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  1. #1
    Senior Member Little_Sticks's Avatar
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    Default intuition and dissociation

    From our Great Depository of Armchair Psychology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociation):
    Quote Originally Posted by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociation
    Dissociation is an altered state of consciousness characterized by partial or complete disruption of the normal integration of a person’s normal conscious or psychological functioning.[1] Dissociation is most commonly experienced as a subjective perception of one's consciousness being detached from one's emotions, body and/or immediate surroundings.[2] Van der Kolk et al.[3] describe dissociation as a "compartmentalization of experience." Under normal conditions, consciousness, memory, emotions, sensory awareness, affect, etc., are integrated; with dissociation, in contrast, these traits are discretely compartmentalized to greater or lesser degrees.
    I'm wondering what you all think about this. Do you think it relates to intuition? I would especially like to hear from those that strongly believe themselves to be Ni-dominant.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Lily flower's Avatar
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    I don't dissociate well at all, but I am very strong in the N department. Sometimes I am thinking so hard that I don't notice what is going on around me, but I think that is being distracted more than dissociating.

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    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    I dissociate like a madman.

  4. #4
    Charting a course
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    It takes something traumatic for me to do so.

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    Senior Member Jack427's Avatar
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    I have depersonalization disorder, I haven't experienced the symptoms in some time though.

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    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    My INTJ friend is in disassociated state nearly all the time. He works in a supermarket and is able to work in disassociated state for quite long periods of time and he works as the cashier(or what ever its called), then snaps out when someone asks something and gets baffled, but is able to review what happened after he snaps out, but it takes few seconds.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

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  7. #7
    Senior Member Kyrielle's Avatar
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    When confronted with an experience that is entirely alien to me, my brain will separate itself almost completely from my body in order to suck in as much information as possible. Once the experience is over or a pattern has been recognized, all the information I gathered is then processed over the next few hours (days). The next time I encounter that experience, that happens less. It usually takes a couple of times before I stop doing that and am able to fully engage myself as a whole.

    I have been described as "clinical" when I get into that mode, and I would say that's fairly apt. In all other cases, I'm like most other people as far as integration goes. Though my head is often in the clouds, but that's a different matter. What I described here is completely different from that.
    "I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference."

    Robert Frost

  8. #8
    Senior Member Lily flower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyrielle View Post
    When confronted with an experience that is entirely alien to me, my brain will separate itself almost completely from my body in order to suck in as much information as possible. Once the experience is over or a pattern has been recognized, all the information I gathered is then processed over the next few hours (days). The next time I encounter that experience, that happens less. It usually takes a couple of times before I stop doing that and am able to fully engage myself as a whole.

    I have been described as "clinical" when I get into that mode, and I would say that's fairly apt. In all other cases, I'm like most other people as far as integration goes. Though my head is often in the clouds, but that's a different matter. What I described here is completely different from that.
    You sound like an INTJ in this quote.

  9. #9
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    I just really don't see what that would have to do with type. People of any type who undergo trauma, for example, can be prone to disassociation. Compartmentalization of thought and experience is another way that people deny experiences that they do not want to deal with, and that is not something confined to a particular type.... although some types are more prone to being "rigid" in mindset and not wanting to update and integrate one's experience consciously.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  10. #10

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    I think that a good part of my childhood and adolescence involved lessons in dissocation, not in my own household or family but in my school and dealing with peers, the whole of later primary school and secondary school a great emphasis was put upon being "hard", ie unfeeling, hidding or simply not having feelings.

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