User Tag List

First 789

Results 81 to 83 of 83

  1. #81
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    953 sp/so
    Posts
    5,708

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    I went something like this (may mixed E/I for the first 2):

    ISFP - INFP - INTP - ENTP - INTJ - ENTJ

    ISFP period - the ignorance was very enjoyable.
    INFP period - the emotions were really annoying.
    INTP period - the compliance was illogical and frustrating.
    ENTP period - people disliking my thoughts combined with the lack of social interaction of the previous INTP image made it into a really bad situation.
    INTJ period - I liked the organization, more down-to-earth ideas, standing up for myself, etc..
    ENTJ period - I do like the practical approach a lot, and I do like the idea of confrontation. I find it very useful and quite fun.

    ISFP - INFP were before mid-school and a bit of mid-school.
    INTP was mid-school and a little bit of high-school.
    ENTP and INTJ was high-school and a bit after high-school.
    ENTJ since a bit after high-school.

    How's that for a change?
    Heh.

    It suggests that you are confusing the type descriptions with the actual type. Reasonable people may differ on what constitutes type, but in my opinion, MBTI type is better defined in terms of "how you think", and not "what you appear to be". Visible personality changes over the years, especially in childhood. INTJs act just as silly and childish as ISFPs, at that age. And when the INTJ matures and the ISFP matures into their 40s and later, neither one is especially childish at that point. But the paths that each of those types take from childhood to adulthood strongly differs.

    INTJs start out very childish and silly, but as they learn - and especially once they get to the parts of their education that emphasizes NT-style reasoning over SJ-style reasoning - they start to shine and excel in ways that the ISFPs tend not to. Not that that ISFPs do poorly, necessarily, but academics is generally not the focus of their type.

    Interestingly, something odd happens as these two types age into later years. The INTJs tend to gradually start pursuing very ISFP areas of interest, while ISFPs start looking at education and technical know-how much more closely. Personally, I started getting interested in dancing, and have been an avid dancer for several years now. An ISFP of my acquaintance was (and is), a wannabe rock star, regularly plays in local bands and so on, but when he realized that wasn't a money-making pursuit, changed tack and began to excel in being able to explain complicated software (e.g., PeopleSoft) to his employer's clients. Now, I didn't become an ISFP: my approach to dancing is far more analytical than that type would ever tolerate (I dance in my head!), and my acquaintance didn't become an INTJ. But we both grew into adopting more of the traits that are associated with one's opposite type.

    Opposite how? INTJ functions are Ni-Te-Fi-Se, while ISFP functions are Fi-Se-Ni-Te. Given that MBTI is really just classifying the first two functions, that means an INTJ has an "inner ISFP", and the ISFP has an "inner INTJ". These opposites are kind of our "shadow selves" that we create as we emphasize our type. INTJs work on eliminating their ISFP-ish traits even as they develop their INTJ-ish ones, and vice versa, but the shadow is always there, and it's there because it is suppressed. (This is one of Jung's key insights, in my opinion.) As one matures and gradually learns that one's primary approach isn't suitable to all aspects of life, one gradually adopts the methods that one previously shunned, and becomes a much better person thereby.
    T
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  2. #82
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AffirmitiveAnxiety View Post
    Yeah that's what I was wondering about. See you typed about different periods of type ...I must have misread it then, so was it that you liked those elements of the types or was it the way people reacted to your type?
    It was me thinking about me, not me thinking about what people are thinking about me.

    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Heh.

    It suggests that you are confusing the type descriptions with the actual type. Reasonable people may differ on what constitutes type, but in my opinion, MBTI type is better defined in terms of "how you think", and not "what you appear to be". Visible personality changes over the years, especially in childhood. INTJs act just as silly and childish as ISFPs, at that age. And when the INTJ matures and the ISFP matures into their 40s and later, neither one is especially childish at that point. But the paths that each of those types take from childhood to adulthood strongly differs.

    INTJs start out very childish and silly, but as they learn - and especially once they get to the parts of their education that emphasizes NT-style reasoning over SJ-style reasoning - they start to shine and excel in ways that the ISFPs tend not to. Not that that ISFPs do poorly, necessarily, but academics is generally not the focus of their type.

    Interestingly, something odd happens as these two types age into later years. The INTJs tend to gradually start pursuing very ISFP areas of interest, while ISFPs start looking at education and technical know-how much more closely. Personally, I started getting interested in dancing, and have been an avid dancer for several years now. An ISFP of my acquaintance was (and is), a wannabe rock star, regularly plays in local bands and so on, but when he realized that wasn't a money-making pursuit, changed tack and began to excel in being able to explain complicated software (e.g., PeopleSoft) to his employer's clients. Now, I didn't become an ISFP: my approach to dancing is far more analytical than that type would ever tolerate (I dance in my head!), and my acquaintance didn't become an INTJ. But we both grew into adopting more of the traits that are associated with one's opposite type.

    Opposite how? INTJ functions are Ni-Te-Fi-Se, while ISFP functions are Fi-Se-Ni-Te. Given that MBTI is really just classifying the first two functions, that means an INTJ has an "inner ISFP", and the ISFP has an "inner INTJ". These opposites are kind of our "shadow selves" that we create as we emphasize our type. INTJs work on eliminating their ISFP-ish traits even as they develop their INTJ-ish ones, and vice versa, but the shadow is always there, and it's there because it is suppressed. (This is one of Jung's key insights, in my opinion.) As one matures and gradually learns that one's primary approach isn't suitable to all aspects of life, one gradually adopts the methods that one previously shunned, and becomes a much better person thereby.
    T
    I was talking about the way I thought/think, not the way I appear/ed to be.

    The rest of the post - interesting.

  3. #83
    You're fired. Lol. Antimony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    8w7 sx/sp
    Socionics
    ????
    Posts
    3,437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Anyone who frequents MBTI forums sees people questioning their type and on occasion changing their type. Usually it's something simple, like INTJ to INFJ, or ISTJ to ESTJ. Simple, one-letter changes, as one gradually adjusts one's self understanding.

    But what about the big changes? I've seen a few, with a brief summary of reasons.

    INTJ to ENTP - better understanding of MBTI
    ISFP to INTP - rather young in the first place
    ENFJ to INTJ - optimistic person who went through difficult trials

    What kind of type changes have you seen? And what do you think the reasons were?

    How much is lack of understanding? How much is that one really hasn't faced a real trial in life? How much is it just that MBTI is a pseudo-science and cannot be used with precision?
    ISFP to ENFJ: dramatic life experiences, deeper understanding of self and others
    INxP to ENTP: better understanding of MBTI (specifically functions and introversion)- this is me. I used to type as INFP in middle school, but come high school, it was ENTP, and has been for several years.

    I can't really think of any others. Most people I know remain fairly consistent.
    Excuse me, but does this smell like chloroform to you?

    Always reserve the right to become smarter at a future point in time, for only a fool limits themselves to all they knew in the past. -Alex

Similar Threads

  1. [INFP] What is the best way to tell an INFP you love them?
    By demaugustus in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 05-05-2016, 03:20 PM
  2. What's the most evil of all types????
    By am_i_evil666 in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 235
    Last Post: 05-16-2015, 04:35 PM
  3. What is 'the greatest evil'?
    By iwakar in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 94
    Last Post: 06-15-2012, 08:06 PM
  4. INTJ's natural skill. I wonder, what are the natural skills of other types?
    By Chimerical in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-13-2010, 04:03 PM
  5. What are the most sought after personality types? and the ones you detest...
    By curiousel in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 98
    Last Post: 08-11-2010, 10:06 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO