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  1. #11
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortnsweet View Post
    Eh hem... post 2...

    I grew up in a household with an interesting bunch. (All in different sections of the house, we weren't all mixed together.)

    ESFJ mom
    ISTJ grandfather
    ESFP uncle
    INFP aunt
    ENFP grandmother..

    I had more conflict with the 2 J's than I ever had with the 2 N's. It wasn't any major problem, but I think that any personality related conflict in my house had more to do with J/P than S/N.

    This J conflict continued into people I lived with in my adult years. I'm a pretty extreme P at times, so I imagine that's where the issues came from. (Me, not them.)
    interesting, it could not be the S/N and could be the I/E because besides my brother being the only sensor he's also the only extrovert. Never thought of that, thank you. But I know it's not the J/P because my mom's the only J in the family, although my mom and him butted heads the most out of everyone.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    interesting, it could not be the S/N and could be the I/E because besides my brother being the only sensor he's also the only extrovert. Never thought of that, thank you. But I know it's not the J/P because my mom's the only J in the family, although my mom and him butted heads the most out of everyone.
    Well that makes sense. If she's an INxJ and he's an ESTP it could be an issue of just plain old opposites for those two. Could be ES vs. IN for the rest of the family or any number of traits/ functions.
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  3. #13
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Well, my ISFJ mom grew up with SJ parents, but all of her siblings were Ns (INTP, INFJ & ENFP), and she was with my ENTP dad for about 15 years from her teen years. The effects seem positive. She is notably more open to new things than many SJs I come across. My mom can sometimes have an NF vibe as far as her interests & attitudes, so much so that I had a hard time typing her before I knew much about the theory. I think having SJ parents possibly shielded her from feeling like an outcast though.

    She's married to an ISFP now (honorary Ns), so it's also clear she's drawn to wacky, artsy types (which my ENTP dad was also), which requires a higher level of openness. In fact, I am always surprised when I meet a stereotypical Si-dom who doesn't like anything new or strange, as my mom doesn't fit that aspect so clearly.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    I don't know that I can imagine any scenario where someone felt as though they didn't fit in simply because of their being a sensor or intuitive, regardless of what they are surrounded by, type-wise. Perhaps I'm wrong.

    Being neither an Intuitive, nor a sensor who grew up surrounded by intuitives in the household, I can't give a fair example... but I am an ISFP, who grew up in a household with an ESFP father, ISFP mother, and ESFJ sister. Of me and my sister, it was me that was the outcast. Reason being, I was always too emotional, sensitive and impulsive, often careless, and unmotivated in school. I'd say most of my not fitting in, was because I was not a role model child. In fact, I was a lot like my parents when they were younger (though how much they are aware of this, I'm uncertain.) But either way, they were parents, like most any other, that wanted a child that was sociable, made good grades, and worked hard at school. These are less to do with my being a Sensor, and more to do with the fact that I was an introvert, a feeler and a perceiver.

    I really dislike the mindset that being intuitive makes you an alien. There's a very very thin line between S and N. And we're all capable of using both, and in fact do to some degree. A more accurate reason for difference may be... being an Fi-dom dealing with a dominant Te father. Or being an Ni-dom and having to grow up in an Se-dominated household.
    I believe depending on the "type" of sensor or intuitive you are may also be a better indicator of which other sensors or intuitives you are capable of getting along with better, due to other traits.

    I personally have the most difficult time with ESTP females, but note, we're both sensors. ESTP females always see me as some weird alien, and often tease me. And I collide a lot with ENTJ males due to their overbearing Te, that conflicts with my inferior Te.
    Following this train of thought, I a scenario with say, ISFJ and ESFP parents to an ENFP child, would go on without differences and conflict. S/N would be no indicator of weirdness in their child. And an ENTJ father with a INTP mother to an ISTP child, would also prove to be without conflict.
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  5. #15
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndyAnnaJoan View Post
    I don't know that I can imagine any scenario where someone felt as though they didn't fit in simply because of their being a sensor or intuitive, regardless of what they are surrounded by, type-wise. Perhaps I'm wrong.

    Being neither an Intuitive, nor a sensor who grew up surrounded by intuitives in the household, I can't give a fair example... but I am an ISFP, who grew up in a household with an ESFP father, ISFP mother, and ESFJ sister. Of me and my sister, it was me that was the outcast. Reason being, I was always too emotional, sensitive and impulsive, often careless, and unmotivated in school. I'd say most of my not fitting in, was because I was not a role model child. In fact, I was a lot like my parents when they were younger (though how much they are aware of this, I'm uncertain.) But either way, they were parents, like most any other, that wanted a child that was sociable, made good grades, and worked hard at school. These are less to do with my being a Sensor, and more to do with the fact that I was an introvert, a feeler and a perceiver.

    I really dislike the mindset that being intuitive makes you an alien. There's a very very thin line between S and N. And we're all capable of using both, and in fact do to some degree. A more accurate reason for difference may be... being an Fi-dom dealing with a dominant Te father. Or being an Ni-dom and having to grow up in an Se-dominated household.
    I believe depending on the "type" of sensor or intuitive you are may also be a better indicator of which other sensors or intuitives you are capable of getting along with better, due to other traits.

    I personally have the most difficult time with ESTP females, but note, we're both sensors. ESTP females always see me as some weird alien, and often tease me. And I collide a lot with ENTJ males due to their overbearing Te, that conflicts with my inferior Te.
    Following this train of thought, I a scenario with say, ISFJ and ESFP parents to an ENFP child, would go on without differences and conflict. S/N would be no indicator of weirdness in their child. And an ENTJ father with a INTP mother to an ISTP child, would also prove to be without conflict.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member StrawMan's Avatar
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    Well, at least when S's go to school, they get in an environment where most other kids will be S's.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by StrawMan View Post
    Well, at least when S's go to school, they get in an environment where most other kids will be S's.
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  8. #18
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    (I'm not trying to have a pissing contest, I posted this because I'm tired of N's bitching how hard life is because they grew up in an all S household, and assuming that S's who grew up in all N household had it easier)
    I think it's a fair question, but I'm guessing it's not JUST N/S that comes into play in a major way.

