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  1. #1
    your resident asshole
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    Default The problem with intuition

    Okay, I'm about to throw out a lot of bunk here. Read it and take it how you wish. This is just a random thought I felt like posting. Enjoy.

    I don't believe that personality develops over time. Infants are seen as having distinct personalities. However, I do believe that environment can influence personality greatly... but not to begin with. Early on, we experience our "true" personality, which remains fairly constant and typically becomes stronger over time.

    Now, I've heard that it takes time for children to understand the big picture. When we are very young, we see the world as it is and take things as they come... from a sensor's perspective. Our ability to make connections and extrapolate comes from our knowledge and experience. It can only increase with time. Unless you're some sort of crazy child-prodigy, of course.

    So if we start showing our personalities in infancy, how do intuitive types, especially Ne- and Ni-dominants exist?

  2. #2
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    Oh that's easy for me. I used to wonder when I was a teenager why it was so difficult for some people to see things that I saw or that some of my friends saw.

    I don't think it's all that weird. I remember questioning perception when I was about four.

    We're just very imaginative children and may have a very difficult time paying attention or even fitting in with other kids while in elementary school.

    I used to wonder why I couldn't just manage things and "be normal." Now I know.

    Thanks for asking.

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    I also think you're questioning this from the perspective of someone who developed intuition later in life. So it seems impossible to you, maybe.

  4. #4
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    Ahhh... overly imaginative children! I see!

    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    I also think you're questioning this from the perspective of someone who developed intuition later in life. So it seems impossible to you, maybe.
    It's just that... I could have sworn there were some studies done on childhood cognition and perception that showed that children can't see things like the big picture and other intuitive traits until a certain age.

  5. #5
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    in what way did you question perception?

    i definitely, as a child, had a very Fi/Se way of interacting with the world. child in a bubble, observing and never interacting.

    but i've been curious in this as well. how does an Ni or Ne child look at and question the world versus an Si or Se child. i liked learning hands on and on my own. but i also recall as a young child, 4 to 5, questioning if the world was flat, and if so, could you walk to the edge. and just other things of that nature.

    it may take children time to Understand the big picture... but that doesn't mean children don't question it. when you're new to this place, you can't help but to have questions and wonder. "why is the sky blue?" "why is the grass green?" children are always full of questions and curiosity.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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    I wondered if when my mother said yes I was actually hearing no. I was questioning if my perception (input) aligned with what other people were doing or saying (output).

    Pretty simple, but I was also a small child.

    I'm not entirely sure how the dominant function develops exactly, but I do think it becomes extraordinarily obvious during the teen years.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyGeek View Post
    Ahhh... overly imaginative children! I see!

    It's just that... I could have sworn there were some studies done on childhood cognition and perception that showed that children can't see things like the big picture and other intuitive traits until a certain age.
    Context is important.

    For example if 85% of children can't see the big picture and 15% of children can.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poor Journalism
    Children can't see the big picture!!

  8. #8
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    I'm not sure if I was questioning perception exactly. Umm, I remember crying once for seeing faces in woodgrains, for example. I remember huddling in a corner, and my mom couldn't even comfort me. I kind of think my attitude was ISFP for the most part though. I drew a lot, but it was more S.. in that I was borrowing ideas from comic books and stuff. I think I had more problems understanding rules, which is just Fi. The highlight is when I broke into my elementary school once and peed on a teacher's desk, because I didn't like how he bounced girls on his lap. If there was a big picture there, it's just that I saw that authority didn't matter, and that he was of bad character. I had the moral high ground. Also, I never quite situated myself in the kind of fun other kids did. One of the best memories was when we went to a field trip and I got to hear a symphony. I can say for sure that my imagination shot into the stratosphere that day. I sat through the whole thing, not talking, just had my eyes closed the whole time, and every song produced a running story in my head. Conversely, the loneliest moment in school was a day at the park. Everyone seemed to be having fun, and I sat on the sidelines.. watching the other kids dance and jump rope to Rob Base. Even if I was S, I never could dance (I still can't unfortunately), nor did I attach myself to what present trends were occurring. I didn't like a lot of things they were into or that might have helped me be cooler.

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    OMG I love your peeing on the desk story. That is fantastic. That beats the hell out of my eight year old episode of walking out the front door stark naked after a bath because I literally forgot I had no clothes on. Ah, sweet obliviousness.

    I saw faces in the woodgrain too - I grew up in a log cabin which also had other wood paneling - except I always presumed the faces were friendly.

    My raggedy ann doll, on the other hand, was bound to come to life and attack me like that clown in Poltergeist. And this porcelain doll my grandfather bought me had it in for me too, I swear.

    That all came, of course, after I was certain that Lester from the ABC Storytime show was going to hide under my bed and inject me with poisoned needles if I fell asleep.

  10. #10

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    There was this girl I liked in primary school and my intuition told me she could be mine if I won the school tennis tournament. She was in the crowd, up the front at the finals. I lost.

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