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  1. #11
    Glycerine
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    ENFJs tend to be short and to the point unless something really interests us.

  2. #12
    Anew Leaf
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    I have noticed a difference in writing styles between NTs and NFs so far as writing literature goes.

    For instance I feel confident that Neil Gaimen is some sort of INTX. I enjoy his unique perspective but I feel like there is a lack of emotion with his characters. This disconnect usually keeps me from fully immersing into his works.

    Whereas if I read an NF book, I am much more drawn into the book and characters.

    I dated an ENTP for a number of years and we both are writers. It was interesting to both of us to see our wildly different approaches on characters and plot. His stories were extremely strange with a bent on being offensive to anyone he could offend and usually pretty funny. The flip side being he had terrible transitions between thoughts and stayed as far away from "happy" feelings as he could.

  3. #13
    011235813
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    Neil Gaiman's got crazy Ne. I'm tempted to go with INTP for him.

  4. #14
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    INFP = Emily Bronte
    INFJ = Charlotte Bronte

    I find it interesting as an NFP that I relate much more intensely to the writings of the INFP Bronte sister. I think preferences for content and structure could even be affected by the functions.

    I dunno, I'm too tired at the moment to think about it much more than that at the moment. I've been told that people can see Si and Te in my posts, but that Ne comes up constantly in the form of "what if" type questioning scenarios and bizarre non-sequitrs.

  5. #15
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    I notice that Ni types are generally less long-winded than Ne types when it comes to forum posting. Extroverts are more likely to turn threads into social exchanges and introverts seem more likely to stay on-topic & explore it deeper.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  6. #16
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    INFP = Emily Bronte
    INFJ = Charlotte Bronte

    I find it interesting as an NFP that I relate much more intensely to the writings of the INFP Bronte sister. I think preferences for content and structure could even be affected by the functions.
    I usually adore NFP writers, but in this case I prefer Charlotte over Emily.
    INFP 4w5 so/sp

    I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas;
    they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

    - Emily Bronte

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    I usually adore NFP writers, but in this case I prefer Charlotte over Emily.
    I think Emily Bronte was a genius. It's not just darkness for the sake of darkness - I think she had an incredible abstract understanding of human nature and why people do what they do. I'm not sure she was in sync with her times or if she believed in "evil" because most people didn't understand Wuthering Heights when it was published and thought it was immoral. Even now some people don't seem to grasp that it's not a romance novel advocating wife beating and cruelty. Emily Bronte examined *why* broken people are the way they are, saw them as human and told their stories, no matter how messy, instead of demonizing them. She also made it funny, I have yet to see a cinematic version that does real justice to her black humor.

    Charlotte Bronte is okay, I mean she's a good story teller, but she kind of bores me. On the other hand, Wuthering Heights is in my top five favorite works of fiction of all time, actually more like top three, and sometimes I would say number one...but that's a constantly shifting position, it's hard for me to say THIS! THIS WORK OF LITERATURE IS DEFINITIVELY SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS!

    I really love Pushkin and Goethe and Henry Miller too much to try to decide like that...Emily Bronte's characters are very real to me, and that means something, which is why I'm tempted to leave it in the top spot.

    /ramble

  8. #18
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    I think Emily Bronte was a genius. It's not just darkness for the sake of darkness - I think she had an incredible abstract understanding of human nature and why people do what they do. I'm not sure she was in sync with her times or if she believed in "evil" because most people didn't understand Wuthering Heights when it was published and thought it was immoral. Even now some people don't seem to grasp that it's not a romance novel advocating wife beating and cruelty. Emily Bronte examined *why* broken people are the way they are, saw them as human and told their stories, no matter how messy, instead of demonizing them. She also made it funny, I have yet to see a cinematic version that does real justice to her black humor.

    Charlotte Bronte is okay, I mean she's a good story teller, but she kind of bores me.
    I think Emily was more talented in an artistic sense, but I enjoy Charlotte's novels better & definitely think she had interesting ideas to convey. Wuthering Heights has more artistic merit to me than it is a pleasure to read. That style of writing dialect speech for some characters grates on my nerves a LOT. I also find the characters totally unlikable, but that in itself garners my respect (they're the opposite of Mary Sues).

    I agree on their typings though.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  9. #19
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    I think Emily Bronte was a genius. It's not just darkness for the sake of darkness - I think she had an incredible abstract understanding of human nature and why people do what they do. I'm not sure she was in sync with her times or if she believed in "evil" because most people didn't understand Wuthering Heights when it was published and thought it was immoral. Even now some people don't seem to grasp that it's not a romance novel advocating wife beating and cruelty. Emily Bronte examined *why* broken people are the way they are, saw them as human and told their stories, no matter how messy, instead of demonizing them. She also made it funny, I have yet to see a cinematic version that does real justice to her black humor.
    Oh, don't get me wrong, I so agree with you here. Awesome succinct analysis BTW

    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    I think Emily was more talented in an artistic sense, but I enjoy Charlotte's novels better & definitely think she had interesting ideas to convey. Wuthering Heights has more artistic merit to me than it is a pleasure to read. That style of writing dialect speech for some characters grates on my nerves a LOT. I also find the characters totally unlikable, but that in itself garners my respect (they're the opposite of Mary Sues).

    I agree on their typings though.
    THIS

    Stop it will you. Its rude to constantly steal people's thoughts and claim them as your own...

    INFP 4w5 so/sp

    I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas;
    they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

    - Emily Bronte

  10. #20
    Glycerine
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    So I was wondering if this seemed like classic ENFJ (in the writing style) just for the fun of it.
    It is about Camus and the absurd.

    Albert Camus
    Camus’ passage from the book, The Myth of Sisyphus discusses what constitutes an absurd life. First, an “absence of hope (which has nothing to do with despair)” must exist. Next, one must have a “continual rejection (which must not be confused with renunciation)”. Then, one must have “conscious dissatisfaction (which must not be compared with immature unrest”. In all these requirements, there lies an undercurrent of detaching one’s self from having expectations and gaining freedom. For example, if one does not have hope or despair about a specific outcome (ex. who won the football game?), then he becomes an objective participant with no expectations. Without expectations, a person frees himself to create whatever reality suits him while still acknowledging the main reality (this applies to the other requirements of continual rejection and conscious dissatisfaction). In other words, the person lives in the moment and let goes of any attachment to a situation in order to control his own destiny. Ironically, even though a person liberates himself from having a purpose (an attachment) in life, the freedom to choose his own path gives him a reason to live. As a result, the will to live should solely come from one’s self and not from anything external such as the concern for others or aiming to become the next Bill Gates. However, if anything “destroys, conjures away, or exorcises these requirements”, then people will fall into the trappings of the main reality, get attached to situations (ex. becoming hopeful or full of despair), could potentially fight for hopeless causes and/or commit suicide (which Camus considers to be the serious philosophical problem). This would lead to the downfall of the absurd. Although Camus’ absurdist philosophy has a depressing tone to it, it probably gave people of war-torn France a way to cope with the atrocities occurring in their country and all over Europe. It also holds relevance today and to the future because we will always have struggles.

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