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  1. #71
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    People with autism and Aspbergers are a varied lot, but there is a generalization they tend to be quite literal in their thinking and interpretation of language. I think there can be problems trying to align it with MBTI. I work with a rather extroverted person with Aspbergers, and being socially abrasive or unaware doesn't automatically make someone desire to be alone. The syndrome is especially traumatic for people who get their energy from the company of others and they may tend to use negative energy if their social perceptions keep them from having peaceful interactions.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
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  2. #72
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unicorn010 View Post
    I avoid people that think if certain personalities don't all develop at the same pace they have something like that, why not let people live normal fucking lives.

    ENTJ
    My son's diagnosis is meant to help him live a normal life. We had a choice of eschewing labels because labels are bad (which many people seem to think but can't quite articulate why), or accepting a label that would help people who encounter him in a school setting understand why he does things a bit differently from other kids instead of putting their own labels on him (lazy, disobedient, bratty, etc). It also means that we are able to ask for accommodations for him in school, and once those accommodations are codified his teachers are legally bound to follow them. He's able to get extra help for things that don't come naturally to him- auditory processing is VERY weak area for him, so his teacher has to provide him with visual aids and use a visual schedule to help him anticipate what comes next in the school day.

    When you say "if certain personalities don't all develop at the same pace they have something like that" you're making a value judgment that "something like that" (autism) is a terrible, awful thing, akin to a death sentence, and must be avoided at all costs. That's just not so. It's simply an alternative brain wiring that causes individuals to think in sometimes radically different ways. I'm a big fan of neurodiversity and accepting differences among people- but that's doesn't mean I can't also be in favor of acknowledging developmental differences. A diagnosis means legal protection and accommodations in school. I'm all for anything that will ease the school experience for a kid who is different from the other kids.
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  3. #73
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I have basically the same rationale as Ivy for allowing a label to be placed on my sons. They were obviously not low intelligence, but acted very differently than their peers in social/communication areas. A label was inevitable -- if I hadn't pursued an official label that got them some accommodations, they would have gotten the unofficial labels similar to what Ivy has mentioned -- lazy, stupid, immature. Rather than having that happen, I gave the school what they wanted (a label) so I could get what my boys needed. Now my older boy is in advanced math and reading in seventh grade and doing pretty well over all. He gets some coaching from the speech therapist, is allowed to leave his books in his classrooms, and has an obsolete laptop for writing assignments because he has some motor skill delays. They are also a little slower to give him detention if he's acting like a freak (he's an extrovert and thinks he's hilarious) than they otherwise would. I'm not sure if that part is good or not, but I'm not going to fuss about it.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  4. #74
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    My son's diagnosis is meant to help him live a normal life. We had a choice of eschewing labels because labels are bad (which many people seem to think but can't quite articulate why), or accepting a label that would help people who encounter him in a school setting understand why he does things a bit differently from other kids instead of putting their own labels on him (lazy, disobedient, bratty, etc). It also means that we are able to ask for accommodations for him in school, and once those accommodations are codified his teachers are legally bound to follow them. He's able to get extra help for things that don't come naturally to him- auditory processing is VERY weak area for him, so his teacher has to provide him with visual aids and use a visual schedule to help him anticipate what comes next in the school day.

    When you say "if certain personalities don't all develop at the same pace they have something like that" you're making a value judgment that "something like that" (autism) is a terrible, awful thing, akin to a death sentence, and must be avoided at all costs. That's just not so. It's simply an alternative brain wiring that causes individuals to think in sometimes radically different ways. I'm a big fan of neurodiversity and accepting differences among people- but that's doesn't mean I can't also be in favor of acknowledging developmental differences. A diagnosis means legal protection and accommodations in school. I'm all for anything that will ease the school experience for a kid who is different from the other kids.

    Ivy, I agreed with unicorn's comment. That means everything you just wrote to unicorn could have been written to me. Why I agreed didn't even have anything to do with Asperger's, whatsoever. I agreed because of the incessant, reckless, labeling of people in general, and exacerbated by MBTI. I want to make that perfectly clear.

  5. #75
    Member Srho's Avatar
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    The people I know with Aspergers are the following types: INTP, ISTP, ISFP, and ENFP. Confirmed. I thought it would be simpler, since it seems such a J thing.

  6. #76
    hypersane Hive's Avatar
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    Considering some traits related to the diagnose like need for routine, trouble relating to other people's feelings and lack of imagination, my qualified guess is that ISTJ, ISTP and INTP are the most common types amongst the aspies.

  7. #77
    Reptilian Snuggletron's Avatar
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    assburger in paradise.

  8. #78
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    I found this place by Google, and just felt like sharing that I have tested as an ISFP on the MBTI, and long before that I was diagnosed with Asperger's. That is all.

  9. #79
    Certified Sausage Smoker Elfboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    My son's diagnosis is meant to help him live a normal life. We had a choice of eschewing labels because labels are bad (which many people seem to think but can't quite articulate why), or accepting a label that would help people who encounter him in a school setting understand why he does things a bit differently from other kids instead of putting their own labels on him (lazy, disobedient, bratty, etc). It also means that we are able to ask for accommodations for him in school, and once those accommodations are codified his teachers are legally bound to follow them. He's able to get extra help for things that don't come naturally to him- auditory processing is VERY weak area for him, so his teacher has to provide him with visual aids and use a visual schedule to help him anticipate what comes next in the school day.

    When you say "if certain personalities don't all develop at the same pace they have something like that" you're making a value judgment that "something like that" (autism) is a terrible, awful thing, akin to a death sentence, and must be avoided at all costs. That's just not so. It's simply an alternative brain wiring that causes individuals to think in sometimes radically different ways. I'm a big fan of neurodiversity and accepting differences among people- but that's doesn't mean I can't also be in favor of acknowledging developmental differences. A diagnosis means legal protection and accommodations in school. I'm all for anything that will ease the school experience for a kid who is different from the other kids.
    I think labels are wonderfully usefully if used properly. today's society puts a political taboo on them, but I think this is incredibly stupid. not everyone is born the same and these differences affect the way we do things. that's one of the things I like about MBTI. it allows you to do MORE with your life, not less. it's just than an ESFJ and an INTJ are not going to do things the same way. an ESFJ might learn better in a larger group with an instructor more similar to traditional schooling, while an INTJ might be confused by this and need to study things on his own (my INTJ friend is a genius mentally, but he has to study everything before he does it. for instance, his dad made him fix a pipeline one time, and he had to spend a day studying the anatomy of the plumbing system and various factors that would affect the water flow/drain build up before he could do so much as fix a single pipe)
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  10. #80
    Certified Sausage Smoker Elfboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unsung View Post
    Considering some traits related to the diagnose like need for routine, trouble relating to other people's feelings and lack of imagination, my qualified guess is that ISTJ, ISTP and INTP are the most common types amongst the aspies.
    I would think INTJ even moreso. INTJs tend to get obsessed with things and are notorious for being "little professors" just like people with asperger's syndrome.
    ENFP: We put the Fi in Fire
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    Male Archtype: King/Lover
    Sunburst!
    "You are a gay version of Gambit" Speed Gavroche
    "I wish that I could be affected by any hate, but I can't, cuz I just get affected by the bank" Chamillionaire
    Likes chubber liked this post

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