snowflakes.

    S's can't see the big picture.
    N's don't deal with details.
    T's are unemotional robots.
    F's are emotional bunnies.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    Your inquiry for people to define "stereotyping" was a good one.

    If your provided definition isn't what people who bemoan stereotyping are actually using, and if you're using that definition, then you're not actually getting at why people view stereotyping as "bad" because you don't even mean the same thing by the word "stereotype."

    That is, if the 'discontents' view it as "oversimplification" (presumably 'bad' by definition), and you view it as merely "simplification" (not necessarily bad in and of itself), then you'll just talk past one another.

    Everyone would ideally use the same terms so that communication is clearer. But, apparently, language doesn't work that way.


    For clarity, I'd imagine that the question should be as follows--to what extent is simplification "bad"? Why do some view low levels of simplification as "bad," and why don't others?

    Of course, this assumes that the goal is to actually get the question answered more completely...




    +1 to both of these
    +1 to me for adding the obvious point that simplification is the best way to arrive at your type. As for oversimplification - I don't see it happening much if at all.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  6. #16
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nebbykoo View Post
    Typology becomes a stereotype when it is used form an outside perspective rather than an internal one. It can be used for personal growth, just like astrology can, but in a place like this, that's not the focus.
    How is astrology used for personal growth?
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mal12345 View Post
    +1 to me for adding the obvious point that simplification is the best way to arrive at your type. As for oversimplification - I don't see it happening much if at all.
    Great. Now we're avoiding the use of ambiguous words and can actually discuss something.

    "don't see it happening" where? On this forum? In MBTI workforce development? In clinical practice? In general?

    If you mean the forum, I'm sure that someone can provide links to one of many 15+ page threads where people try to bend typology to explain inane details. The claim of overgeneralizing could use some good, solid evidence so that we can put the issue to rest once and for all.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    Great. Now we're avoiding the use of ambiguous words and can actually discuss something.

    "don't see it happening" where? On this forum? In MBTI workforce development? In clinical practice? In general?

    If you mean the forum,
    Just the forums. My workplace has no need for typology.

    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    I'm sure that someone can provide links to one of many 15+ page threads where people try to bend typology to explain inane details. The claim of overgeneralizing could use some good, solid evidence so that we can put the issue to rest once and for all.
    I'm sure I've been stereotyped according to my INTP type on a number of occasions here by some of the more vulgar forum members. And it wasn't an eye for an eye since I have no interest in using their inane or immature forms of reasoning.

    An example from 15+ pages of a thread is something I'd be interested in looking over.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

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