    For example, my ESTJ cousin was endlessly frustrated with his family growing up -- both of his parents, as well as his brother, are ISxP's (possibly all three ISTP's, although his father is the one who might be an ISFP). My cousin, being quite an extrovert, as well as a hardcore STJ, was definitely the odd man out and became impatient & annoyed with their I-ness as well as their P-ness. lol. He just had such different concerns and preoccupations/priorities than all of them.

    Edit: But, for me, yes, having two SJ parents definitely made a difference for me, and the N/S thing was obvious (and thankfully I had an INTP brother to alleviate that a bit). Which is why I think the OP's question is interesting/good - is it the same for S's with two N parents?
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  9. #19
    Senior Member Chiharu's Avatar
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    I don't know that I can imagine any scenario where someone felt as though they didn't fit in simply because of their being a sensor or intuitive, regardless of what they are surrounded by, type-wise. Perhaps I'm wrong.

    Being neither an Intuitive, nor a sensor who grew up surrounded by intuitives in the household, I can't give a fair example... but I am an ISFP, who grew up in a household with an ESFP father, ISFP mother, and ESFJ sister. Of me and my sister, it was me that was the outcast. Reason being, I was always too emotional, sensitive and impulsive, often careless, and unmotivated in school. I'd say most of my not fitting in, was because I was not a role model child. In fact, I was a lot like my parents when they were younger (though how much they are aware of this, I'm uncertain.) But either way, they were parents, like most any other, that wanted a child that was sociable, made good grades, and worked hard at school. These are less to do with my being a Sensor, and more to do with the fact that I was an introvert, a feeler and a perceiver.

    I really dislike the mindset that being intuitive makes you an alien. There's a very very thin line between S and N. And we're all capable of using both, and in fact do to some degree. A more accurate reason for difference may be... being an Fi-dom dealing with a dominant Te father. Or being an Ni-dom and having to grow up in an Se-dominated household.
    I believe depending on the "type" of sensor or intuitive you are may also be a better indicator of which other sensors or intuitives you are capable of getting along with better, due to other traits.

    I personally have the most difficult time with ESTP females, but note, we're both sensors. ESTP females always see me as some weird alien, and often tease me. And I collide a lot with ENTJ males due to their overbearing Te, that conflicts with my inferior Te.
    Following this train of thought, I a scenario with say, ISFJ and ESFP parents to an ENFP child, would go on without differences and conflict. S/N would be no indicator of weirdness in their child. And an ENTJ father with a INTP mother to an ISTP child, would also prove to be without conflict.
    Not true, actually. At least not in my experience. I grew up in an all S household. ISFJ mother, xSTP father, ISTJ older brother, a full nine years older. The fact that I was an N immediately set me apart. My mom noticed right away that things that came easily to her and my brother were difficult for me. When he was young he was her little helper, very conscientious and responsible. Me, not so much. I was a stubborn little space cadet. They fight all the time now, though. In some ways the fact that we are both Ps made my father and I seem more alike, but in all major aspects we're completely different. He could never understand why I might have trouble making friends if I'm an extrovert, never imagining I might care a bit more about quality. We aren't on speaking terms anymore btw.

    My point is, Ne is my dominant function, so S/N differences are huge for me. I imagine it would be the same for all Ni, Si, and Se doms. P/J differences are often the easiest differences to observe, but I don't believe they're the most vital... well, I suppose that perhaps for Ss they're more important, where T and F become more important for Ns... but that's just a theory. Dealing with people of opposite dom is always more difficult in my opinion, though.

    Be that as it may, anyone raised in a loving household can have a wonderful home life growing up. My older brother is almost my total opposite, but he's the most amazingly good person I know. My mom is wonderful. Both of them have always seen my N qualities as a vital part of my identity, and loved me despite my differences. I do feel I understand them better than they do me, but sometimes their insights surprise me.

  10. #20
    Senior Member tinker683's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    Well, my ISFJ mom grew up with SJ parents, but all of her siblings were Ns (INTP, INFJ & ENFP), and she was with my ENTP dad for about 15 years from her teen years. The effects seem positive. She is notably more open to new things than many SJs I come across. My mom can sometimes have an NF vibe as far as her interests & attitudes, so much so that I had a hard time typing her before I knew much about the theory. I think having SJ parents possibly shielded her from feeling like an outcast though.

    She's married to an ISFP now (honorary Ns), so it's also clear she's drawn to wacky, artsy types (which my ENTP dad was also), which requires a higher level of openness. In fact, I am always surprised when I meet a stereotypical Si-dom who doesn't like anything new or strange, as my mom doesn't fit that aspect so clearly.
    My mother (and hell, me to some extent) is/are the same way.

    My mother is an ISFx (I suspect J but sometimes I see a lot of Fi in here so I sometimes think ISFP), my father and older brother is an ENFP, and two younger brothers are ISTP and ENTP.

    I think having a lot of N's in the household as it helped me see a lot of things from the way N's tend too. My Dad was actually more conservative than my Mom (go figure) and while I consider myself a conservative, I'm not at all the massively social conservative that ISFJs are often typecasted as. I credit that someone to my own ISFJ mother (who is very similar to OrangedAppled) but mostly my ENFP father and older brother.

    Makes me wonder sometimes how my really good relationship with my father has influence my own attitudes and feelings toward ENFx's. Makes me think that's maybe why I tend to get along with them so well
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