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  1. #1
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    Default Jung's definitions of I and E

    So I'm reading some work by Carl Jung. The book is titled Psychological Types. I just got started into it, but he begins with the orienation of the functions (I and E). His explanation of an extrovert is defined as the thinking of how the object relates to you and the intraverted as relating an object to yourself. By this definition being an extrovert and intravert is ultimately dependant on how much you value the object. I know we have tendencies towards one side than the other, I suppose it just makes me doubt whether I am an 'I' or an 'E'. I suppose it isn't that bad of a situation, I was just wanting to hear some other opinions about Jung's definitions. Any insight is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    how the object relates to you and the intraverted as relating an object to yourself.
    i'm sorry but what's the difference?
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  3. #3
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    I may have written that wrong! Lemme check. Extraverted is explained as (I should've just did this in the first place) the object having more value than the person, and Introversion as the person having more value than the object. Sorry 'bout that.

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    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    hmmm....can the object be a person? what's an example?
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  5. #5
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    hmmm....can the object be a person? what's an example?
    A person falls under the category of object.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Chloe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    i'm sorry but what's the difference?
    Fe: looks at the book shelf and thinks "how will this book fit onto this book shelf"

    Fi: looks at the book shelf and thinks "where is the perfect place to put my book in this shelf?"

    the same for I vs. E. in this example : you= book, shelf = object

  7. #7
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    hmmm....can the object be a person? what's an example?
    I thought about that as well. I suppose so, I mean technically we are objects in some contexts. Examples... I'll use one from the book! He mentions two people from near the beginning of recorded history, Tertullian and Origen. Both of these men were extremely dedicated to the church, however they showed this in extreme ways. Tertullian was gung ho about Christianity, but as the concept of Christianity changed he began to withdraw and stick with his own personal idea. Jung tells us that this is an example of an extreme introvert and explains that "...Through the 'sacrificium intellectus' [The Sacrifice of the Intellect] the way of purely intellectual development was closed to him; it forced him to recognize the irrational dynamism of his soul as the foundation of his being..." He cut himself from the very thing that he lived for in order to obtains his own ideals, which makes him more important than the object (his religion). Accordingly Origen embraced the church in every way possible and castrated himself so that he would not be distracted (sexually) to his work. He did all this in order to embrace Christianity even more, thus making the object have greater value making him an Extravert.

    That was long-winded. Did this make sense? I haven't explained this to anyone yet so it's pretty choppy I imagine.

  8. #8
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    hmm...it makes some sense...but like what chloe said how does that work for an extraverted fi person.
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  9. #9
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    Hmmmm, to be honest I don't know, I haven't gotten that far into the book yet, but if you're up to it we can try to sort it out and see if we are right?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Chloe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    hmm...it makes some sense...but like what chloe said how does that work for an extraverted fi person.
    extraverted Fi person leads with Se or Ne... but I only tried to explain that it's how you define yourself: you define yourself by outside world (e) or outside world by yourself (i).

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