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Thread: Type my son

  1. #231
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    Quote Originally Posted by mal12345 View Post
    What inferior sensing traits? And how do they affect a person?
    Having an inferior Se (INxJ) or Si (ENxP). They keep them from interacting with their physical external environment (unless it's tricky Ne). This would keep them in their own little shell, which they prefer. Once forced out with stimuli from their physical environment, if too much will cause them to figuratively "flip-their-shit" and cause them to introvert again. Yes. Introverted intuition is introverted and partly why they would, but the lack of willingness of an INTJ to interact with their physical environment because of intuition being dominant and sensing being inferior is the other half.

  2. #232
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    I hear you mal12345, but hypersensitivity is most commonly a medical term.

    Hypersensitivity:

    Occasionally, the immune system responds inappropriately to the presence of antigen. These responses are refered to as hypersensitivities. There are four different types of hypersensitivities that result from different alterations of the immune system. These types are classified as:
    Type I: Immediate Hypersensitivity
    Type II: Cytotoxic Hypersensitivity
    Type III: Immune Complex Hypersensitivity
    Type IV: Delayed Hypersensitivity

    --Source: http://www.cehs.siu.edu/fix/medmicro/hyper.htm


    So what do you both mean as "hypersensitive?"

    Here's a possible HSP list:

    Common characteristics include:

    • Needing alone time
    • Being very conscientious (sometimes to the point of being a perfectionist)
    • Having a heightened awareness of subtleties in their environment
    • Can become overwhelmed and need to “get away” to be by themselves seeking solitude, relief and comfort
    • May feel compelled to file and organize things and thoughts
    • Appreciate and enjoy simplicity and may become over stimulated and even immobilized by chaos, clutter or stress
    • Are very uncomfortable when feeling things are getting out of control
    • Have a deep, rich, inner life, are very spiritual, and experience vivid dreams
    • Are very intuitive and can usually sense if someone isn’t telling the truth or if something else is wrong
    • Become easily concerned and think or worry about things, and may have heard “You take things too personally,” “Why are you so touchy?” or “You’re too sensitive” throughout their life
    • May have also had the experience of “cutting people out” of their life
    • Are easily startled, and cautious in new situations
    • May have trouble sleeping
    • May be extra sensitive to pain
    • Don’t like crowds (unless they are kindred spirits)
    • Often avoid violent movies and TV shows to protect their finely tuned nervous system
    • Have a deep respect and appreciation of nature, music and art


    --Source: http://www.genconnect.com/health/are...sitive-person/
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
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    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  3. #233
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    And are folks positing in this thread that primarily Si and Se inferior types are "HSP"? That's interesting, but I can't find any research to support that.

    Plus anecdotally, I know plenty of "sensitive" individuals of many types, with Se or Si higher in function order. It may be more of an introverted tendency in general.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  4. #234
    Anew Leaf
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    Thanks Peacebaby. What you say makes far more sense. And that is what I was asking about. A lot of the HSP traits sound like me.


  5. #235
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceBaby View Post
    And are folks positing in this thread that primarily Si and Se inferior types are "HSP"? That's interesting, but I can't find any research to support that.

    Plus anecdotally, I know plenty of "sensitive" individuals of many types, with Se or Si aux. It may be more of an introverted tendency in general.
    My ESFJ ex-wife is HSP. I am not.

    I strongly doubt it has anything to do with type.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  6. #236
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReflecTcelfeR View Post
    Having an inferior Se (INxJ) or Si (ENxP). They keep them from interacting with their physical external environment (unless it's tricky Ne). This would keep them in their own little shell, which they prefer. Once forced out with stimuli from their physical environment, if too much will cause them to figuratively "flip-their-shit" and cause them to introvert again. Yes. Introverted intuition is introverted and partly why they would, but the lack of willingness of an INTJ to interact with their physical environment because of intuition being dominant and sensing being inferior is the other half.
    That's a very reductive and deterministic explanation of psychological phenomena. And it goes along with Jim who didn't explain it very well.
    But at least it is better (I guess) than Marmie pummeling me with deconstructionist post-modernism earlier on in this thread.

    All I can say to you is that any notion of "cause" here has to be considered as figurative, and not literal, although the so-called "effects" are indeed literal (i.e., specific behaviors), and phenomenal. All this function talk should therefore be considered, not just figurative, but noumenal. It is to lay claim to the idea that something in the invisible, spiritual realm, that is not even a possible thought or feeling or other mental representation, can somehow affect the realm of concretes.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  7. #237
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    My ESFJ ex-wife is HSP. I am not.

    I strongly doubt it has anything to do with type.
    Indeed. Interesting. And I haven't yet found any studies on type and HSP so I will keep searching.

    Found this interesting paper though: http://cogprints.org/4738/1/Environ....rs_Journal.pdf

    While no single factor in a person’s background is likely
    to distinguish him/her as “sensitive,” the author found
    eight demographic or personality factors to be significant:
    1. Being female;
    2. Being a first-born or only child;
    3. Being single;
    4. Being ambidextrous;
    5. Appraising oneself as an imaginative thinker;
    6. Appraising oneself as introverted;
    7. Recalling a plainly traumatic event— or series of
    events—in childhood;
    8. Asserting that one’s presence causes televisions,
    lights, computers, etc to malfunction.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  8. #238
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    It's predictable because it is in somewhat a stereotype, which is what cognitive functions are about. It's reductive for that same reason, as well as it is easier to explain and bridge the disagreement with an argument that simplifies it. Of course this world is full of anomalies and chance will take it's hold here better, but it doesn't really prove me wrong it just says that there are plenty of other possibilities that could occur, it just so happens that her son (Lily's) corresponds with this very concept, that's why we're defending it.

    I'm a little confused on that last paragraph. I get what it's saying, but not so much what you're trying to prove.

  9. #239
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    My ESFJ ex-wife is HSP. I am not.

    I strongly doubt it has anything to do with type.
    Hahaha, ohhhh... Pointless arguing. Let's hope we haven't wasted this time, though of course type may not affect it, but I would like to hear your thoughts on why.

  10. #240
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReflecTcelfeR View Post
    It's predictable because it is in somewhat a stereotype, which is what cognitive functions are about. It's reductive for that same reason, as well as it is easier to explain and bridge the disagreement with an argument that simplifies it. Of course this world is full of anomalies and chance will take it's hold here better, but it doesn't really prove me wrong it just says that there are plenty of other possibilities that could occur, it just so happens that her son (Lily's) corresponds with this very concept, that's why we're defending it.

    I'm a little confused on that last paragraph. I get what it's saying, but not so much what you're trying to prove.
    You pinpointed a major issue in your first paragraph - one cannot disprove it (nor can one prove it). Part and parcel of being a science - and science works from causality - is the idea of mutability. If your function notions can't be disproven, then that is not a mark in your favor, but a strike against function talk as rational and scientific. It supports dogmatism. (That's why I continually mention reductive determinism - the religion of modern science).

    On the other hand, I have nothing against noumenal talk either, but its expressions are loaded down with subjective and figurative terms that can serve as ad hoc explanations only (for example, "You're such and such because you have inferior Se").

    Introversion, on the other hand, is a plainly described psychological phenomenon that has a proven empirical basis requiring no ad hoc explanations.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

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