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  1. #1

    Default Crows Nest Functions

    What is your take on this. Makes gut level sense to me that I use introverted thinking where introverted feeling doesn't cut it.

    How about you? On a personal level or a dry ivory tower analytical level.

  2. #2
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    I use all the functions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    What is your take on this. Makes gut level sense to me that I use introverted thinking where introverted feeling doesn't cut it.

    How about you? On a personal level or a dry ivory tower analytical level.
    What are crows nest functions?

    Anyway, I mostly agree with your post in the sense that I do the same thing when Fi tools aren't suited to the situation. For example, if I'm working on a bibliographical essay where I have to review books or articles, I'll initially make some quick Fi-driven judgments based on tone and content (do I like this? Does it fit with my general sense of the subject?) but once I actually get down to writing a critique, I tend to go over things with a fine-toothed comb and try to consider finer points that the author might have overlooked or misinterpreted.

    That part doesn't come so easily to me and usually takes a good bit of effort and concentration to keep up for prolonged periods, but nevertheless it's a skill I've acquired. I wouldn't attribute it to Ti necessarily but rather to doing what it takes to get the job done. It's largely a matter of expedience.

  4. #4

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    Crows nest functions is a theory in Lenore Thompson's book that you use the opposite functions to the top two in situations the primary two don't cut it.

    So I would use Ti in place of Fi.
    Ne in place of Se.

    Makes sense to me that I could more easily flip from Fi to Ti cognitively. Seems it would take less effort.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Crows nest functions is a theory in Lenore Thompson's book that you use the opposite functions to the top two in situations the primary two don't cut it.

    So I would use Ti in place of Fi.
    Ne in place of Se.

    Makes sense to me that I could more easily flip from Fi to Ti cognitively. Seems it would take less effort.
    Interesting stuff. Well, I can initially "flip" to Ti with just a little effort (which is why I've considered an INTP typing) but it gets exhausting after a while. I look at Ti users on this site (well, the INTPs at any rate) writing paragraph upon paragraph in each post and analyzing minute details with excruciating thoroughness, and I really do wonder how they do it in a way that boosts energy.

    On the other hand, there are INTP posters like Stigmata whose posts I find pretty easy to relate to, mostly because they're brief and colourful while still retaining a bit of the T-ish sting. So I dunno.

    I guess you're right in the sense that Ti seems easier to access in many ways than Te, which I'm actually supposed to have, albeit in minuscule amounts. There are some things about Te that make a lot of sense to me, like taking the shortest path available while doing an unpleasant task and leaving the scenic route for something I actually enjoy, or getting annoyed if people ramble on when I'm stressed instead of getting to the point. Still, it seems to come to the fore only when I'm severely out of sorts, whereas Ti related tasks don't usually put me in ragingly bad moods if I see the value in doing them.

    On the other hand, flipping from Ne to Se is extremely difficult to say the least and I shy away from situations that demand it or palm off the job to someone who can do it better.

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    Okay, I read a summary of Thomson's hypothesis on some shady website (LINK). Based on that, I wouldn't say I agree with her assessment, because I don't think I turn instinctively to Ti when FiNe fail. I move on to Si, root around for possible models I've encountered in the past and stored to see if I can use them to get past the problem, and then, if that doesn't work either, I try to pull things apart clinically and tease out relevant solutions. Does that honestly work well for me though? I don't really know. For example, I hate making pros and cons lists and I often feel like they're tell me nothing meaningful about the right or even desirable course of action. On the other hand, it IS one possible method that I've stored and I turn to it when I've exhausted my initial set of options.

  7. #7
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    Its same as shadow functions, just a different name for them. i used to think that we use 8 functions, but then i realized that we just use the four and combining them makes them look sometimes as if the function was in opposite attitude, but its just(for example) Te + Fi looking like Ti or Fe.

    I have that book of lenores and there is nothing in the book that would make me believe that its 8 functions we use.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post
    Its same as shadow functions, just a different name for them. i used to think that we use 8 functions, but then i realized that we just use the four and combining them makes them look sometimes as if the function was in opposite attitude, but its just(for example) Te + Fi looking like Ti or Fe.

    I have that book of lenores and there is nothing in the book that would make me believe that its 8 functions we use.
    It is on page 89 about crows nest functions. Crows nest functions aren't the same as shadow functions, they are functions we can use pretty well. It is the double agent functions that are like shadow functions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    It is on page 89 about crows nest functions. Crows nest functions aren't the same as shadow functions, they are functions we can use pretty well. It is the double agent functions that are like shadow functions.
    No one claimed that we cant use these so called shadow functions well, especially fifth and swventh(crows nest).

    I scored nearly as high Fi on 8 function test than what i scored with my Ne. my Se i dont remember exactly, but it was definitely higher than my Fe.

    I used to think it was Fi i was using(had some issues bringing it up), until i realized that i was Ti analyzing my Fe at full power, after seeing how things really were i was able to sort my mind in short time(after being like 8 months in this so called Fi mode). i find it quite weird that if i were actually using Fi, me lying to myself about FeTi instead of Fi would have made thing any better..

    This so called Se comes from Neing over Si, seeing possibilities in external world based on 'what is' inside. it naturally seems like Se because im looking at external world, but based introverted lens of Si.

    I suggest looking at jungs work in depth and youll figure this out.
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

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    I find myself using Fi quite a bit. Se not so much.
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