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  1. #11
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    I hate things like the Trolley Problem. To me they seem overly manipulative and unrealistic. I'm not saying the research isn't interesting and legitimate, I'm just indicating how I, as a Feeling type, react to such things. They're just games. On the other hand, I find peoples' real emotions and motivations and behavior endlessly compelling -- some people might call this "gossip," but definitely not me! All the petty details of the recent breakup of a friend's marriage -- I can talk about them over and over again, long past the point my Thinking comrades lose interest. If there's no one to "gossip" with, I am endlessly entertained working these issues out in my own mind. This is not mere titillation for me, or even being judgmental, this is just how my mind works. I am weighing all the (human) evidence and trying to better understand how the world (of people) works.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    (ganked from amplify.com)

    Time to Use your Jungian Feeling!

    The Trolley Problem
    Totally getting off-subject here, but people tend toward a mindset of inaction in situations like this. They'd rather not act than have their actions cause harm.


    As for the subject itself.. yeah, all of the terms are misunderstood at first because the terms are conflated with their colloquial meanings. Feeling is probably the primary culprit, though.

    I guess the chosen words (Thinking, Feeling, Sensing, Intuition, ...) represent the closest analogs to their intended meanings. It'd be nice if there were.. better words.

  3. #13
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    Totally getting off-subject here, but people tend toward a mindset of inaction in situations like this. They'd rather not act than have their actions cause harm.
    That's the issue with the trolley problem.

    Also, people will tend to go by numbers if they have to do something as simple as flip a switch -- "Save one stranger or save five strangers? Okay, I'll save five."

    But they have a lot harder time choosing to kill one if they have to kill him themselves, directly, to spare five. Chances are they just won't act if they would have to kill someone directly (rather than just diverting a train by flipping a switch), and the five would die by default.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #14
    Senior Member Robopop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    Jung stated it in no uncertain terms. So has pretty much every Jungian analyst on the planet. But in this forum, people would rather sling rotten typology tomatoes at each other, than read a book and learn for themselves. The Feeling function as a mental process is not to be confused with physiological emotions. The Feeling function evaluates worth. That means one who prefers Thinking as a judging process can be equal to, or even more emotional than, someone who prefers to make decisions with the Feeling function. This infomation is readily available in many books.
    Someone with dom or aux thinking function CAN be more emotionally reactive than someone with dom or aux feeling, really this is more related to the emotional stability dimension than thinking or feeling cognitive functions.
    Reserved Calm Unstructured Egocentric Inquisitive Clown

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  5. #15
    As Long As It Takes.... Redbone's Avatar
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    That's the exact word I use when I describe the Feeling function - evaluative.
    This is something I have recently come to understand myself. After talking a long time to a friend (he is ESFJ), I realized that he is evaluating things in his mind. I can almost see him putting it on a scale (like Ma'at). It made me appreciate that his way of decision making is not flawed but different (yes--I was prejudiced) and it's all good.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    Totally getting off-subject here, but people tend toward a mindset of inaction in situations like this. They'd rather not act than have their actions cause harm.
    Yeah, that's what I meant by the "anxiety" that thinking about this sort of thing causes... I don't think people could stand the pressure that well.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    It made me appreciate that his way of decision making is not flawed but different (yes--I was prejudiced) and it's all good.
    I'm catching on...

    Isn't this itself an evaluative statement?

  8. #18
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    This is something I have recently come to understand myself. After talking a long time to a friend (he is ESFJ), I realized that he is evaluating things in his mind. I can almost see him putting it on a scale (like Ma'at). It made me appreciate that his way of decision making is not flawed but different (yes--I was prejudiced) and it's all good.
    I think that's one of the greatest posts I have ever seen in this forum.
    Now, all we have to do is get a couple hundred more to realize what you have.

  9. #19
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    Yay!

  10. #20
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    Totally getting off-subject here, but people tend toward a mindset of inaction in situations like this. They'd rather not act than have their actions cause harm.
    yes, absolutely - especially given that, in the problem, there is no actual guarantee that the 5 people will die if you do not act, whereas there is certainty that the 1 person will die of you do.

    it's interesting to hear the ethics decisions rely upon, too. stuff like utilitarianism and kantian philosophy... stuff that sounds kind of logical on the outside but rests on conceptions that are irrational in nature.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lily Bart View Post
    I hate things like the Trolley Problem. To me they seem overly manipulative and unrealistic. I'm not saying the research isn't interesting and legitimate, I'm just indicating how I, as a Feeling type, react to such things. They're just games.
    the point is to put you in a place where a purely logical decision is almost completely inaccessible, so it almost has to be contrived. its goal is to put you in a situation that almost never occurs in real life.

    incidentally, i'm a Feeling type too, and am quite interested in people's answers to these hypothetical situations because, game or not, they have real-world implications. maybe people will get pissed at me for talking Fi/Fe but it would make sense for us, for our opinions on this. it matters more to me because it's personal values (Fi) and not as much interpersonal relations (Fe).

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    This is something I have recently come to understand myself. After talking a long time to a friend (he is ESFJ), I realized that he is evaluating things in his mind. I can almost see him putting it on a scale (like Ma'at). It made me appreciate that his way of decision making is not flawed but different (yes--I was prejudiced) and it's all good.
    nice explanation, and sweet. i'm coming to appreciate both T and F decision making styles more, and to understand T decisions better.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    I think that's one of the greatest posts I have ever seen in this forum.
    Now, all we have to do is get a couple hundred more to realize what you have.
    yup. and for a couple hundred Feelers to admit that being a T doesn't make someone an uncaring asshole, lol

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