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  1. #11
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    Well, I'm new to MBTI (though I studied it a little in college 20 years ago) so my assesments may not be entirely accurate. Surprisingly I think that my mother and I are both ISFPs. Which of course isn't to say that we are exactly the same. She is more extremely I, while I have highter N and T than she does. In terms of P, we might be about the same. Frankly, I'm much more book-smart than she was but that may have something to do with expectation of females born in the 1940's versus 1960's.

    My daughter and youngest son are ENFP and INFP (I think, though daughter has strong S), so that's fairly close. My other son is ESFP which is similar to myself and my mom.

  2. #12
    Dhampyr Economica's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrisbeeLad View Post
    Wow!!! So...how do they get along? Major roller-coaster with highs of complete-understanding and lows of "familiarity breeds contempt"?
    Note the italics; they're the same type not only as each other but also as me. Yup, that's three INTJs in one family.

    In my experience with other INTJs the roller-coaster dynamic you describe was and is always in effect but only on a small scale. (There's low variance in the everyday interaction as opposed to periods of strong bonding followed by periods of irritable avoidance.) The drama lies in whether the relation exists at all, and when/once the individuals are adults, being family is no guarantee in that respect.

    My brother and I have been close since my mid-teens. (He's six years my senior.) As for our mother... I refer you to posts #41 and #50 in this thread.

    Whenever I interact with other ISTP's it's an odd dynamic. We almost innately know where the other is coming from in our discussions but at the same time can read each other so well and quickly that it seems kinda contemptuous (almost like we're bored of the other's presense).
    I agree; on one level same-type interaction is very easy because you understand each other so well, but it does get old: When I'm with INTJ friends, once we've analyzed everything that's accumulated for analysis since we last met, we run out of things to talk about. Also, flaws one recognizes from the mirror are doubly unattractive in others. :steam:

    Normally, however, I experience these same-type dynamic downsides as luxury problems. Despite my signature, I wouldn't forgo knowing (and always having known) other INTJs for anything.

  3. #13
    Member FrisbeeLad's Avatar
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    Whoa!!! Three of you. That's amazing!!! I think I need to revise my belief that same sibling and parent types, in Western families, ARE possible but (to me) now are just either a) rare or b) extremely rare. That must've been a trip growing up in that setting. I completely agree about the mirror in which flaws are doubly unattractive in same types. The mirror becomes more of a magnifying glass; hopefully not focused too long and intense like we used to do as kids burning dried leaves or even insects with sunlight.

    Reading your previous posts that you referred me too was sort of eerie because my British INTJ friend talks and writes VERY VERY similarly. That could've been him simply talking to me. Weird and cool at the same time!! He also likes Ayn Rand. Lately he's taken a serious liking to the Austrian school of economics and libertarianism. Some of his ideas though seem TOO idealistic for me about "the market sorting everything out"; more so when it comes to public trust commodities like water. I can see it working for other things. However, I asked a libertarian Web site if they could name a single country that was a libertarian state and they said Somalia. That was it and that country doesn't seem like it's working too well or effectively. Of course, I do know that Western countries are f***ing with that experiment so it may not ever work. I just like to see that ideal somewhere and somehow working in a practical (Sensor) manner. Anyway...we rambling again. Sorry.

  4. #14
    Scream down the boulevard LadyJaye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by arcticangel02 View Post
    As far as the twin thing, strangely enough that does seem to be the case. No idea why that might be, though.

    Here on MBTICentral we've got twins PinkPiranha (ENFJ) and LadyJaye (ENFP). They're identical, I believe. And Aelan (ENTP) has an INTP twin sister, too.

    We are, in fact, identical. Good memory, darling! And I believe Aelan's an identical twin as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by FrisbeeLad View Post
    Cool!!! That supports that idea about twins, type, and genetics.
    We just recently had a set of identical twin women for a visit last week, and they are, I believe, an INTP and an INFP. ( and we barely averted a rip in space time from all the twinsy energy - I can't imagine what sort of chaos ensues when there are twin conventions. )

  5. #15
    Scream down the boulevard LadyJaye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Economica View Post
    Note the italics; they're the same type not only as each other but also as me. Yup, that's three INTJs in one family.

