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  1. #11
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alcearos View Post
    This thread made me think if I could type people by identifying their extraverted function.

    So, when trying to type introverted people, I should try to identify their secondary function first instead of dominant function because their secondary function is extraverted function which is visible for people.

    If typing with extroverted function would be possible, then I could group MBTI types according to their first extraverted function. The groups would then be:

    Extraverted Sensation, Se: SP's
    Extraverted Intuition, Ne: NP's
    Extraverted Thinking, Te: TJ's
    Extraverted Feeling, Fe: FJ's

    The question here is that does dominant and secondary extraverted function resemble each other, e.g does Se look the same when it's dominant or secondary function?

    If this way of typing people would be sensible, then I could do typing as follows:

    1) indentify: I or E
    2) first extravert function: Se, Ne, Te or Fe
    3) first introvert function: Si, Ni, Ti or Fi.

    What do you thnk of this way of identifying MBTI types?
    It looks like a good idea... but the problem is that even Extraverted functions can manifest differently in different people. That's the largest problem, in fact. But if you can see patterns that change less that personal idiosyncrasies, and learn to trust those, you'll get better at typing people. Sometimes it can also help to look at what they mistrust, why they mistrust it, and what they believe is best. I usually rely on "inverse" typing... I try to initially type a person based on what they despise/revile first, assuming this is probably the weakest function. Using a combination of methods combined with hunches is probably best.

  2. #12
    Aspie Idealist TaylorS's Avatar
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    I use that method a lot. For example, my mother:

    1. She is fairly introverted and has told me that she is an introvert. I

    2. She is very big on empathy and knowing and understanding the wants, needs, and expectations of others and is big on people adhering to appropriate social behavior. Likes soap operas. Auxiliary Fe

    3. She bases her behavior on experience and by what she was taught. Dominant Si

    4. In the last few years she has become interested in forensics shows like CSI and has become interested in the analytical, logical aspects of the field. Tertiary Ti


    Therefore, she is most likely an ISFJ.
    Autistic INFP


  3. #13
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TaylorS View Post
    ... [/B]Therefore, she is most likely an ISFJ.
    Did you notice any deficiencies in Ne along the way as well? (Usually a weak Ne becomes apparent in stress situations.)
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #14
    Senior Member Gabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wandering View Post
    Sounds extremely sensible to me

    Here are a few "problems" I can see that you need to be aware of, though:

    1- The one Jennifer mentioned: sometimes a well-developed Tertiary can interfere. Since we're speaking of Extraverted functions, this would be a problem in particular with Extraverts that you don't know so well, or that you know in a particular setting which calls heavily on their Tertiary function.

    2- Sometimes we can mistake an Introverted function for an Extraverted one. My usual example is how I mistook my son's Tertiary Fi (if I typed him correctly as an INTJ) for an Auxiliary Fe (I thought he was INFJ at first), because he is so spontaneously affectionate around the family. It's only when he started going to kindergarten, and showed real emotional restraint, that I realised I got something wrong. Upon studying the alternate possibilities, I came to realise that a Tertiary Fi can look very much like Fe as long as the INTJ is around people he loves.

    3- Shadow functions! Some people have a very good relationship with one or both of their first two Shadow functions (much more rarely with the last two). So, for example, an INFJ with a very good use of Ne could confuse you into thinking that they might be an NP.

    4- Shadow functions still, but from another angle: some people may NOT have a very good relationship with their Shadow functions, and yet use them a lot. This usually has negative consequences, but you don't necessarily see it. For example, an INFJ in a self-defeating mood may use Ne a lot to shoot down possible positive scenarios that you would offer him. Again, this could confuse you into thinking that he might be an NP, if you don't realise that his use of Ne is not a healthy one.

    I hope I'm not overwhelming you? I'm not trying to discourage you, not at all! In fact, turned around, those "problems" can be used as positive tools! Like, if you notice that someone you've already typed as a probable Extravert uses an Extraverted function a lot but in a not-so-controlled or not-so-effective manner, this can clue you in to the fact that you might actually be observing their Tertiary. Or, if you know that someone is not feeling great, and they keep using one particular Extraverted function to make themselves miserable, then you may assume you've found a main Shadow function of theirs. See what I mean?

    I personally find all that stuff fascinating, so I apologise if I did overwhelm you!
    Dario Nardi writes a paper about how he believes that most adults use the sixth function fairly often.

    "The question here is that does dominant and secondary extraverted function resemble each other, e.g does Se look the same when it's dominant or secondary function?"

    That's where the archetypes (the use of that word is correct only in THIS context, by the way folks) come in. The dominant function is just what you do. To the person, it's the most fun/satisfying/ function to use, and is seen as a 'hero' by the person. When it's defined they think "wait, everybody else doesn't do that?" The secondary function develops a bit later, and devotes itself to 'parenting' others, teaching the world how to use the function better.

  5. #15
    Senior Member OctaviaCaesar's Avatar
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    As I have just finished reading "The Art of Speedreading People," the content of this thread reminds me of a section in the book. It talks about identifying people's type with clues as to whether their Feeling function is E or I: FJs and TPs have Fe and TJs and FPs have Fi. If you can figure out how a person uses Feeling, you can cut the pool of possible types at least in half.

    I think this is very cool.

  6. #16
    Aspie Idealist TaylorS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Did you notice any deficiencies in Ne along the way as well? (Usually a weak Ne becomes apparent in stress situations.)
    Well, a lot of abstract stuff I talk about seems to go right over her head. :rolli:
    Autistic INFP


  7. #17
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TaylorS View Post
    Well, a lot of abstract stuff I talk about seems to go right over her head. :rolli:
    lol... or she is just actually indifferent to. (As in, "Meh, I follow... but what does it matter?")

    Well, usually what I see is the ISFJ making lots of paranoid Ne connections, unless they have developed their Ne. Small things that have no real correlation to each other (from experience) are treated as if they are strongly and directly connected.

    Usually the fears are focused on relationships or culture influences. ISTJs often start out by having "conspiracy theorist" style ideas, where their Ne is flaring wildly and they make connections that might seem real to them but actually are not strongly related.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  8. #18
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    I don't think that it would be that easy to determine one's dominant type unless you know them intimately or at least are able to observe them while at home. Introverts show their auxilary function to the world, thus making it hard to determine whether you are seeing the actual person or a personna. INTPs could resemble ENTPs, ENTJs/INTJs and so on.

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