User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 31

  1. #21
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6
    Posts
    1,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    for those of us who aren't Te masters, it's a good place to start - even if it sounds boring.

    but if you're a non-Te dom/aux completely uninterested in outputting logically while not under pressure, then are you really going to be able to adhere to primarily Te only and output logically when under fire? i totally agree with what you're saying, but easier said than done when it's not something you've honed over the years. if someone told me to hop up to the plate and use some Ti under fire i'd die of laughter. i'd end up using Fi and i know it. my level of Ti blows way too much to even consider that yet.

    external categorization and organization systems are Te, even if you find them boring. writing does happen to be an action, even if it's not cinema-worthy. if that's not someone's personal choice on how to work on improving Te, that's fine, but it's no reason to write it off (write, ha ha), either.
    I'm sorry, but what you are describing isn't Te. While it is true that organising your thoughts can be useful before making a decision, that's not an extroverted function opperating. The attitude is introverted. Specifically, it's a rather introverted sensing approach, making sure that you know everything that is going on before you make a decision.

    Te is more than just making a decision, it is the urge to act upon it. It is in that action that Te develops. No extroverted function can be developed by sitting around thinking about stuff. They are doing functions, so to exercise them you have to go out there and do stuff.
    Don't make whine out of sour grapes.

  2. #22
    i love skylights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 so/sx
    Socionics
    EII Ne
    Posts
    7,835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    I'm sorry, but what you are describing isn't Te. While it is true that organising your thoughts can be useful before making a decision, that's not an extroverted function opperating. The attitude is introverted. Specifically, it's a rather introverted sensing approach, making sure that you know everything that is going on before you make a decision.

    Te is more than just making a decision, it is the urge to act upon it. It is in that action that Te develops. No extroverted function can be developed by sitting around thinking about stuff. They are doing functions, so to exercise them you have to go out there and do stuff.
    i get what you're saying, but i still think that there's a huge difference between thinking internally and arranging things externally. when you write something down, it becomes available to externally manipulate. and that external manipulation, based upon logical principles is - at least as i understood it - Te.

    maybe i'm totally off here, but that's how i always understood Te working for me. it isn't at all about sitting around and organizing things in your head. it's about acting outside of your head. though perhaps it's precisely because i have my internal judging function before Te that the natural progression of things for me is to start with Fi and use Te to output Fi and then re-order it logically. perhaps this is why some Fi-dom/auxs seem to find Te so boring (or so captivating, either).

    hm, it would be better to work on Te without resorting to using one's internal judging process at all.

    and of course perhaps i am just completely off.

    i should limit myself to discussion of Ne x___x;

  3. #23
    Filthy Apes! Kalach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    4,318

    Default

    Te is, in one nutshell, making evaluations of statements according to whether or not they match the external world. Te inference is, in a similar nutshell, movement from one statement to another according to whether or not "that's what happens in the external world".

    (Ti users, panties, bunch. Yes, Ti matches to the world, but "matches the world" is not the primary determinant of truth and validity.)
    Bellison uncorked a flood of horrible profanity, which, translated, meant, "This is extremely unusual."

    Boy meets Grr

  4. #24
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6
    Posts
    1,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    i get what you're saying, but i still think that there's a huge difference between thinking internally and arranging things externally. when you write something down, it becomes available to externally manipulate. and that external manipulation, based upon logical principles is - at least as i understood it - Te.

    maybe i'm totally off here, but that's how i always understood Te working for me. it isn't at all about sitting around and organizing things in your head. it's about acting outside of your head. though perhaps it's precisely because i have my internal judging function before Te that the natural progression of things for me is to start with Fi and use Te to output Fi and then re-order it logically. perhaps this is why some Fi-dom/auxs seem to find Te so boring (or so captivating, either).

    hm, it would be better to work on Te without resorting to using one's internal judging process at all.

    and of course perhaps i am just completely off.

    i should limit myself to discussion of Ne x___x;
    Whether you right something down or keep it in your head makes little to the functions. They aren't about what you do so much as why you do it. Stephen Hawking does complex calculations in his head, but before his illness became to severe I bet he wrote them down instead. That doesn't change his motivation for doing them. It didn't go from Te to Ti.

    I'm sorry if I sound like I was being overly harsh, but for certain types, mistaking Si for Te can be a bad idea. An INFP attempting to exercise their Te, but instead using Si ends up fueling the tertiary temptation, rather than developing the inferior. This is liable to make things worse, rather than better. They hesitate as much as before, they just have a new excuse for doing so.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalach View Post
    Te is, in one nutshell, making evaluations of statements according to whether or not they match the external world. Te inference is, in a similar nutshell, movement from one statement to another according to whether or not "that's what happens in the external world".

    (Ti users, panties, bunch. Yes, Ti matches to the world, but "matches the world" is not the primary determinant of truth and validity.)
    I think Te concernsit's self less with "what happens in the external world" (that's more the job of a percieving function) so much as "what is needed in the external world". Then, once it has decided what is needed, it goes off and does something about it.
    Don't make whine out of sour grapes.

