User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 59

  1. #31
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ISFJ
    Posts
    6,020

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Weber View Post
    They are all of those things, and having a plan and being effective is a sin here as well. Hipsters and modern pseudo-hippies abound.
    I'd need to hear that from a Danish ENFP I'm afraid :P

    I do know you guys are supposed to be the happiest country in the world, so you're definitely more ENFP than Japan...

  2. #32
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,939

    Default

    I love Finland, so some of the comments here made me a bit sad. but it's a childhood thing for me as I spent a lot of time there as a child (visiting my grandmother). I just remember it as peaceful and nature-oriented, with interesting culture and history. And I had some warm and loving people around me, my grandmother and my mom's and grandmother's friends.

    It definitely seems to be true that Scandinavians, and perhaps Finns especially, are rather over-introverted and reserved as a whole and they rely far too much on alcohol to overcome that. Which is kinda sad too. It causes so many problems. I live in London, and I have to say that the Scandinavians I've met here (mostly Swedes) are pretty much drunk all the time when you meet them socially and acting like they have few morals or inhibitions. (They seem to get along particularly well with, and behave like, many of the Antipodeans.) Which is the opposite to the stereotype, but perhaps it conforms to the "drunk Scandinavian" stereotype.

    I haven't really known enough Finns since childhood to be able to comment on them. My mom is an INTJ and it's almost as though she is her own nationality. She is one of the most individual people I know. She has lived in Canada for well over half her life now but does not remotely consider herself Canadian. I don't know if she even considers herself very Finnish.

    One of my best friends (Canadian) is married to a Japanese guy and lives there. She finds aspects of it challenging but basically likes it - she's also INFJ. She likes the way that people show respect for each other and have ritualised social graces to make things run more smoothly for everyone. Although I find Japan very foreign (I've been once and am going again this year) I did love it when I visited - it might be too unfamiliar with me but for the type of person I am I could see many advantages.
    Female
    INFJ
    Enneagram 6w5 sp/sx


    I DOORSLAMMING

  3. #33
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ISFJ
    Posts
    6,020

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SilkRoad View Post
    I love Finland, so some of the comments here made me a bit sad. but it's a childhood thing for me as I spent a lot of time there as a child (visiting my grandmother). I just remember it as peaceful and nature-oriented, with interesting culture and history. And I had some warm and loving people around me, my grandmother and my mom's and grandmother's friends.

    It definitely seems to be true that Scandinavians, and perhaps Finns especially, are rather over-introverted and reserved as a whole and they rely far too much on alcohol to overcome that. Which is kinda sad too. It causes so many problems. I live in London, and I have to say that the Scandinavians I've met here (mostly Swedes) are pretty much drunk all the time when you meet them socially and acting like they have few morals or inhibitions. (They seem to get along particularly well with, and behave like, many of the Antipodeans.) Which is the opposite to the stereotype, but perhaps it conforms to the "drunk Scandinavian" stereotype.

    I haven't really known enough Finns since childhood to be able to comment on them. My mom is an INTJ and it's almost as though she is her own nationality. She is one of the most individual people I know. She has lived in Canada for well over half her life now but does not remotely consider herself Canadian. I don't know if she even considers herself very Finnish.

    One of my best friends (Canadian) is married to a Japanese guy and lives there. She finds aspects of it challenging but basically likes it - she's also INFJ. She likes the way that people show respect for each other and have ritualised social graces to make things run more smoothly for everyone. Although I find Japan very foreign (I've been once and am going again this year) I did love it when I visited - it might be too unfamiliar with me but for the type of person I am I could see many advantages.

    I do think FJs are more likely to understand Japanese social rituals. Certainly a lot more than an FP

  4. #34
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    I do think FJs are more likely to understand Japanese social rituals. Certainly a lot more than an FP
    Yes, definitely agree with that!
    Female
    INFJ
    Enneagram 6w5 sp/sx


    I DOORSLAMMING

  5. #35
    Senior Member StrawMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    The greater southern Appalachian region (especially West Virginia, Kentucky, and the mountainous parts of Tennessee and Virginia) is traditionally an introverted culture because of the isolation of the mountains.
    So, would isolation play a big part in developing an introverted culture? Japan is a group of islands, Finland is quite isolated country...

  6. #36
    Senor Membrane
    Join Date
    May 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StrawMan View Post
    So, would isolation play a big part in developing an introverted culture? Japan is a group of islands, Finland is quite isolated country...
    Here it is also shaped by the low density in the past. There is this, I don't know what... maybe proverb kinda story about the personality living in a hut in the middle of the forest. "When a woodchip comes down the stream, he heads upstream with an axe" not to help the stranger cut wood, I might add... Anyhow, I think this can be seen when comparing Japanese and Finnish cultures. Japanese seem to be warm to the people they deal with regularly. Finns are isolated from each other as well. We don't have very long tradition of having people around us.

  7. #37
    Junior Member minus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    14

    Default

    This thread reminded me of two things. First was the article quoted below which, while I realize it isn't perfectly on topic; it can flesh out a lot of what's already been said.

    Like individuals, cultures have different styles. America is a noisy culture, unlike, say, Finland, which values silence. Individualism, dominant in the U.S. and Germany, promotes the direct, fast-paced style of communication associated with extraversion. Collectivistic societies, such as those in East Asia, value privacy and restraint, qualities more characteristic of introverts.

    According to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator personality test administered to two randomized national samples, introverts make up 50 percent of the U.S. population. The MBTI definition of introversion—a preference for solitude, reflection, internal exploration of ideas vs. active engagement and pursuit of rewards in the external/social world—correlates closely with the Big Five description. But the results still surprise; if every other person is an introvert, why doesn't the cultural tone reflect that?

    It's not just that we overestimate the numbers of extraverts in our midst because they're more salient. The bias of individuals is reinforced in the media, which emphasize the visual, the talkative, and the sound bite— immediacy over reflection.

    "In verbal cultures, remaining silent presents a problem," report Anio Sallinen-Kuparinen, James McCroskey, and Virginia Richmond, who have studied communication styles in the U.S. and Finland. Perceptions of competence tend to be based on verbal behavior. An introvert who is silent in a group may actually be quite engaged—taking in what is said, thinking about it, waiting for a turn to speak—but will be seen in the U.S. as a poor communicator.

    When psychologists Catherine Caldwell-Harris and Ayse Ayçiçegi compared U.S. and Turkish samples, they found that having "an orientation inconsistent with societal values" is a risk factor for poor mental health. The findings support what the researchers call the personality-culture clash hypothesis: "Psychological adjustment depends on the degree of match between personality and the values of surrounding society."

    (source)
    The second was the anecdote of a Scandinavian friend of mine who recounted how extroverts often became habitual drinkers, if not alcoholics, because in that instance it became socially acceptable to be loud, outgoing, and even downright sociable. That is to say, more themselves. Come to think of it, there's quite a bit of that here in middle-of-nowhere Wisconsin too.
    The task of thinking is to live with doubt in the service of understanding, rather than living with certainty in the preservation of ignorance.

  8. #38
    Senor Membrane
    Join Date
    May 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,190

    Default

    "Psychological adjustment depends on the degree of match between personality and the values of surrounding society."
    This seems to be an important theme in my life.

    The second was the anecdote of a Scandinavian friend of mine who recounted how extroverts often became habitual drinkers, if not alcoholics, because in that instance it became socially acceptable to be loud, outgoing, and even downright sociable.
    Hmm... I'm not sure how it would turn out if we had statistics about drinking an extroversion. Sure, the extroverts will be found in bars more often, but would they need to drink that much? If you're an extrovert, it should be enough to hang around with drinking people and you could pretty much be as extroverted as you like. On the other hand, there are a lot of people who drink at home mostly.

  9. #39
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Posts
    40

    Default

    I guess it depends on the motivation for drinking. Introverts might drink to become more sociable whilst extraverts might drink to tone down their sociability.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    ISFP 9w1
    9-2-5

  10. #40
    Senor Membrane
    Join Date
    May 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by esfpmary View Post
    extraverts might drink to tone down their sociability.


    Umm... how would that work? Isn't alcohol about removing inhibitions? Can't remember any extrovert toning down because of it...

Similar Threads

  1. Cat/Dog, Introvert/Extrovert
    By heart in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 11-30-2016, 03:14 PM
  2. [INTJ] INTJ's Introverted Feeling - Child (Puer/Puella)
    By Zhash in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 01-04-2010, 09:06 AM
  3. Article on Introverts for Extroverts
    By Natrushka in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 04-16-2009, 05:32 AM
  4. Why are introverts...
    By Mycroft in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 08-27-2007, 08:46 PM
  5. How to Go from Introvert to Extrovert
    By Usehername in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 06-30-2007, 12:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO