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  1. #1
    Luctor et emergo Ezra's Avatar
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    Default Dichotomically close call

    The problem with the way in which we test using MBTI is that it doesn't quite work when connecting your 'letters' to your actual type. Consider the following scenario:

    You are an ISFx. You normally score as ISFP, but recently, J has become more evident. So what does this mean, you suddenly go from having Fi and Se to having Si and Fe as dominant and auxiliary functions respectively? It means your whole psychological makeup changes, just because of the way in which you're scoring? Of course not. This is why, as Splittet often professes, typing by functions is far more effective. It makes much more sense, and is so much more logically consistent.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ezra View Post
    The problem with the way in which we test using MBTI is that it doesn't quite work when connecting your 'letters' to your actual type. Consider the following scenario:

    You are an ISFx. You normally score as ISFP, but recently, J has become more evident. So what does this mean, you suddenly go from having Fi and Se to having Si and Fe as dominant and auxiliary functions respectively? It means your whole psychological makeup changes, just because of the way in which you're scoring? Of course not. This is why, as Splittet often professes, typing by functions is far more effective. It makes much more sense, and is so much more logically consistent.
    No. The official MBTI test is better. Just take several measures.

    Function typing is prone to more biases.

  3. #3
    Senior Member OctaviaCaesar's Avatar
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    I know that as we age, we integrate our preferred and non-preferred functions in our consciousness. I don't think this changes a person's original preference, it simply "rounds him out," so to speak.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Grayscale's Avatar
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    speaking from experience, i have found the testing and type descriptions to be largely subject to interpretation. since there is no "right" answer except to correctly match yourself to one of the answers, how you answer depends on not only how realistic you are with yourself, but more importantly your conceptual understanding of the question and the answers.

    when looking at cognitive functions, it was extremely easy for me to identify my primary function, as well as two modes of thinking i have in terms of secondary and tertiary functions (Se w/ Ni and Ne w/ Si). Unsurprisingly these correlated to two type descriptions that i was relatively split between due to testing both ways and identifying with parts from both descriptions.

  5. #5
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
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    I was thinking about this recently. There might be something about having a high preference for closure (J) that causes one to internalize their intuition (Ni) or sens...ation (Si) and externalize their decision-making functions (Te/Fe). If that's the case, then yes, you would expect a reorganization of function-preference. I can see it happening. Why not? Personality isn't that stable anyway, imo.

  6. #6
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    I've thought about this at times, when it comes to my own personality. In my early 20's, I would test as INTJ and even recognized much of myself in the INTJ descriptions - at that time. Now? Not at all. (however, there was also a lot about the theory that I did not understand back then, and this included F stereotypes, and my taking the test thinking that there was no way I could be an F; but, as a child, there was almost zilch NT temperament to my personality - so perhaps I was just in my Ti phase in my early 20's).

    Because much of my life to date has been internal, it's highly possible I've done so much thinking/reflecting/philosophizing/etc that I've consciously switched some of my functions and rejected others, based on life experiences that have come my way. I've thought about this. I do think that a lot is possible when it comes to re-ordering/rewiring your internal world and perceptions, if you so desire it.

    And to me, if over time someone does 'balance out' many of their functions, and their personality becomes less extreme, then can't they, for all intents and purposes, 'be' a different personality at that point?? I mean, they're certainly different from where they started. I guess it depends on how one wants to use mbti theory, or how one views it. If one is using the theory in an attempt to predict behavior and look for overall patterns, then if a person has evolved over time, far enough from where they started, so that both others as well as themselves view themselves in a new light...then in effect could they 'be' a new personality? (in terms of the 16 types - obviously they're still the same living being) Maybe. I mean, say someone's starting point is INTJ. By the time they're 60, they may have shed so many of the typical INTJ traits, and brought in many other traits to complement their 'baseline', that in effect, are they still an INTJ? What if when they're 60, they read the INTJ description and it's meaningless to them because they don't even behave like that anymore, or have broadened their functions so much that the description (and even theory?) is worthless?

    Oh, but I know most of the other arguments about this, that one is always the same personality, that never changes, under stress the 'true'/more instinctual traits will come out..etc...people tend to balance and mature over time, and an INTJ at 60 is going to still have a distinctively different flavor than an ESFJ at 60...which is true. Sorry, I think I'm wasting everyones' time here.

    I'm just musing. There are definitely many other ways of looking at it. These are just some of the weird thoughts I have. ;-) Basically, I view the human personality as flowing and evolving over time. I guess too it depends on how one as an individual views themselves. Many might not even desire to 'grow' or balance themselves out, in which case they'll stay pretty constant. Some might view building up ones' strengths as the most effective method of reaching their potential, which would also mean they wouldn't suddenly 'morph' into another type; others might view working on lesser traits as the more effective goal, and that's where the personality type might become murkier.

    I go back and forth quite a bit on the usefulness and validity of many of these personality theories, but it's definitely interesting stuff.

    P.S. I completely understand if no one can follow what I am saying!
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    I agree with pretty much everything you've said.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  8. #8
    no clinkz 'til brooklyn Nocapszy's Avatar
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    In light of his OP I'd like to invite Ezra into my club. It's a club of people who aren't stupid.

    Thank goodness for someone other than dissonance and splittet finally fucking getting it.
    we fukin won boys

  9. #9
    Rats off to ya! Mort Belfry's Avatar
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    I hate it when people say things like, "I'm an INTJ, but I'm quite P, maybe I'm an INTP sometimes." MBTI comes down to the eight functions, people aren't P'ish or J'ish, they just either have dominant Ti, Fi, Ne & Se or dominant Te, Fe, Ni & Si.

    Some people seem to chop and change from one type to another. It's like they're saying their inborn dominant functions have changed from one day to the next. I think people should really study MBTI before making these choices in the first place instead of changing five weeks later. I'm sorry to say it, but ALL of these people are ESFPs.
    Why do we always come here?

    I guess we'll never know.

    It's like a kind of torture,
    To have to watch this show.

  10. #10
    Luctor et emergo Ezra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mort Belfry View Post
    I hate it when people say things like, "I'm an INTJ, but I'm quite P, maybe I'm an INTP sometimes." MBTI comes down to the eight functions, people aren't P'ish or J'ish, they just either have dominant Ti, Fi, Ne & Se or dominant Te, Fe, Ni & Si.

    Some people seem to chop and change from one type to another. It's like they're saying their inborn dominant functions have changed from one day to the next. I think people should really study MBTI before making these choices in the first place instead of changing five weeks later. I'm sorry to say it, but ALL of these people are ESFPs.
    You legend.

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