  5. #25
    Filthy Apes! Kalach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    4,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    I think Te concernsit's self less with "what happens in the external world" (that's more the job of a percieving function) so much as "what is needed in the external world". Then, once it has decided what is needed, it goes off and does something about it.
    I don't mean Te perceives, I mean rather that it measures. For Te as a judgment function, what determines assignment of "true" or "false" is, ultimately, "Does the external world support this?" That's the measure. It's not very likely to be the conscious question asked of oneself when one is doing the act of Te conclusion-making, but that's how it gets done. So claiming as part of Te the "does something about [what is needed]" follow up is tricky.

    One could, by virtue of paying "logical" attention to the external world, conclude that something is missing or there is something to be done. But actually directly doing that something is something else. There's a combination of imperatives from other functions that will channel what action decision is made. Like, for INTJ, there's always the interest in cogitating more since introversion is preferred, so that influences your choice. And Se is weakly part of the person, so actually wanting to get physically involved in rectifying the situation is iffy. And one may actually not even care, or may care in a way that negates immediate action. Thus, I would prefer to say Te is all about the concluding. It's just the logic part of the decision. If there is a follow up decision to do something, that's quite possibly also a Te conclusion, but as a result of various particulars of the person and the situation rather than a feature of Te itself.

    On the other hand, how does one say an extroverted judgment function is closure oriented if one does not say that it prompts people to fix or change what they identify as misplaced?

    But what if it's feeling that drives closure-seeking behaviour? "Thinking" by itself is supposed to be impersonal and detached. What creates attachment and desire to fix?
    Bellison uncorked a flood of horrible profanity, which, translated, meant, "This is extremely unusual."

    Boy meets Grr

  6. #26
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6
    Posts
    1,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalach View Post
    And one may actually not even care, or may care in a way that negates immediate action.
    You are describing the tertiary temptation for ITJs, where Fi creates an excuse to maintain the introverted stance and not do anything.
    Don't make whine out of sour grapes.

  7. #27
    Senior Member animenagai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    NeFi
    Enneagram
    4w3
    Posts
    1,573

    Default

    I do these Ne exercises from time to time, used to do them heaps as a kid:

    1. Do some 'mental free-writing'. What I like to do is think of a mental image then quickly morph that image into something else, then morph it into something else, and something else yet again. Don't be afraid of how silly your ideas may be, that's the point, to help you make (creative) links faster, without thoughts like "that's too weird" or "that will never be practical" getting in the way.

    2. I do this when I'm bored on the bus sometimes, as you stare out the window, imagine a cartoon character trying to keep up with you, hopping over cars, trees, whatever. I think it helps putting you in a creative frame of mind.

    Those are mostly for the creativity aspect of Ne, if you want something a bit more logical maybe you can try

    3. doing some abstract analysis or drawing some abstract conclusions about things. For example, if you like fashion you can ask questions like 'what are the key components to looking aesthetically pleasing'; or if you like sports say you can ask 'what are the key skills that gets a player open'. Something like that, it's kinda hard to explain.

  8. #28
    Senior Member InTheFlesh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Enneagram
    CFV
    Posts
    276

    Default

    Someone has to know what can be done for Ti!
    Come on, let it out

  9. #29
    meh Salomé's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    10,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    There is an excellent book called Functions of Type, Activities to Develop The Eight Jungian Functions by Gary and Margaret Hartzler that is about this topic. EdCoaching recommended it.
    It's more of a pamphlet.
    Quote Originally Posted by InTheFlesh View Post
    Someone has to know what can be done for Ti!
    Come on, let it out
    • Organize data into logical categories
    • Use an internal framework
    • Seek data to fill out taxonomies (ooh )
    • Understand the underlying model of how things work
    • Revise models or categories
    • Search for precision
    • Prioritize categories
    • Logically relate categories to each other
    • Use priorities to make decisions
    • Look for consistency in your life
    • Educate others about your models and categories


    Damn. So sexy! lol
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  10. #30
    ReflecTcelfeR
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Morgan Le Fay View Post
    It's more of a pamphlet.


    • Organize data into logical categories
    • Use an internal framework
    • Seek data to fill out taxonomies (ooh )
    • Understand the underlying model of how things work
    • Revise models or categories
    • Search for precision
    • Prioritize categories
    • Logically relate categories to each other
    • Use priorities to make decisions
    • Look for consistency in your life
    • Educate others about your models and categories


    Damn. So sexy! lol
    Mind numbingly delicious!

Similar Threads

  1. How to strengthen core functions/ Avoid shadow functions
    By IndyGhost in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-04-2013, 02:00 PM
  2. Popular Misconceptions About Certain Functions
    By Title in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-22-2013, 12:21 AM
  3. Replies: 37
    Last Post: 08-05-2007, 04:24 PM
  4. Confusing Functions.
    By Athenian200 in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 07-02-2007, 02:57 PM
  5. How has developing your secondary function changed you?
    By SolitaryWalker in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 05-27-2007, 10:44 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO