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View Poll Results: What is your favorite book on typology?

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50. You may not vote on this poll
  • Please Understand Me

    2 4.00%
  • Gifts Differing

    3 6.00%
  • Personality Type An Owners Manual

    15 30.00%
  • Type Talk

    0 0%
  • Principles of Typology

    2 4.00%
  • Psychological Types (Jung)

    12 24.00%
  • Type Talk at Work

    0 0%
  • Please Understand Me 2

    7 14.00%
  • Beside Ourselves

    0 0%
  • Introduction to Type and the Eight [8] Jungian Functions (MBTI) - Hartzler

    0 0%
  • Other - Please Specify

    9 18.00%
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Results 21 to 30 of 65

  1. #21
    Member Super Nova's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander29 View Post
    Until I read Thompson, I always thought Gifts Differing was the best. Anybody else a fan of this book?
    The poll was a tough call for me because I like both Lenore Thomson's book *and* "Gifts Differing" equally well. This is just my personal opinion, but I also like the various books by Paul Tieger and Barbara Barron-Tieger.
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  2. #22
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    I find its highly technical presentation and language far more accessible to my own thought; like MLF I don't like the fluffy, pop culturey language that plagues most of these books, which tend to take on a "self-help" vibe. I prefer an analytical focus.

    Not to mention, Thomson's book was just garbage. She had so many "This is a typical XXXX thing to do" followed with a specific instance that could apply to anybody. And I almost set the book on fire when, upon reading the description for INTP, she said [I'm paraphrasing here] INTPs have difficulty in school because it's an Extraverted Thinking institution and they don't like too much abstract reasoning. WTF!?!?!
    Based on what you've said, it seems you'd like Solitary Walker's book (Principles of Typology). Have your read it?

    I don't recall the reference to extraverted thinking or abstract reasoning but do think that Ns can be bored with the rote memorization at the grammar school level and are more enthusiastic about the conceptual orientation in college or more advanced high school courses. Grammer school - largely taught by S and College mostly taught by N creates bias towards one or the other type of student in some ways. Well - it resonated with me anyway.

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  3. #23
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Super Nova View Post
    The poll was a tough call for me because I like both Lenore Thomson's book *and* "Gifts Differing" equally well. This is just my personal opinion, but I also like the various books by Paul Tieger and Barbara Barron-Tieger.
    It's close for me. Gifts differing for the elegant simplicity (I had to read it several times before I got it all). Lenore for the sheer insight, practicality and depth of analysis. A bit too creative maybe.

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  4. #24
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ObliviousExistence View Post
    the one and only, Psychological Types by C. G. Jung. Almost every other typology book is based on his ideas and theories. I wouldn't waste my time on any other typology book. Every Tom Dick and Harry is making a book on typology by trying to capitalize on Jungs work by purporting to clarify or systematize his theories.
    Forgive me but isn't this a bit like saying we should drive the Model T because Henry Ford was the one who is generally regarded as the father of mass production of automobiles. Those new cars are all just cheap derivations.

    There has been progress in evolving the thinking and practical application which would appear to be a useful thing. It's like with a car. Seat belts, air bags, automatic ignition, stereos, ergonomic seating, more powerful/efficient engines, rust-proofing. Progress is a good thing.

    I think Jung's book is incredible, groundbreaking, rich with ideas/information. It is also dense and wordy where it doesn't need to be. It's hard to get through.

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  5. #25
    Senior Member surgery's Avatar
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    I've read Personality Type, Gifts Differing and 8 Keys to Self-Leadership by Dario Nardi.

    I voted for Thomson's book because it extensively defines the functions and explains how they effect behavior. Personally, I thought she did a good job of not generalizing behavior that is really just specific to the individual. Instead, she provided reasoning about how those common behaviors come about as a result of the functions interacting with each other.

    Honestly, I had to read the INFP profile a couple of times over before it truly began to resonate with me. Once I did, however, it was surprisingly insightful in its explanation the effects of the tertiary and inferior functions. That being said, INFPs who are Nines on the enneagram may have an easier time relating directly to the descriptions, I think. One problem, I had, though, was the she wrote extensively about the importance of developing the auxiliary function, but her advice for doing so is very opened. But really, how could I expect a mathematical formula?

