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  1. #31
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    The part about Preaching the dominant in indignation is pretty interesting.
    Yeah, interesting. If there's any merit to that, then I'm really an ESFP or ENFP.

    Except.. well.. no. I don't think I make for a good extrovert. Why would I be so attentive to Fi, yet be an EFP, and stink at everything they are seemingly more suited for?

  2. #32
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric B View Post
    I think this is a good point that might throw someone off as to their true dominant as well:

    Attitudes from the Horse's Mouth
    This was an interesting read but it doesn't take into account that while your functions purportedly don't work concurrently (this theory bothers me), different stimuli whether internal or external will cause other functions to come to the forefront.

    But if you look back at your reactions over a defined period of time, you should be able to see patterns in your behaviour.

  3. #33
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    ISTPs and ISFPs often preach "go with the flow, man." They like to preach that since you can't control the world, you've got to just go with what you feel like doing at each moment, without anticipating the future and without bogging yourself down by trying to be consistent with the past. Have fun now, man, tomorrow you could be hit by a bus. Just "be." See Extraverted Sensation.

    You know, there's a difference here with Thomson's book actually. Her descriptions of ISFPs sound like they have a lot of overlap with INFPs (in that their Fi is idealistic). The whole go-with-the-flow thing seems overstated, but I've kind of accepted it..if that's what they are. It's one reason why I decided I was not ISFP though. Sounds like some lazy hippy hedonist faking a Buddha act. How could a Fi type be so much much Se oriented than ESFP?

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    ISTPs and ISFPs often preach "go with the flow, man." They like to preach that since you can't control the world, you've got to just go with what you feel like doing at each moment, without anticipating the future and without bogging yourself down by trying to be consistent with the past. Have fun now, man, tomorrow you could be hit by a bus. Just "be." See Extraverted Sensation.

    You know, there's a difference here with Thomson's book actually. Her descriptions of ISFPs sound like they have a lot of overlap with INFPs (in that their Fi is idealistic). The whole go-with-the-flow thing seems overstated, but I've kind of accepted it..if that's what they are. It's one reason why I decided I was not ISFP though. Sounds like some lazy hippy hedonist faking a Buddha act. How could Fi be so much much Se oriented than ESFP?
    I really relate to that. In a lot of ways Lenore's book pushes me to istp. I mean lazy hippy hedonist on a zen trip is kind of my thing, my ideal. I am what I am. I don't know how it all works. I got estp in my latest cog test.

  5. #35
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Yeah, but Buddha went through hell and back to get there. He didn't just say he was enlightened just because. And then he went and made change in his society. And sometimes chastised his own disciples into correcting themselves too.

    I don't to derail too much about Buddha though I just think just "being" enlightened isn't easily attained for Fi types.. and neither does Thomson. Almost every pop culture example she uses are people who made choices that often put them in conflict with society and the flow of things.

  6. #36

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    Yeah, Zen is a different ball game than Buddhism in popular culture and in the way that enlightenment is achieved. How it is used in her book. The Zen and the art of...quotes etc, I relate to those. Also, she puts a few people on paths to use Se which I think is really Zen.

    You know, I was just thinking, even if Jung came back from the dead and told me I was istp I don't know if I'd change it on the forum. isfp is such a convenient type to be on a forum, neutral ground. You can move any way you want.

  7. #37
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Heh. Suit yourself. *I'm going with the flow here too* I will say though that neutral ground is a 9 thing probably, shared with many types. ISFPs don't necessarily seem neutral imho. Except on this board, I guess. Detailed explanations, like in Thomson's book as I mentioned, aren't close to being limited to that. I think it's uncool if that can't be recognized.

  8. #38

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    I don't mean that I'm neutral. I mean that the isfp archetype is in a neutral position in peoples minds on the forum.

    I feel I am pretty idealistic about some things. I know I can be pretty idealistic about training, training authenticity. The start of the chapter on isfp in that book talks about isfp being deceptively easy going. More often than not an isfp's idealism is driven into something they do. That is how I see it. Idealism itself is abstract in nature, so you'd expect any talk of idealism as a concept in itself to be hard for an isfp to spot. Se obscures it, or maybe changes it is better. The lens is different.

  9. #39
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    I mean that the isfp archetype is in a neutral position in peoples minds on the forum.
    Yeah, I know.. I don't think it makes a lot of sense though. That wiki site is cool too, but I just thought it was funny to catch that description there. Texts like Thomson's would disagree that they're freeflowing.. She's one of the authors that gives them the credit of making impact with their ideas and being discriminate, rather than this need to just be. Views like that strip people of any recognizable aspirations. Even by Keirsey's more limited descriptions, they would be artists/composers - and artists don't have a lack of things to say either. They have something they're not flowing with - whether personal or a larger issue. Maybe 10% of artists don't say anything worth a damn, but those are bands like.. Bananarama and Nickelback or something. And I wouldn't call Nickelback ISFP

  10. #40

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    I think the thing is you don't get a lot of isfp really invested in typology. That is why. If an isfp was really into typology, I mean, that was really his thing. Then you would see all that come out.

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