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Thread: Type my son

  1. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by mal12345 View Post
    Babies who are difficult to calm down have lower IQ. Some here have mentioned that IQ can increase with age, and I'm ok with that.
    IQ tests are a measurement of a particular type of intelligence, not all intelligence, and mistakes can be made. BABIES WHO ARE HARDER TO CALM DOWN HAVE LOWER IQs?

    I'm with Riva. I think our culture's obsession with standardized testing is fucking sick, just like timing first graders on how fast they can read.

  2. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    I'm with Riva. I think our culture's obsession with standardized testing is fucking sick, just like timing first graders on how fast they can read.
    Thank you. these types of tests are okay to be given to adults whom have the choice of knowing how to interpret them, taking them if they only want to or even not taking them. But kids don't know how to interpret them. They are helpless and they don't have the luxury of even Not Taking them. If they are asked to do it, they have to do it. Urghhh!

    And timing 1st graders on how fast they can read? That's just SICK!

  3. #133
    Certified Sausage Smoker Elfboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mal12345 View Post
    Yes, but isn't it just a function of how he scored relative to other children his age based on a bell curve?
    no. Albert Eintstein and Thomas Edison, both well above genius intelligence, scored terribly on school intelligence tests. in both cases their school teachers thought they were borderline retarded
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  4. #134
    Senior Member Lex Talionis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfboy View Post
    no. Albert Eintstein and Thomas Edison, both well above genius intelligence, scored terribly on school intelligence tests. in both cases their school teachers thought they were borderline retarded
    Pure myth. Provide one reliable source.
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  5. #135
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    I vote INTJ also. I'm thinking Ni-dom child over Ti-dom.

    For comparison, here are some traits of each (the Ni traits remind me more of how you describe your son):

    Quote Originally Posted by J.H. Van der hoop, Conscious Orientation, paraphrased by moi
    Ni-dom As Children:
    - The development of this type is slower and more difficult than that of most other people
    - Have something about them as spontaneous as the Ne type; but it is, both in form and expression, more bizarre, and less intelligible, owing to their perceptions being less explicable from external conditions
    - Not very yielding to influence from their environment
    - May have periods of uncertainty and reserve, after which they suddenly become very determined
    - If they are opposed, they may manifest an astonishing self-will and obstinacy
    - Frequently moody
    - Occasionally brilliant and original
    - Reserved, stubborn and arrogant

    Quote Originally Posted by J.H. Van der hoop, Conscious Orientation, paraphrased by moi
    Ti-dom As Children:
    - Often reserved, somewhat timid and uncertain
    - Seem to not feel at home in the world
    - Will manifest an obstinate, somewhat pedantic decisiveness
    - They have not the cool logicality of the Te type, but take up a more fanatical stand
    - May easily degenerate into dogmatism and extreme pedantry
    - Learn at an early age that while they may inwardly regard something as true, others may not accept it
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

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  6. #136
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    High Functioning Autism

  7. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poconos3 View Post
    High Functioning Autism
    Another experienced clinical psychologist has come to deliver their overwhelmingly well thought through conclusion to a problem to which they had all of the required data and based upon previous experience...

  8. #138
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lily flower View Post
    My husband and I are very concerned about our 10 year old son. He has several learning issues and he doesn't seem to enjoy or want many friends. He also is grumpy a great deal of the time. We don't know if we should be concerned about him - ie take him to counseling. Since he has been this way his whole life, I am wondering if it is just his natural personality. So I thought understanding his type might be useful. I have my own guess, but I would like to hear from others.

    He has never enjoyed physical affection.
    He is a great strategist. Even though he does poorly on most school work, he can beat adults at games like chess and Risk.
    He is very skeptical about commercials and people telling him things in general. He tends to think that people are liars.
    He complains about being bored constantly, but doesn't have any specific interests.
    He enjoys camping/fishing type activities, board games and video games (he especially likes the games that have you build a medieval castle and village and then attack other castles).
    He doesn't seem to have compassion or understanding of other people's feelings, but occasionally he will strongly defend someone who is being bullied or picked on or being treated unjustly.
    He loves to argue/debate.
    He tends to avoid any type of work, but will work really had to get a reward he wants or to get money to buy a video game.
    He has a very strong reaction to smells and noise.
    When he was a baby, the only thing that would calm him down was if I sang to him. He wasn't calmed down by rocking or being held like other babies.

    Any thoughts?
    Damn, sounds similar to me as a kid, just more extreme.
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  9. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Damn, sounds similar to me as a kid, just more extreme.
    Te and Fi are foreign to Fe and Ti. Worse with this Se inferior and the accompanying hypersensitivity to stimuli such as smell and the according need for the kid to keep his head and physical distance from people.

  10. #140
    Senior Member Lily flower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    I'd go with INTJ. No, his IQ isn't 90, but an IQ test actually has to be "interesting" to actually measure that. No 90-IQ kid is going to beat adults at chess.

    I'd say he is very, very bored with school. So was I. School at that age, for me, was torture. I'd procrastinate on the homework. I'd get D's and C's in the really boring classes like "Social Studies." Even the stuff that was interesting was only marginally so. Math was still mechanical memorization. Science was "Oh, look, cool, dinosaurs," and regurgitating scientific "facts." Then there was the social aspect, where no one at that age was anything like me, so ostracization was the order of the day.

    And what happened to me? I grew up and got a Ph.D. in physics.

    Most of the "problems" you note are a result of being a very smart kid who has little in common with his peers, and not even that much in common with the adults in his life. He's stuck trying to figure everything out for himself, because no one in his life can explain things to him in his terms.

    (I was lucky that my parents were N's, INFJ mom, INTP dad, but even then, they didn't really get me all the time, and were worried just as you are about your kid. My brother was a wild child who had to be reigned in with curfews and such, but in my case, when they learned I had a date for the prom in high school, they were so relieved that they helped pay for everything and weren't upset that I stayed out til 7 AM the next morning ...)

    I wouldn't go with a diagnosis of asperger's, at least not yet. He seems perfectly capable of figuring things out, eventually, but he's only 10 years old. Most kids his age have the reassurance that there are others in the world that understand them. No one, except maybe a fellow NTJ or a wise NFP will really be able to connect with him in a way that "clicks."

    I would suggest you try the route of books, because that's the one place I found solace. Books didn't talk down to me or pester me about not fitting in with the crowd. Books would explain things to me that other people just wouldn't (more likely couldn't) explain. I remember fondly books about the planets and stars, the weather, nuclear energy (yes, a kid's book, which gave me a good foundation in how a chain reaction works, around age 10). I also liked fiction if it were about something weird/fantastic, like aliens or telekinesis. I fondly remember Madeleine L'Engle's "A Wrinkle in Time." I also enjoyed reading the manual to my programmable calculator ... which gave me a rudimentary understanding of trigonometry around age 9. [I couldn't do fancy math, but I knew that sin(angle) would tell me "how high" something is when it is going around in circles.]

    Aim for books that you suspect might be "above" his level - they probably aren't. Let him choose the books: run by the section of the bookstore that has topics in which he has expressed interest and let him choose something cool. Or, even cheaper, if he asks one of those weird-ass questions (I know you didn't mention any, but I bet he does!), offer to look it up on wikipedia together. Mostly, just listen for anything he's interested in and encourage that exploration, so long as you deem it appropriate.

    Let him be weird. I think he'll surprise you.
    Thanks for this post. It's a relief to think that he is probably just being his normal self. Sometimes I feel bad for him, because he is in a family of teacher/counselor lovey types. I wonder if that's unpleasant for him. I know it would be unpleasant for me to be in a family of mostly NT's.

    I loved the story about your parents and the prom. Funny!

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