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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by GZA View Post
    Thats very interesting... I'll reread it and comment more later. I do think I probably don't go for things as fearlessly as many people, and it may be due to introvertedness (or possibly a host of other factors). I'm working on fixing it though.
    When you say "fearless" are you just referring to "shyness" in social situations? I don't think that's the same thing as introversion. I relate very much to the biological aspects of sensory overload, etc. That sensory overload is physically and mentally draining... so any "shyness" is really irrelevant.

  2. #32
    Senior Membrane spirilis's Avatar
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    I recall a couple years ago finding the website of a Jungian type expert named Katherine Benziger, and one of the articles on her website mentioned this theory in detail based on a study she linked--something to do with sensory sensitivity and the spinal cord I think, with the hint that this may influence one's tendency towards introversion and extroversion. Then her website was totally redone and I lost the links. Now it looks nothing like the previous revisions-- benziger.org (kudos to anyone who finds an article there matching what I just described)

    There was another article there which talked about the perils of "falsification of type"... living and playing out roles in your life that are not ideal for your particular personality type, and the kind of anxiety/mental disorders that can be attributed to such.

    ---
    edit: nm, not that hard to find
    benziger.org has articles - click the link, go to "More Information" (the site doesn't seem to let you link to its content)

    "The Physiology of Type: Introversion and Extroversion"

    and for the other one-
    "The Physiology of Falsification of Type"
    And this is also cool--not sure if I'd seen it before: "The Physiology of Type: Jung's Four Functions"
    Wow, this last link is very interesting. I need to make a new post out of this.

  3. #33
    Resident Snot-Nose GZA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seanan View Post
    When you say "fearless" are you just referring to "shyness" in social situations? I don't think that's the same thing as introversion. I relate very much to the biological aspects of sensory overload, etc. That sensory overload is physically and mentally draining... so any "shyness" is really irrelevant.
    I agree with you wholeheartedly that shyness and introversion are not the same... that actually might be my number one most disliked misconception about introversion, actually.

    I suppose "fearlessly" wasn't the right word. What I mean is that some people I know and just get up and go after something because they are more immersed in the space around them. I am more like an observer, I feel like I'm outside of my surroundings, so I have to kind of break the attachment to really go after something sometimes... Its not neccesarily a social thing, either.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by GZA View Post
    I agree with you wholeheartedly that shyness and introversion are not the same... that actually might be my number one most disliked misconception about introversion, actually.

    I suppose "fearlessly" wasn't the right word. What I mean is that some people I know and just get up and go after something because they are more immersed in the space around them. I am more like an observer, I feel like I'm outside of my surroundings, so I have to kind of break the attachment to really go after something sometimes... Its not neccesarily a social thing, either.
    I think I know what you mean. For instance, in a crowd or social gathering, I usually see something about to happen when others don't because I'm not immersed in the activities... yes, I'm observing. That has actually protected me in a couple of situations when something really bad happened. Is that it?

  5. #35
    Senior Member Jade Curtiss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seanan View Post
    I know you said you don't wish to address this as much as the rest but, to me, it is critically important. These ascertions are so invalid that I have to question all the rest that went before it in the testing. It smacks of major subjectivity, thus, indicating the rest may not be that objective. Happiness or lack of it is based on social activity? As a "biological introvert," I strongly disagree. Happiness is a by-product of actualizing choices. As for "rewards," stated as pertaining to I/E... to me its a matter of quantity vs quality. I find the extrovert less intense. Their experience more diffuse. Example: Strong background activity or loud background noise while conversing with multiple people disallows biological/mental intense focus on any of them.... preferred by the extrovert as "energizing." For an introvert, these are described as "distracting" implying a desire for intense focus. Following that line of thought, what an introvert experiences has more intensity and that includes happiness. Abundance is offset by a deeper experience of less. Therefore, I would say, they are equal but arrived at differently.
    Exactly. Introverts receive greater satisfaction from focused, selective endeavors that they can explore in-depth, while extraverts enjoy a variety of stimulating activities without feeling the need to focus too deeply on any one subject. Breadth vs depth and extensive vs intensive are two keyword contrasts between extraversion and introversion. This matter also seems to be affected by P/J preference as well to an extent, with ExxPs/sanguines being the most scattered ("dabblers"), and IxxJs/melancholics being the most focused.

    The biological basis for introversion/extraversion is pretty complex, involving several factors, but it certainly exists. The Introvert Advantage by Marti Olsen Laney is an excellent book on introversion that is extremely comprehensive in describing the outer traits of each orientation, and giving advice for introverts on how to manage their life effectively in an extraverted society. One section also goes into detail on the research done on the biological basis for each orientation.

    The physiological basis for this aspect of temperament is connected to the D4DR gene, known as the "novelty seeking gene" located on the 11th chromosone. Studies found that self-reported extraverts had longer D4DR genes and were less sensitive to the neurotransmittor dopamine (involved in energy levels, physical activity, alertness, active learning and motivation) meaning they required greater stimulus to satisfy their need for dopamine and adrenaline levels, which increase dopamine. Introverts had shorter D4DR genes which were more sensitive to dopamine and thus didn't require as much excitement to satisfy their needs as extraverts.

    Another test had participants injected with tiny amounts of radiation which were monitered and shown to take different pathways through the bloodstream and brain depending the individual's temperement. The introvert's brain showed higher activity levels and the blood took a longer, more complex route through the brain compared to the extravert's. The introverted path traveled through the hippocampus (involved in long-term memory), frontal lobe, and ended at the amygdala while the extraverts ended quickly at the temporal and motor center, which is connected to short-term memory. The extravert's pathway was activated by dopamine while the introvert's was activated by the neurotransmitter acetycholine, which is involved in sustaining a calm and alert feeling, long-term memory, and increases positive feelings when engaged in thinking and reflecting. Acetycholine gives introverts "hap hits" when they can rest in peaceful contemplation.

    Extravert's autonomic nervous system was also found to correlate with activation of the sympathetic system (commonly called the "fight or flight" response) while introversion correlated withe the parasympathetic nervous system, a "cool-down" mode where bodily functions relax and digestion occurs. Various other biological responses were connected to each autonomic nervous system, such as pupils dilating or constricting and blood pressure and heart rate increasing or decreasing.

    I've also heard there is biological evidence for the P/J difference, which I find interesting because I've always identified most strongly with the Introversion and Percieving preferences, which happen to be the two dichotomies with a (somewhat) proven physiological basis...
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  6. #36
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    Considering that both E/I and J/P are said to be the first letters that develop (become apparent) in a child, that would make sense that they would have biological connections. And while E/I is "expressiveness", which is about the stimulation you [actively] "seek", the other factor would be "responsiveness", which is about how much you [passively] "want", and J/P would figure in that. (Such as being more open vs being more decisive).
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