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  1. #11
    Yeah, I can fly. Aleksei's Avatar
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    Way I see it N focuses on what could be. S focuses on what is.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member guesswho's Avatar
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    I can add a few things from my own observations.

    Sensing is attention-memory noticing the details from the present, to create a bigger picture. Sensors are very focused on 'looks', details that others do not see, they notice them.

    Another thing I noticed is that when a 'sensor' goes in a bar...he is very picky on how it looks, who is there, how much smoke is in there, how loud is the music. He really SENSES A LOT.

    I am very intuitive, I really don't give a crap where I go as long as I can have fun and talk about something interesting. I won't sense the smoke/heat/noise..everything in there. Because my mind is not focused there. I won't even remember much about the bar, the sensor will easily tell you a lot about what's in there.

    The more intuition you have/use, the more messier you are, you lose track of stuff.

    'Intuitives' opposed to the 'sensors' don't have such a great attention/memory, mine really sucks. But I understand way much faster. I remember only the essence of the details from which I form the big picture. The 'sensor' will memorize a lot of stuff in order to form the big picture, because he must see ALL THE DOTS, it's hard for him to understand without all the facts and everything. Most of the time, intuitive people don't need all the dots, because in their mind, they see the rest.

  3. #13
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guesswho View Post
    'Intuitives' opposed to the 'sensors' don't have such a great attention/memory, mine really sucks.
    haha, yup, my memory blows too. not for "atmospheres", or general feelings, i remember those great. but concrete detail is a no-go.

    i like the way you worded it, i really think there's a sacrifice of parts for whole, or whole for parts. the holy grail, of course, would be to have both. i wonder, if someone with a strong N or S trains their opposite function extensively, can they have both functions without seriously sacrificing the other? can you train yourself to use both strongly at once?

  4. #14
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    Somewhere I read that N types see the forest but miss the trees, and S types see the trees but miss the forest.

    I haven't quite been able to put my finger on the difference. But it seems like I know which are which when I talk to them. S types seems to focus on the here and now, what they ate, what they saw, who they talked to and what was said, their aches and pains. N types seem to talk more about things beyond the here and now. At least, it seems like the people I know have typed out that way.

  5. #15
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    haha, yup, my memory blows too. not for "atmospheres", or general feelings, i remember those great. but concrete detail is a no-go.

    i like the way you worded it, i really think there's a sacrifice of parts for whole, or whole for parts. the holy grail, of course, would be to have both. i wonder, if someone with a strong N or S trains their opposite function extensively, can they have both functions without seriously sacrificing the other? can you train yourself to use both strongly at once?
    i got pretty good Si and its not away from my Ne at all. It doesent make me see details, but my memory is very detailed, sometimes i can even remember details on something that has happened even tho i didnt notice them when they did happen. Also if i have been somewhere, i can remember how to get there for years, even tho i have been there once and i can remember exactly what people said moments ago, even tho i wasnt paying attention to the details when they said it. But the most awesome thing about this is that i can remember every little detail(every pitch on guitar, or where drummer hits the cymbals and on what beat etc) highly complex songs. Im not sure if this has something to Si working with Ne, but im really good at predicting notes on music, especially(but not limited to) if i know the artists style of playing the music, kinda like if he played this and this note, he should play this the next(and i do it at the same speed that he is playing) and here there should be a pause and the pause should end now etc
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
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