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  1. #1
    Senior Member alcea rosea's Avatar
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    Default Terrible generalization about authors (S/N)?

    Just wondering...

    In many type descriptions it is said that people with S-function prefer fact based literature and people with N-function prefer fiction. If this is true then according to the "theory" S-people would write fact based literature and N-people fiction.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Wannabe genius Splittet's Avatar
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    Nah, I think many Ss both write and read fiction, although few Ss probably write fantasy or science-fiction. Enough Ss read though, but mainly quite mainstream fantasy and science-fiction, like Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings. I would rather say Ss tend to read down to earth fiction.

  3. #3
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    I have some S friends that read fantasy by the truckload. I think N's tend to like a wider variety of genres, while S's latch onto a few they like and stick with those. That's all I can really say about the S/N divide and reading.
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    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    I much prefer fantasy>scifi>regular fiction>non-fiction as far as entertainment goes, but I read a lot of non-fiction books (almost always science, usually biology) for fun. Non-fiction doesn't make me feel guilty for wasting time reading trash.

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    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    That distinction is far too simplistic.

    For example, if I had to guess, I would say that Robert Jordan (who has written a fantasy series long and large enough to choke a yak suffering giganticism) is an S of some sort. Other S types would be Tom Clancy and John Grisham.

    But you get Alice Sebold ("The Lovely Bones") who is pretty clearly an INFJ (based on style and her rape bio called "Lucky") who is writing "realistic fiction" with a bit of fantastic element in it. And Stephen King (ENTP), who writes horror and yet has a very good ear for the "real" and anchors his imagination in it, versus a pure fantasist like Terry "Shannara" Brooks or Neil Gaiman.

    What you need to look at is how the topic matter is treated, along with total type. S's can write fantasy, but they tend to do it differently than the stereotypical N might; and vice versa.

    (For example, I notice than INFJ writers -- despite being N -- usually focus a lot on "realism" in their stories. Their stories are firmly anchored in concrete detail, along with the ramifications of those details.)
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Gabe's Avatar
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    yea, la-de da to that one. I read more non-fiction than fiction.

  7. #7
    Senior Member DaRick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe View Post
    I read more non-fiction than fiction.
    Yeah, so do I. Apparently, the difference is that N's prefer analogies and figurative language to literal language and 'straight-talking'. I personally think that analogies can enhance literary mediums, if used in moderation, but I prefer writers to communicate their point clearly. Otherwise, it means that 1) they don't have one, 2) they may be intentionally trying to mislead you, or 3) they're covering for a lack of depth by cramming their book with contrived analogies.

    The other N's I observe (stronger N's than I, actually) tend to enjoy fantasy more than I do, although I don't mind science-fiction.
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  8. #8
    Free-Rangin' Librarian Jae Rae's Avatar
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    I read almost exclusively nonfiction, but I like literary biographies and autobiographies. MY ENTP best friend is the same, although he likes Sci Fi. My INTP husband reads Jane Austen, but mostly nonfiction.

    I read Catcher in the Rye about five years ago (recommended by the ENTP), and adored it.

    Jae Rae

  9. #9
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    I write a lot, and like Jennifer said, my stories normally have a bit of realism to them. However, I'm usually anchored around a certain feeling or situation & the characters are growing or improving throughout the story.

    Very similiar to Alice Sebold, actually - Jennifer, thanks for bringing light to her as a possible INFJ. I knew I related well to her style of writing & I couldn't pinpoint why. In both of her novels, the characters are put at a disadvantage and then rising above it & growing from the experience.

    I've written stories where a character was from a unfortunate family situation, drug addiction, etc. The story would focus on what that individual character is feeling and doing to improve their situation.

    As for reading, I tend to read all sorts of books. I can certainly handle the abstract, some sci fi, and I do love fiction. However, I tend to like travel literature (I think because I travel often & everytime I read about someone's travels, I get motivated to put more money into my savings account for my next big trip!) and I also like non fiction IF it is focused on human struggle and perseverance. Stories about accomplishing goals tend to motivate me as well.

    This all probably ties in with the stereotype that the INFJ is the "self help" type. I certainly see that in my reading & writing.

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