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Thread: MBTI by Escher

  1. #1
    Senior Member Blackwater's Avatar
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    Default MBTI by Escher

    I came across this picture and had kind of an intuitive moment. I think this might serve as a very good rendition of how the psyche can be seduced by jungian typology. Of course, you shouldn't take this to mean that the MBTI is useless or anything. Just that sometimes, we all go a little overboard in our use of typology.

    best collection of philosopher typings online

    http://www.celebritytypes.com/philosophers/

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    Enigma Nadir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackwater View Post
    Of course, you shouldn't take this to mean that the MBTI is useless or anything.
    Inherently it is.
    Not really.

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    you are right mippus's Avatar
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    Esher is brilliant!
    And indeed, there is no harm in reminding ourselves of the relative nature of typologies...
    Vanitas vanitatum omnia vanitas

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    Senior Member marm's Avatar
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    All knowledge is relative, but this doesn't make the striving for knowledge useless. I hope everyone already knows that. I suppose its good for some people to be reminded of it, but I find myself to be pretty obsessed with relativitism as it is. My problem is that I can get stuck in my own subjective experience which is as relative as one can get. Systems like typology are important to me because they give me some semi-objective(ie collective) reference points. Typology is a lot less relative than most things people base their lives on.

    The other way I keep from getting lost in relative systems is by having multiple relative systems that each act as an external reference point for the others. Multiple perspectives is the closest thing that humans can come to objectivity.

    The problem with a system like typology is people become obsessed with it and identify with it... instead of using it. Typology is just about patterns, and these patterns are as much about how people create systematized theories as it is about patterns of personality types.

    The only times I usually think about typology are when I'm on a typology forum or when I'm reading a typology book. If someone asked me about myself, the first thing to come to mind wouldn't be that I'm INFP.

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    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackwater View Post
    I came across this picture and had kind of an intuitive moment. I think this might serve as a very good rendition of how the psyche can be seduced by jungian typology. Of course, you shouldn't take this to mean that the MBTI is useless or anything. Just that sometimes, we all go a little overboard in our use of typology.
    I don't see anything unusual about that picture, except for the castle-like structure being so close to the homes, the unusual plants, and the chiseled fortress in the cliff off to the side. What is it supposed to convey about MBTI? That it has bizarre elements?

    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade View Post
    Multiple perspectives is the closest thing that humans can come to objectivity.
    I would have to agree with you on that, marmalade. I always have to express my ideas to other people and get certain kinds of responses to feel that it actually made any sense. Because for all I know, it might well have been gibberish to them if I don't get a response that seems to indicate comprehension and acknowledgment.

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    you are right mippus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by athenian200 View Post
    I don't see anything unusual about that picture, except for the castle-like structure being so close to the homes, the unusual plants, and the chiseled fortress in the cliff off to the side. What is it supposed to convey about MBTI? That it has bizarre elements?
    Follow the flow of the water...
    Vanitas vanitatum omnia vanitas

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    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mippus View Post
    Follow the flow of the water...
    Hey... the water's not flowing right. It seems to cycle back on itself somehow. It's as if it somehow reaches the top, falls down to power the wheel, and then flows down somehow reaching the top and... falls again? That doesn't make sense, the slope would either be such that it fell in the first place to power the wheel and then drained off downwards rather than back upwards, or else the water shouldn't fall because it's already flowed down rather than upwards. It seems to exploit two kinds of perspective on the same object, which isn't possible in reality, but is possible in the drawing due to how the rules of perspective work. The problem is that there are no pumps in this picture. If the water were pumped and recycled, it might make sense, but then if you can power the pumps, why do you need a waterwheel? This picture makes no sense.

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    you are right mippus's Avatar
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    That is why I love Esher's work so much.
    That it doesn't make real sense is the beauty of it.
    Vanitas vanitatum omnia vanitas

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    Enigma Nadir's Avatar
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    Yep. That's the idea.
    Not really.

  10. #10
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mippus View Post
    That is why I love Esher's work so much.
    That it doesn't make real sense is the beauty of it.
    So... what does it mean? That things that seem like reasonable/normal assumptions at first may actually be wrong, but no one notices because they seem okay until you examine them closely?

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