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  1. #31
    full of love Kingfisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Eyebrows View Post
    Why a red light? They could've intended it to mean something. They could've chosen it because it's a pretty color. It could telling us to be passionate, since that's a common cultural association with the color. The word of God is colored red in "red letter" editions of the Bible.. does it have something to do with that?
    and red is supposed to have the strongest and most immediate physical response, the most visceral and emotional reaction.


    also, i totaled a 1976 Firebird in an accident- the other car wasn't damaged at all, and my insurance didn't change a penny. read MBTI into that however you will, haha.

  2. #32
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander29 View Post
    So, I've been driving for more than 20 years. No real accidents to speak of (one 16 year hit me from behind and sheared off a bumper 10 years ago). You might say I'm a pretty good driver.

    It seems that people who are dominant or auxiliary Se would have an inherent advantage in doing this activity.

    For me, while being very aware of the upcoming terrain, what's happening way in front and to the side, and predicting the behaviors of other cars based on some nuance of their behavior that I'm typically unsure of, driving seems like pretty much an unconscious process. I spend most of the time zoned out or thinking about more interesting things. Would it be like that for a Dom or Aux Se? How do other people experience this activity?

    Because Se is not a physical action; it's a mindset. It's an attitude, an approach to life, a way of seeing and interpreting the world.

    You don't have to "use Se" to drive a car or see things around you any more than you have to "use Fi" to feel emotions or "use Te" to make plans. Se is an attitude that encourages us to trust our gut feelings, place emphasis on literal/surface meaning and do whatever feels right and makes the strongest immediate impact at the current moment.

    This strikes at one of the biggest misconceptions regarding functional theory in general. You are not "using a different function" every time you perform any given action. The term "using a function" is in itself rather misleading.

    Don't think of the functions as actions--think of them as different perspectives, different lenses to look through at different times. In order to "use Se" you must actually see from the perspective of Se's attitude and grasp the reasoning behind it firsthand. You don't do Se things; you do things for Se reasons.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?
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  3. #33
    Senior Member sculpting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Eyebrows View Post
    Soooo.... those with inferior Se can't drive cars, and those with primary Se also can't drive cars?

    .. can anyone drive cars?


    We can "reason" about typology in such a way as to support pretty much any conclusion that we want to draw about any cognitive function. It's beautiful.
    prjfa'poewjfa/;lkewjf/lkaw/lkhkjhojujjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj jjjjj

    Typology = magic

  4. #34
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    Because Se is not a physical action; it's a mindset. It's an attitude, an approach to life, a way of seeing and interpreting the world.

    You don't have to "use Se" to drive a car or see things around you any more than you have to "use Fi" to feel emotions or "use Te" to make plans. Se is an attitude that encourages us to trust our gut feelings, place emphasis on literal/surface meaning and do whatever feels right and makes the strongest immediate impact at the current moment.

    This strikes at one of the biggest misconceptions regarding functional theory in general. You are not "using a different function" every time you perform any given action. The term "using a function" is in itself rather misleading.

    Don't think of the functions as actions--think of them as different perspectives, different lenses to look through at different times. In order to "use Se" you must actually see from the perspective of Se's attitude and grasp the reasoning behind it firsthand. You don't do Se things; you do things for Se reasons.
    This is one of the best explanations of Jungian functions I've ever read. Listen to this man.

    Weak Se doesn't make you physically incompetent, but strong Se will often lead one to make choices that improve physical coordination.

  5. #35
    Senior Member sculpting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    Because Se is not a physical action; it's a mindset. It's an attitude, an approach to life, a way of seeing and interpreting the world.

    You don't have to "use Se" to drive a car or see things around you any more than you have to "use Fi" to feel emotions or "use Te" to make plans. Se is an attitude that encourages us to trust our gut feelings, place emphasis on literal/surface meaning and do whatever feels right and makes the strongest immediate impact at the current moment.

    This strikes at one of the biggest misconceptions regarding functional theory in general. You are not "using a different function" every time you perform any given action. The term "using a function" is in itself rather misleading.

    Don't think of the functions as actions--think of them as different perspectives, different lenses to look through at different times. In order to "use Se" you must actually see from the perspective of Se's attitude and grasp the reasoning behind it firsthand. You don't do Se things; you do things for Se reasons.
    But-in the point of the thread-Se the process of perceiving information-of transferring base sensory input into something our brains can use and pass judgment upon. Se takes that sensory information at face value, while Ne has to connect it to other things in order to incorporate it.

    So-to the point of the thread-an Se dom should be more in tune with immediate sensations-thus able to respond more quickly to changes in those incoming sensations than an Ne dom. Thus drive better.

    It is almost like you just assigned judging capabilities to Se. Am I confused?

  6. #36
    `~~Philosoflying~~` SillySapienne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander29 View Post
    So, I've been driving for more than 20 years. No real accidents to speak of (one 16 year hit me from behind and sheared off a bumper 10 years ago). You might say I'm a pretty good driver.

    It seems that people who are dominant or auxiliary Se would have an inherent advantage in doing this activity.

    For me, while being very aware of the upcoming terrain, what's happening way in front and to the side, and predicting the behaviors of other cars based on some nuance of their behavior that I'm typically unsure of, driving seems like pretty much an unconscious process. I spend most of the time zoned out or thinking about more interesting things. Would it be like that for a Dom or Aux Se? How do other people experience this activity?
    I don't particularly like driving, but it takes ZERO conscious brain power, which is awesome, lends me plenty of time to daydream.

    `
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    "That that is, is. That that is not, is not. Is that it? It is."

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  7. #37
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orobas View Post
    But-in the point of the thread-Se the process of perceiving information-of transferring base sensory input into something our brains can use and pass judgment upon. Se takes that sensory information at face value, while Ne has to connect it to other things in order to incorporate it.

    So-to the point of the thread-an Se dom should be more in tune with immediate sensations-thus able to respond more quickly to changes in those incoming sensations than an Ne dom. Thus drive better.

    It is almost like you just assigned judging capabilities to Se. Am I confused?
    In a way, perceiving functions do "judge." They're oriented towards specific qualities in data. Se, "makes a decision" to pay attention to visceral, physical detail, and notices opportunities to make an immediate impact. Ne "makes a decision" to pay attention to connections between objects, possibilities, and notices opportunities/avenues to change something in the future. Obviously, these aren't decisions made by the function user, they're implicit qualities of the functions themselves.

    I like his "lense" example, though I tend to use the word "filter," but it's really the same idea. If anything, I fall on that old Russian meme, in that "You don't use functions, functions use you."



  8. #38
    Pumpernickel
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    If my inferior is Se, then how can I drive a car?
    Very slowly!

  9. #39
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    Actually, the couple of ESTPs that I know are the worst drivers I have ever seen. Hmm..

    I wonder if your type has anything to do with it... like if you're an SJ you'd be making decisions based on driving rules rather than immediate cues from your surroundings. Or if you're Ni you'd be like "HO SHIT if I don't stop immediately, this sequence of events will unfold that will result in my untimely death!!"

  10. #40
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustHer View Post
    Actually, the couple of ESTPs that I know are the worst drivers I have ever seen. Hmm..

    I wonder if your type has anything to do with it... like if you're an SJ you'd be making decisions based on driving rules rather than immediate cues from your surroundings. Or if you're Ni you'd be like "HO SHIT if I don't stop immediately, this sequence of events will unfold that will result in my untimely death!!"
    Si doesn't inherently pay attention to rules on principle. Si is based on relating new information to sensory data that's been absorbed from previous experience. It likes predictability.

    This makes rules a convenient way to know what to expect, but it's a common misconception that SJs follow rules because they're some kind of mindless traditionalism zombies.

    If SJs follow traffic rules, it's because they've followed traffic rules in the past and so that's the best way to achieve the predictable result they've internalized from previous experience.

    In my experience, more SJs than you'd think are rather aggressive/reckless drivers because they get upset when traffic/other drivers throw off their schedules. "I need to get where I'm going to do what I've planned, dammit!"

    SPs are sometimes reckless drivers for different reasons--they like the physical thrill of moving fast and taking risks.


    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    This is one of the best explanations of Jungian functions I've ever read. Listen to this man.

    Weak Se doesn't make you physically incompetent, but strong Se will often lead one to make choices that improve physical coordination.
    This means a lot coming from you! Thank you.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

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