    In my experience with other INTJs the roller-coaster dynamic you describe was and is always in effect but only on a small scale. (There's low variance in the everyday interaction as opposed to periods of strong bonding followed by periods of irritable avoidance.) The drama lies in whether the relation exists at all, and when/once the individuals are adults, being family is no guarantee in that respect.

    My brother and I have been close since my mid-teens. (He's six years my senior.) As for our mother... I refer you to posts #41 and #50 in this thread.



    I agree; on one level same-type interaction is very easy because you understand each other so well, but it does get old: When I'm with INTJ friends, once we've analyzed everything that's accumulated for analysis since we last met, we run out of things to talk about. Also, flaws one recognizes from the mirror are doubly unattractive in others. :steam:

    Normally, however, I experience these same-type dynamic downsides as luxury problems. Despite my signature, I wouldn't forgo knowing (and always having known) other INTJs for anything.

    This is fascinating. I couldn't imagine having three INTJ's in a room, period, much less related to each other. The analytical energy must be razor sharp.

  6. #16
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    I've always thought that kids tended to be the opposite type from their parents because kids like to rebel against their parents. I have heard of a lot of INTP's with xSFJ mothers.

  7. #17
    To the top of the world arcticangel02's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by athenian200 View Post
    I've always thought that kids tended to be the opposite type from their parents because kids like to rebel against their parents. I have heard of a lot of INTP's with xSFJ mothers.
    I doubt that is actually the case - you probably just hear about the ones with totally opposite parents moreso because it's often a problematic relationship?

    And taking Economica's anecdote, you can easily have a bad relationship with an identical-type, too.

    Take my family, for example:
    Dad: ESTJ
    Mum: ISFP
    Kids: ENFP
    ESFP
    INFP

    Between parents and children, there's one opposite there (ESTJ/INFP), but there's one very similar (ISFP/ESFP), too. And while I am different enough from both parents, I'm equally similar to both my siblings (ENFP/ESFP) and (ENFP/INFP).

    In this case, everyone gets along well enough, but just using that as a case study, (lol) there's similarities and opposites and everything in between, too. In a family of four people or more, it's likely there are going to be some significant differences between types.

    Um, yeah. I have no idea what I set out to say.

    Perhaps just to say that there is nothing really to be said?
    ANFP:
    Extraversion (52%) ---- Introversion (48%)
    Sensing (26%) ---- iNtuition (74%)
    Thinking (16%) ---- Feeling (84%)
    Judging (5%) ---- Perceiving (95%)

    9w1 so/sx/sp

  8. #18
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrisbeeLad View Post
    First, I'm new here. Searched for this topic. Didn't find anything and thus, the new thread. Apologies up-front if this thread already exists.

    So...I'd say I've been type-watching and learning about MBTI for about 10 years or so and there's two things I've never seen.

    1) A child and parent of the same MBTI type
    2) Two siblings of the same type

    It must be possible as you couldn't avoid it in a family of 15/16+, but how often does that really occur in the world today?

    Has any one out there that's fairly experienced with MBTI ever seen either phenomena?

    Thanks!
    Is the mutation the mechanism of the end?

    Or the mechanism at the outset?

  9. #19
    Senior Member developer's Avatar
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    Long ago, I used to be very good friends with two ladies who were identical twins. They spent lots of time together and hung out with the same crowd, and people usually could not tell them apart. Still, one was ISTJ, the other INFP. The ISTJ was the administrator of an archive, the INFP a psychologist (sounds like a clich

  10. #20
    Senior Member developer's Avatar
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    Grr, part of post got eaten.

    I was saying: sunds like a cliche, but is true.

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