    Nardi's book focuses exclusively on defining the functions using more technical language as well as providing many exercises for developing each one. So, in this respect, it's a helpful guide because the material is so concrete. Unfortunately, I became skeptical of his information when he started to take the "mystical" approach to introverted Intuition. Unfortunately, much of his writing directly opposes that of Thomson's. For example, he says that extraverted Feeling "requires us to be personal, compassionate and without hard boundaries" (123). On the other hand, she writes: "Ultimately, a exclusive reliance on Extraverted Feeling leads to anything but a reliance on emotion. Extraverted Feeling types ignore their immediate impressions and focus only on social obligations" (321).

    Additionally, he recommends focusing development on the auxiliary, tertiary and inferior functions, while Thomson says to focus only on the auxiliary.

  6. #26
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by surgery View Post
    I've read Personality Type, Gifts Differing and 8 Keys to Self-Leadership by Dario Nardi.

    I voted for Thomson's book because it extensively defines the functions and explains how they effect behavior. Personally, I thought she did a good job of not generalizing behavior that is really just specific to the individual. Instead, she provided reasoning about how those common behaviors come about as a result of the functions interacting with each other.

    Honestly, I had to read the INFP profile a couple of times over before it truly began to resonate with me. Once I did, however, it was surprisingly insightful in its explanation the effects of the tertiary and inferior functions. That being said, INFPs who are Nines on the enneagram may have an easier time relating directly to the descriptions, I think. One problem, I had, though, was the she wrote extensively about the importance of developing the auxiliary function, but her advice for doing so is very opened. But really, how could I expect a mathematical formula?

    Nardi's book focuses exclusively on defining the functions using more technical language as well as providing many exercises for developing each one. So, in this respect, it's a helpful guide because the material is so concrete. Unfortunately, I became skeptical of his information when he started to take the "mystical" approach to introverted Intuition. Unfortunately, much of his writing directly opposes that of Thomson's. For example, he says that extraverted Feeling "requires us to be personal, compassionate and without hard boundaries" (123). On the other hand, she writes: "Ultimately, a exclusive reliance on Extraverted Feeling leads to anything but a reliance on emotion. Extraverted Feeling types ignore their immediate impressions and focus only on social obligations" (321).

    Additionally, he recommends focusing development on the auxiliary, tertiary and inferior functions, while Thomson says to focus only on the auxiliary.
    Would you say Nardi is good then? Haven't seen that one.

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  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander29 View Post
    Would you say Nardi is good then? Haven't seen that one.
    There is quite a lot available in google books.

  8. #28
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    Nardi is more aligned with Berens and the approach of treating the eight function-attitudes as solid fixed units (where Lenore is more Junian in seeing four functions, two orientations. Or at least she has become more that way since writing the book). Nardi is the creator of the cognitive process test we have featured on here.

    Jock; I'm looking for that reference about INTP's and Te education. I think I've seen it somewhere, but so far, not in the section on INTP's. In that section, p.312, it does mention INTP's difficulty defending their ideas in terms with extraverted Logic and that they aren't taslking abotu the same things that concern left-brain [Je] thinking types.
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  9. #29
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric B View Post

    Jock; I'm looking for that reference about INTP's and Te education. I think I've seen it somewhere, but so far, not in the section on INTP's. In that section, p.312, it does mention INTP's difficulty defending their ideas in terms with extraverted Logic and that they aren't taslking abotu the same things that concern left-brain [Je] thinking types.
    I actually looked it up last night, but it was during her more general description of ITPs. I still think her version of Ti is more TiSe than it is TiNe. She defines it as instinctual, gut logic, but that's really not what I experience. I could be biased though.



  10. #30
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander29 View Post
    Based on what you've said, it seems you'd like Solitary Walker's book (Principles of Typology). Have your read it?

    I don't recall the reference to extraverted thinking or abstract reasoning but do think that Ns can be bored with the rote memorization at the grammar school level and are more enthusiastic about the conceptual orientation in college or more advanced high school courses. Grammer school - largely taught by S and College mostly taught by N creates bias towards one or the other type of student in some ways. Well - it resonated with me anyway.
    Yes, I've been thinking about buying it because I've heard good things. I just hate waiting for stuff to come in the mail!

    The thing is, your explanation makes perfect sense. Lenore's did not. If anything, Ti is too abstract because it really doesn't seize on anything concrete about objects. Saying that ITPs have trouble with abstract thought is completely retarded. An ITP without good secondary function use completely loses touch with the world, and "abstracts" themselves into incoherence.

    It was funny, because she wrote "ITPs won't explain it this way, but Ti is like blahblahblah." Well no shit we won't explain it that way, because it's absurd nonsense.



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