User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 37

  1. #11
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INfj
    Posts
    3,741

    Default

    Hmmmm the evaluation of "doing better" and "getting more done" depends on how you define those two things.

    How do you compare having numerous ingenious ideas that piles up and not get very far compared to completion of a more bland project? *scratches head* Highly subjective...

    Without initial idea, you get no starting point. Without adaptation/implementation (follow-through) you get nothing completed. So the ideal situation as mentioned by Ezra and Elfie would be to bounce it back and forth between P and J. In other words, another lesson on maintaining the balancing act.

    People ought to be flexible... if you cannot meld strengths together, you do not have a team. *coughs* A demonstration of two of my life principles to you Elfie... adaptability with balance

  2. #12
    Senior Member Gabe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    590

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezra View Post
    No, not sex (at least not that I know of). What I mean is that Judgers will often get more done than Perceivers. I've been experimenting recently; going with the flow - moving without a plan - and thinking on my feet. And I've recognised that structure increases efficiency in accomplishment all the time. It's not some bias against Perceivers; I simply find that with a plan, one can achieve more, and one is very rarely susceptible to doing things one should not, because one already has a plan. Without a plan, one feels without obligation, and hence free, to do what they want when they want. With a plan of action, guilt that one has not done what one set out to do ensures that one does it; in other words, one won't go off the rails. Essentially, you're forcing yourself to adapt to the task at hand as opposed to taking the Perceiver's route of adapting the task to one's mindframe. I'm not saying it's "bad" or "worse" than what the Judger does; it's simply less effective in getting things done IMO. Perhaps the Judging route sacrifices low stress levels for a more accomplished life. I don't know. That's another topic.

    ETA: One other thing to mention is that I'm not implying that Judgers do a better job of what they do than do Perceivers, or even that it is equal to the Perceiver's doing a job. The Perceiver might well do a better job. All I'm saying is that Judgers are better at doing more stuff in a given amount of time because they have structure.
    nah, not at all true. 'Judgers' that grow up rich and spoiled are just as lazy as anyone. I think you should try to meet some 'percievers' who grew up very poor. This 'lazy', 'hardworking' stuff has a lot more to do with background, experience, and parenting.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Gabe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    590

    Default

    Also, be reminded that extraverted thinking is very fast on the debate team and in math class, but it's very slow in..
    expert chefs don't use measuring cups.
    Carpenters don't walk around practicing anylitic geometry problems.
    Engineers don't practice solving partial fraction integrals.
    Good drivers don't exact relative velocities when deciding whether to pass someone.
    and much, much more (go ahead and add more)

  4. #14
    Earth Exalted Thursday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    8w9 sp/sx
    Socionics
    LIE
    Posts
    3,965

    Default

    could we stop posting these threads that declare one preference better than the other
    each type can arrive at the same decision or result, and efficiently
    but in a different " type " of way
    and if you limit yourself to 4 letters, J or not,
    then you don't do it better at all
    you're narrow-minded and inhibited

    this is not to say that your intentions were not honorable,
    but its very ignorant to endorse such a thing
    I N V I C T U S

  5. #15
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Posts
    3,272

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe View Post
    Also, be reminded that extraverted thinking is very fast on the debate team and in math class, but it's very slow in..
    expert chefs don't use measuring cups.
    Carpenters don't walk around practicing anylitic geometry problems.
    Engineers don't practice solving partial fraction integrals.
    Good drivers don't exact relative velocities when deciding whether to pass someone.
    and much, much more (go ahead and add more)
    Gabe hit a good spot in here.

    I have for years recognized the development of a skill from a point where you "plan" it to a point where you "do" it, omitting a phase where you have to consciously think about performing the process.

    Planning is a good way of doing stuff you wouldn't otherwise be able to do.

    Still, the acme of skill is to do instantaneously. To just reply to some person without stopping to ponder what to say. To do most of anything just without thinking.

    Yet, there is so much to be done, an endless, uncountable number of actions that a person can do - so the capability to plan will extend a person's overall capabilities tremendously. Not all can be learned to the greatest extent where you can perform everything without effort.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  6. #16
    Senior Member millerm277's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Posts
    978

    Default

    In my opinion, the J type will often get more done, when work is concentrated on one specific task. The P type will get more done overall, although finishing one specific task may take longer, we will finish more things in the end.

    For an example of this, in my engineering class our teacher told us to build (small) bridges out of balsa wood, so we could load test them later, and analyze the designs. We all started building at about the same time.

    By day 2, my friend, who is definitely a J type, had almost finished one complete side. Meanwhile, I just had a bunch of random glued together pieces, that at first glance weren't much of anything. Fast forward to day 6...I was done, and my friend was still attaching the pieces to connect the sides. Why? Because my J friend wanted to work on the one thing he was working on until it was done, while I skipped around. My method worked better, because I didn't have to wait around for the glue to set.
    I-95%, S-84%, T-89%, P-84%

  7. #17
    perdu fleur par bologne Martoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    1,361

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezra View Post
    I've been experimenting recently; going with the flow - moving without a plan - and thinking on my feet. And I've recognised that structure increases efficiency in accomplishment all the time.
    The big flaw in your experiment, Ezra, is that you haven't tried being a P. You've just tried being a J without a plan. There's more to being a perceiver than trying to "go with the flow" and "think on your feet".

    Quote Originally Posted by Usehername View Post
    Go take an extreme P
    Sorry, just had to quote that.
    I'm not a procrastinator. I'm a long-term planner.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    837

    Default

    I'm confused. What's the point of "getting things done"?
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  9. #19
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    istp
    Posts
    1,962

    Default

    a preconceived course of action is not necessarily the best course of action

    the two approaches have their respective advantages... to planning, the ability to prepare in advance and to make decisions without losing perspective. to "playing it by ear", the most apt response based on the myriad of variables known only in the moment.


    my approach has always been one of structure where structure is both advantageous and achievable in an accurate manner, which is far less often than one would think. simply, you only need to know what you need to guess, everything else will make itself clear.

    the only way to know how much thinking is required for something is experience.

  10. #20
    Plumage and Moult proteanmix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Enneagram
    1w2
    Posts
    5,514

    Default

    Ezra, unfortunately Ps outnumber Js on the forum. Your theory was dead in the water.

Similar Threads

  1. [ENTP] My ENTP is so different from me. How do I deal with it better?
    By CubeWuerfel in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-02-2017, 05:22 PM
  2. Why do you do it?
    By Mycroft in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 10-27-2016, 01:17 PM
  3. The desert island. How would you do it?
    By Valiant in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 07-10-2009, 09:17 AM
  4. SJ? Either way DON'T DO IT!!
    By Xander in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 09-12-2007, 05:03 AM
  5. Finally gonna do it.
    By PuddleRiver in forum Welcomes and Introductions
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-26-2007, 11:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO