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  1. #21
    Junior Member myexplodingcat's Avatar
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    In response to the "Does S/N really make that much of a difference?" question:

    Yes. Yes, it does.

    I have a teacher who is an ISTJ. Briefly, the situation is this. She has a bajillion deadlines that she has to meet. I'm willing to work and am relatively experienced editing, as I did editing work for my middle school newspaper (and wrote most of the stuff that went in the newspaper and literary magazine, but that's another story). I'm not familiar with all of the journalistic practices she uses, or the programs she works with, but I'm willing to learn them or figure them out somehow. Also, her inferior Ne wants her to make things new and exciting, which is good because we'd be moving forward. However, as her inferior function, it's not strong enough to operate on its own. My Ne is nearly as strong as my Ti, which is my dominant. It's a left hand to me. In other words, I could try my hand at helping her revamp things and put a fresh spin on them without much effort.

    However, that's not what she sees. Here are her functions, in case you're not totally familiar with them.
    ISTJ
    Dominant Si
    Auxiliary Te
    Tertiary Fi
    Inferior Ne
    (Left-brain alternatives Fe and Ni, and right brain alternatives Ti and Se, if you're familiar with Lenore Thomson.)

    So she looks at me and sees an overambitious kid, one who skipped eighth grade and is in high school at thirteen years old. Probably cocky, too, maybe thinks she knows everything. Most of her students are sixteen to eighteen years old... not thirteen. Probably immature, then. Hmm. Does this teacher want to spend her time teaching me? About as much as she wants to walk in molten lava. (Molten lava. What a repetitive phrase...)

    Even when she tells me to come up with a headline including my name, a verb and a subject, all of which need to fit into 29-31 points and I come up with "(my name here) Invents New Lifesaving Socks," and she starts cracking up because it's so absurd... even if her Ne finds appeal in that, her Si is still screaming, "No! Noooo!!! She's a waste of time! Don't let her fool you with flashy hat tricks! She knows nothing!" Which does nothing for my situation.

    Just for reference... my posts are much more colloquial-ish than I would ever, ever, ever write in a newspaper.

    In other words... the S/N conflict exists.
    ^ I did just say that. But I might be joking. Or asleep.

    The writing of a female and teenage INTP (!): myexplodingcat.com

    Definition of "Thinker": N. One who would rather have a solution to his problem than emotional sympathy that does nothing, because if he comes to you with a problem, he actually wants to solve it. Thinking does not equate androidism.

  2. #22
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by myexplodingcat View Post
    In response to the "Does S/N really make that much of a difference?" question:

    Yes. Yes, it does.

    I have a teacher who is an ISTJ. Briefly, the situation is this. She has a bajillion deadlines that she has to meet. I'm willing to work and am relatively experienced editing, as I did editing work for my middle school newspaper (and wrote most of the stuff that went in the newspaper and literary magazine, but that's another story). I'm not familiar with all of the journalistic practices she uses, or the programs she works with, but I'm willing to learn them or figure them out somehow. Also, her inferior Ne wants her to make things new and exciting, which is good because we'd be moving forward. However, as her inferior function, it's not strong enough to operate on its own. My Ne is nearly as strong as my Ti, which is my dominant. It's a left hand to me. In other words, I could try my hand at helping her revamp things and put a fresh spin on them without much effort.

    However, that's not what she sees. Here are her functions, in case you're not totally familiar with them.
    ISTJ
    Dominant Si
    Auxiliary Te
    Tertiary Fi
    Inferior Ne
    (Left-brain alternatives Fe and Ni, and right brain alternatives Ti and Se, if you're familiar with Lenore Thomson.)

    So she looks at me and sees an overambitious kid, one who skipped eighth grade and is in high school at thirteen years old. Probably cocky, too, maybe thinks she knows everything. Most of her students are sixteen to eighteen years old... not thirteen. Probably immature, then. Hmm. Does this teacher want to spend her time teaching me? About as much as she wants to walk in molten lava. (Molten lava. What a repetitive phrase...)

    Even when she tells me to come up with a headline including my name, a verb and a subject, all of which need to fit into 29-31 points and I come up with "(my name here) Invents New Lifesaving Socks," and she starts cracking up because it's so absurd... even if her Ne finds appeal in that, her Si is still screaming, "No! Noooo!!! She's a waste of time! Don't let her fool you with flashy hat tricks! She knows nothing!" Which does nothing for my situation.

    Just for reference... my posts are much more colloquial-ish than I would ever, ever, ever write in a newspaper.

    In other words... the S/N conflict exists.
    Wait...what's the conflict in your situation?
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  3. #23
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    I was wondering that, too.....all I see described there is assumption of motives, but friendly interaction.
    -end of thread-

  4. #24
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiharu View Post
    Not true, actually. At least not in my experience. I grew up in an all S household. ISFJ mother, xSTP father, ISTJ older brother, a full nine years older. The fact that I was an N immediately set me apart. My mom noticed right away that things that came easily to her and my brother were difficult for me. When he was young he was her little helper, very conscientious and responsible. Me, not so much. I was a stubborn little space cadet. They fight all the time now, though. In some ways the fact that we are both Ps made my father and I seem more alike, but in all major aspects we're completely different. He could never understand why I might have trouble making friends if I'm an extrovert, never imagining I might care a bit more about quality. We aren't on speaking terms anymore btw.

    My point is, Ne is my dominant function, so S/N differences are huge for me. I imagine it would be the same for all Ni, Si, and Se doms. P/J differences are often the easiest differences to observe, but I don't believe they're the most vital... well, I suppose that perhaps for Ss they're more important, where T and F become more important for Ns... but that's just a theory. Dealing with people of opposite dom is always more difficult in my opinion, though.

    Be that as it may, anyone raised in a loving household can have a wonderful home life growing up. My older brother is almost my total opposite, but he's the most amazingly good person I know. My mom is wonderful. Both of them have always seen my N qualities as a vital part of my identity, and loved me despite my differences. I do feel I understand them better than they do me, but sometimes their insights surprise me.
    That sort of reiterates the point I was trying to make, in that it really depends upon the type of sensor and intuitive interacting. If you were an Ni dealing with an Si or an xSTx, you may have less conflict on S or N lines. But because you're an xNxP dealing with mostly xSxJ's, then yes there can be some conflict. However, where an Ne-dom may have more conflicts with Si-dom, you would perhaps get along quite well with Se and feeler types. If you had ISFP's or ESFP's around, you might have found more acceptance.

    It's not strictly S or N that makes a difference, but the accompanying type preferences as well. Like I said, since it is Fi that leads me, it's not S or N that's going to be problematic in any of my relationships, but F or T, with Te-dominant types being the most difficult for me to get along with.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
    -John Green

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