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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post
    Jung didnt say that he is Ni dom, thats something that you said. i posted the same video on first page of this topic and analyzed it like you did. but your analysis sucks obviously


    Dude, you're so moronic.

    Read the whole thing.

  2. #152
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    INTJ seems likely. Yes he's NT.

    INTJs getting mistyped because they're too theoretical or think too much is hilarious, they're introverted and intuitive most of all, that's what NTs are all about in general. This isn't Keirsey.

    But I see his main function being more intuitive than thinking, he seems carried overall by an internal N inspiration and quite receptive and open to different ideas and approaches, and from the video he doesn't seem inferior feeling. If he developed it later and I'm wrong I won't figure it out until later but this would be my guess now. I see nothing wrong with INTJ and having your own personality system, going that deep into observation and dedicating your life to psychology, (I've been in his boat too and like thinking about it) unless INTJs aren't allowed to be theoretically creative as a life choice.

    I don't think INTJ life has to revolve around applying Te to practical work, but can help a lot following reasoning on the spot, organizing your ideas, and making them more efficient to apply on the outside. Doesn't mean they won't still be theoretical.

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post


    Dude, you're so moronic.

    Read the whole thing.
    There are no jungs words there. just quote of someone saying something who heard something from someone who said jung saying something.

    There is a documentary about jung(cba to find it as i dont remember which one it was and there are quite many of them and they are rather long) where marie-louise von franz(pretty much jungs right hand and one of the most respected jungian analyst) says that she is Ti type with intuition and says that jung was same type as she is..
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
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  4. #154
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post

    As I've said, though, I think one of the most certain things is that he was a Ti-user.

    So, if he was an Ni-dom, and a Ti-user...
    That's good logic (relating to INFJ), but it doesn't explain why he said he had trouble with feeling. It would mean he developed his tertiary before his auxiliary, that he would have had a particularly weak auxiliary, which would result in a somewhat unbalanced child or young adult I think. It would mean that Ni would have dominated his personality to such an extent that he would likely have had trouble functioning in the external world. Wonder what he was like when he was younger.

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  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post
    There are no jungs words there. just quote of someone saying something who heard something from someone who said jung saying something.
    Actually, it's allegedly a quote from Jung himself, as dictated by someone who's correspondence with Jung from 1957-1960 was extensive and relevant enough to be published almost in its entirety in Vol. 2 of the Jung Letters. Jung allegedly said these words during a meeting with this man, Stephen Abrams, during a long talk at Jung's house in Kusnacht, Switzerland on Dec. 18th, 1959 (after the BBC interview).

    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post
    There is a documentary about jung(cba to find it as i dont remember which one it was and there are quite many of them and they are rather long) where marie-louise von franz(pretty much jungs right hand and one of the most respected jungian analyst) says that she is Ti type with intuition and says that jung was same type as she is..
    I'd be interested in seeing the documentary, if you could remember which one it is.

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    That's good logic (relating to INFJ), but it doesn't explain why he said he had trouble with feeling. It would mean he developed his tertiary before his auxiliary, that he would have had a particularly weak auxiliary, which would result in a somewhat unbalanced child or young adult I think. It would mean that Ni would have dominated his personality to such an extent that he would likely have had trouble functioning in the external world. Wonder what he was like when he was younger.
    From what I've read, almost exactly how you described.

    Not lying.

    Quote Originally Posted by wikipedia
    Early years

    Carl Jung was born Karl Gustav II Jung in Kesswil, in the Swiss canton of Thurgau, as the fourth but only surviving child of Paul Achilles Jung and Emilie Preiswerk. Emilie Preiswerk was the youngest child of Samuel Preiswerk, Paul Achilles Jung's professor of Hebrew. His father was a poor rural pastor in the Swiss Reformed Church, while his mother came from a wealthy and established Swiss family.

    When Jung was six months old his father was appointed to a more prosperous parish in Laufen. Meanwhile, the tension between his parents was growing. An eccentric and depressed woman, Emilie Jung spent much of the time in her own separate bedroom, enthralled by the spirits that she said visited her at night. Jung had a better relationship with his father because he thought him to be predictable and thought his mother to be very problematic. Although during the day he also saw her as predictable, at night he felt some frightening influences from her room. At night his mother became strange and mysterious. Jung claimed that one night he saw a faintly luminous and indefinite figure coming from her room, with a head detached from the neck and floating in the air in front of the body.

    His mother left Laufen for several months of hospitalization near Basel for an unknown physical ailment. Young Carl Jung was taken by his father to live with Emilie Jung's unmarried sister in Basel, but was later brought back to the pastor's residence. Emilie's continuing bouts of absence and often depressed mood influenced her son's attitude towards women — one of "innate unreliability," a view that he later called the "handicap I started off with" and that resulted in his sometimes patriarchal views of women. After three years of living in Laufen, Paul Jung requested a transfer and was called to Kleinhüningen in 1879. The relocation brought Emilie Jung in closer contact to her family and lifted her melancholy and despondent mood.

    A solitary and introverted child, Jung was convinced from childhood that he had two personalities — a modern Swiss citizen and a personality more at home in the eighteenth century. "Personality Number 1," as he termed it, was a typical schoolboy living in the era of the time, while "Personality Number 2" was a dignified, authoritative and influential man from the past. Although Jung was close to both parents he was rather disappointed in his father's academic approach to faith.

    A number of childhood memories had made a life-long impression on him. As a boy he carved a tiny mannequin into the end of the wooden ruler from his pupil's pencil case and placed it inside the case. He then added a stone which he had painted into upper and lower halves and hid the case in the attic. Periodically he would come back to the mannequin, often bringing tiny sheets of paper with messages inscribed on them in his own secret language. This ceremonial act, he later reflected, brought him a feeling of inner peace and security. In later years he discovered that similarities existed in this memory and the totems of native peoples like the collection of soul-stones near Arlesheim, or the tjurungas of Australia. This, he concluded, was an unconscious ritual that he did not question or understand at the time, but which was practiced in a strikingly similar way in faraway locations that he as a young boy had no way of consciously knowing about. His findings on psychological archetypes and the collective unconscious were inspired in part by these experiences.

    Shortly before the end of his first year at the Humanistisches Gymnasium in Basel, at the age of twelve, he was pushed to the ground by another boy so hard that he was for a moment unconscious (Jung later recognized that the incident was his fault, indirectly). A thought then came to him that "now you won't have to go to school any more." From then on, whenever he started off to school or began homework, he fainted. He remained at home for the next six months until he overheard his father speaking worriedly to a visitor of his future ability to support himself, as they suspected he had epilepsy. With little money in the family, this brought the boy to reality and he realized the need for academic excellence. He immediately went into his father's study and began poring over Latin grammar. He fainted three more times, but eventually he overcame the urge and did not faint again. This event, Jung later recalled, "was when I learned what a neurosis is."

    Jung had no plans to study psychiatry, because it was held in contempt in those days. But as he started studying his psychiatric textbook, he became very excited when he read that psychoses are personality diseases. Immediately he understood this was the field that interested him the most. It combined both biological and spiritual facts and this was what he was searching for.


    In 1895, Jung studied medicine at the University of Basel. In 1900, he worked in the Burghölzli, a psychiatric hospital in Zurich, with Eugen Bleuler. His dissertation, published in 1903, was titled "On the Psychology and Pathology of So-Called Occult Phenomena." In 1906, he published Studies in Word Association and later sent a copy of this book to Sigmund Freud, after which a close friendship between these two men followed for some six years (see section on Relationship with Freud). In 1912 Jung published Wandlungen und Symbole der Libido (known in English as Psychology of the Unconscious) resulting in a theoretical divergence between him and Freud and consequently a break in their friendship, both stating that the other was unable to admit he could possibly be wrong. After this falling-out, Jung went through a pivotal and difficult psychological transformation, which was exacerbated by news of the First World War. Henri Ellenberger called Jung's experience a "creative illness" and compared it to Freud's period of what he called neurasthenia and hysteria.

    During World War I Jung was drafted as an army doctor and soon made commandant of an internment camp for British officers and soldiers. (Swiss neutrality obliged the Swiss to intern personnel from either side of the conflict who crossed their frontier to evade capture.) Jung worked to improve the conditions for these soldiers stranded in neutral territory; he encouraged them to attend university courses.

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    Actually, it's allegedly a quote from Jung himself, as dictated by someone who's correspondence with Jung from 1957-1960 was extensive and relevant enough to be published almost in its entirety in Vol. 2 of the Jung Letters. Jung allegedly said these words during a meeting with this man, Stephen Abrams, during a long talk at Jung's house in Kusnacht, Switzerland on Dec. 18th, 1959 (after the BBC interview).



    I'd be interested in seeing the documentary, if you could remember which one it is.
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    — C.G. Jung

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  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post

    So, if he was an Ni-dom, and a Ti-user...
    So, if I'm hearing you correctly, in this particular statement, you are arguing he was an INFJ?

    His definition of Fe is the worst out of all his definitions. He defines it loosely (for him) and even inaccurately (based on being an Fe user myself), and comparing his wonderful definitions and descriptions of Ti/Te. Te and Fe should be analogous but they are not; he leaves things out in his Fe descriptors.

    Definitely NOT an INFJ.



    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post

    And, since NiTi is the INFJ dominant loop, Ti might actually develop even before the auxiliary, due to tertiary temptation...
    The tertiary is not going to develop before the auxiliary. Again, you are thinking too abtrusely. At 8 the auxiliary is starting to be utilized over the other functions (besides the dominant). I don't see an 8 year old leaning toward 'tertiary temptation.' He would then just have a different auxiliary, would he not?

    You are very attached to the Ni theory. If Jung was an INTP, he could just as easily have an overly developed Ni, since Ne was his aux function. You know the functions tests on here.....most people seemed to have a good use of both attitudes of their aux function, and even tert function, esp the older one gets.
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  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post
    [idiocy]
    Per your words: there are many of them, so I was hoping you could be something other than a and point me to which one it was.

    Alas, that is too difficult for you.

  10. #160
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zarathustra View Post
    From what I've read, almost exactly how you described.

    Not lying.
    Wow. Well that's interesting.

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