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  1. #51
    Senior Member Gabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric B View Post
    Wouldn't that be Fe (for the ESTJ; and Ni as "deceiving")?

    I still don't fully understand the function myself. It's supposed to be about getting a sense of the future from reading abstract patterns. What does that have to do with psychopathy; eg. chopping someone up in a shower?
    I think it would be wierd if the US cultures modal type fit to every process role all the way down to eighth. Remember, a cultural type is a very different phenomenon than an individual's type.

    As for the shower scene part, I admit I'm not quite sure what that has to do with Ni. I'll have to think about that for a while (or ask someone).

  2. #52
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    gUHpi would be the most absurd one xD
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  3. #53
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe View Post
    With (have I mentioned this before on this site yet) Nikola Tesla (definate INTJ) as one of the examples of the 'madman'/'psycho' problem that domni's deal with. By the way, I'm also pretty sure that Russel Crowe's character in Beautiful Mind is also an INTJ. Have you seen it?
    Gabe as always you're insightful with your analyses. I will have to do some research when I find the time and pick your brain. I always considered John Nash an INTP, but it makes sense that he may be INTJ, although we should not rule out ENTP (which is what I think Tesla may have been as well). Yes I have the video, the soundtrack and the PBS special "Beautiful Madness" which is scary compared to the movie.

  4. #54
    Senior Member Gabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by "?" View Post
    Gabe as always you're insightful with your analyses. I will have to do some research when I find the time and pick your brain. I always considered John Nash an INTP, but it makes sense that he may be INTJ, although we should not rule out ENTP (which is what I think Tesla may have been as well). Yes I have the video, the soundtrack and the PBS special "Beautiful Madness" which is scary compared to the movie.
    John Nash as played-by-Russel-Crowe was an INTJ. His madness was perception-based, and his imaginary friends can be fairly well mapped as INTJ archetypes (The imaginary boss as a Te type, the imaginary roomate as a Se type, and the child as a Fi type). Also, the Ti type in the movie (the psychiatrist/psychologist?) has the wisdom to help Nash out of his madness but threatens to immobilize Nash with the diagnosis ("You can't think your way out of this, because the problem is in your head"). I will have to do more research myself before I can confidently guess what type John Nash was IRL.
    As for Tesla, I'm pretty sure he was an INTJ.

    http://thinkexist.com/quotes/nikola_tesla/

  5. #55
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    ENTPs and ENFPs are skilled at non-linear thought. I enjoy the head trips they take me on as friends or entertainers. They make fantastic performers.

    I also have to just note the discrepancy between anecdotal descriptions of INFJs and how that type is described in the MBTI literature. What is the reason for this? I still wonder if it is in fact the most misunderstood type and used as a dumping ground for all behaviors that don't make sense to people. The literature describes them as organized, responsible, empathetic, insightful. Even Mother Teresa and Ghandi are considered INFJ. Contrast that with the multitude of "oh yeah, my crazy ex is an INFJ" that pervades these online anecdotal responses. I feel a bit badly for the type to have to wade through so much prejudice and lack of critical examination and question how many people could really have dated such a reclusive type that represents something like 1% of the population.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

  6. #56
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    It's a seamless perspective shift to understand the patterns right in front of you. Most people think that there's a perspective out there that makes Ni-types think it's totally okay to chop up people in showers. But, you know, we're not crazy -- we'd only do it if the situation required it.
    Figures. The one experience I've had with a known Ni type: lashed out with an erratic reaction to something, and then calmly justified it with function dynamics, and that the Ni "knew" things would ultimately come out from it "OK" in the end.
    I am so unused to that function, at least in a primary position!

  7. #57
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonia View Post
    I also have to just note the discrepancy between anecdotal descriptions of INFJs and how that type is described in the MBTI literature. What is the reason for this? I still wonder if it is in fact the most misunderstood type and used as a dumping ground for all behaviors that don't make sense to people. The literature describes them as organized, responsible, empathetic, insightful. Even Mother Teresa and Ghandi are considered INFJ. Contrast that with the multitude of "oh yeah, my crazy ex is an INFJ" that pervades these online anecdotal responses. I feel a bit badly for the type to have to wade through so much prejudice and lack of critical examination and question how many people could really have dated such a reclusive type that represents something like 1% of the population.
    It's a very good point, but then again there could be a fairly vast assortment of unhealthy INFJs out there, with all the supposed 'crap' that they would get.

    Take for example the INTJ forum. There are a lot of angry people on that forum, complaining about society at large. It's been estimated that a lot of people there are not actual INTJs, although there's still probably a fair amount that are INTJs, and still as angry as they describe themselves as. One could say, "Now wait, these are INTJs! Shouldn't they have gotten off their asses, stopped complaining, and be working on something big?" when what's happened is they got stuck on themselves and refuse to move on.

    And remember, 1% of the population isn't really *that* small. There are 2,300 people in my school, so there should be about 23 INFJs by that statistic. Imagine in a city of New York, with its estimated population of 19,306,183 people, we'd have potentially 19,306 INFJs. They might be hard to find in 19 million people, but considering that they're likely attracted to certain venues, they wouldn't be too incredibly difficult to find.

    There's always that whole assumption that 'quiet' = 'shy'. I can see a potential problem with relationships with people who wouldn't expect such force coming from a person who doesn't talk much and usually remains relatively unassuming. All of the sudden this person who is supposedly 'quiet and gentle' is making the orders. Many don't expect it, and on top of that, many don't like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric B View Post
    Figures. The one experience I've had with a known Ni type: lashed out with an erratic reaction to something, and then calmly justified it with function dynamics, and that the Ni "knew" things would ultimately come out from it "OK" in the end.
    I am so unused to that function, at least in a primary position!
    Umm. Are you sure that wasn't Se?
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  8. #58
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe View Post
    John Nash as played-by-Russel-Crowe was an INTJ. His madness was perception-based, and his imaginary friends can be fairly well mapped as INTJ archetypes (The imaginary boss as a Te type, the imaginary roomate as a Se type, and the child as a Fi type). Also, the Ti type in the movie (the psychiatrist/psychologist?) has the wisdom to help Nash out of his madness but threatens to immobilize Nash with the diagnosis ("You can't think your way out of this, because the problem is in your head"). I will have to do more research myself before I can confidently guess what type John Nash was IRL.
    As for Tesla, I'm pretty sure he was an INTJ.

    Nikola Tesla quotes
    Yet in reading excerpts Beebe how can you not consider this INTJ function usage as a shadow side of ENTP?

  9. #59
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    Umm. Are you sure that wasn't Se?
    Who knows? With the latter part (foreseeing the outcome), that would definitely be Ni. Se would be inferior, but still primary, and the behavior was supposed to involve the shadows as well.

  10. #60
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    Your opposite type is always the most absurd.

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