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  1. #1
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    Default 2 Simple questions about MBTI (personality change).

    1. My first question would be can one's personality preference permanently change?

    2. My second question would be can a person as a child have a totally different mbti type preference then when he has fully developed?

    These are the same questions as my other thread but I guess the other thread name indicates I was to give information. If one of the two threads were to be deleted I'd hope it's the other one.
    Last edited by Bellflower; 03-05-2010 at 02:08 PM. Reason: Thought it would help if the topic was more evident

  2. #2
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    1. My first question would be can one's personality preference permanently change?
    I'm no expert, but I know that 10 years ago I tested ENTJ.

    Two years ago I tested ESTP.

    My default mode of existence is certainly ESTP.

    But, depending on what work I am doing, who I am working with, and the overall atmosphere of my environemtn, I will most certainly exhibit traits typical to any of the ExTx types.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ragingkatsuki View Post
    2. My second question would be can a person as a child have a totally different mbti type preference then when he has fully developed?
    I don't think I changed, I think when I was younger I had only partially implemented my programming.
    --------------------
    Type Stats:
    MBTI -> (E) 77.14% | (i) 22.86% ; (S) 60% | (n) 40% ; (T) 72.22% | (f) 27.78% ; (P) 51.43% | (j) 48.57%
    BIG 5 -> Extroversion 77% ; Accommodation 60% ; Orderliness 62% ; Emotional Stability 64% ; Open Mindedness 74%

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    "If somebody asks your MBTI type on a first date, run". -Donna Cecilia
    "Enneagram is psychological underpinnings. Cognitive Functions are mental reasoning and perceptional processes. -Sanjuro

  3. #3
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    I'm no expert, but I know that 10 years ago I tested ENTJ.

    Two years ago I tested ESTP.

    My default mode of existence is certainly ESTP.

    But, depending on what work I am doing, who I am working with, and the overall atmosphere of my environemtn, I will most certainly exhibit traits typical to any of the ExTx types.
    I see. That's interesting. But was your default mode back 10 years ago an ESTJ or do you think you were perhaps mistyped due to the circumstances back then?

    I don't think I changed, I think when I was younger I had only partially implemented my programming.
    Hmmm, yes that makes sense. The thing is some people believe they changed drastically since they were younger. So it brings questions such as the one's I put down here.

  4. #4
    No Cigar Litvyak's Avatar
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    1. I believe so. Most members won't share my opinion, but I think unexpected events, revelations and even major choices may change people's types. A change in preferences or the "focus" in life makes us overdevelop some functions and disregard others, so it is practically impossible (and totally useless) to tell whether or not they were dominant before. It is not something set in stone, since the hereditary aspects of MBTI are questionable, and people constantly change throughout their lives.

    2. It is possible. I think it's pretty self-explanatory after my first point. Children are especially easy to shape.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Litvyak View Post
    Most members won't share my opinion, but I think unexpected events, revelations and even major choices may change people's types. A change in preferences or the "focus" in life makes us overdevelop some functions and disregard others, so it is practically impossible (and totally useless) to tell whether or not they were dominant before. It is not something set in stone, since the hereditary aspects of MBTI are questionable, and people constantly change throughout their lives.
    I'm not most members.
    I agree with you, 100%.

  6. #6
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    I would say that if you have some functions that are rather close it would be almost easy to switch what type you are based on the situation and your surroundings- for instance, in a college atmosphere where I needed to use intuition more often than sensing it turned into my default mode... like if my brain was rewired by constantly thinking another way.

    Now out in the real world I've slipped out of that mode.

    A few years ago I tended to test as an Introvert... consistantly

    so to answer question 1- I think that development and circumstance can change a person's personality

    for question 2? I don't think that people's personalities are fully developed by that point, so it would be EASY to be different than you were as a child (and I was a very J child... I loosened up CONSIDERABLY with age!)
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  7. #7
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Litvyak View Post
    1. I believe so. Most members won't share my opinion, but I think unexpected events, revelations and even major choices may change people's types. A change in preferences or the "focus" in life makes us overdevelop some functions and disregard others, so it is practically impossible (and totally useless) to tell whether or not they were dominant before. It is not something set in stone, since the hereditary aspects of MBTI are questionable, and people constantly change throughout their lives.

    2. It is possible. I think it's pretty self-explanatory after my first point. Children are especially easy to shape.
    Yes, I see. This of course, makes a lot of sense. It's a reasonable view that can hopefully be furthered.

    I'm also wondering about the arguments of those who do not believe that it can change. They may bear some interesting points themselves.

    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    I would say that if you have some functions that are rather close it would be almost easy to switch what type you are based on the situation and your surroundings- for instance, in a college atmosphere where I needed to use intuition more often than sensing it turned into my default mode... like if my brain was rewired by constantly thinking another way.

    Now out in the real world I've slipped out of that mode.

    A few years ago I tended to test as an Introvert... consistantly

    so to answer question 1- I think that development and circumstance can change a person's personality

    for question 2? I don't think that people's personalities are fully developed by that point, so it would be EASY to be different than you were as a child (and I was a very J child... I loosened up CONSIDERABLY with age!)
    This adds up to the views of it being able to change. And I would never have suspected you were an introvert or a judger. Very good.

  8. #8
    Senior Member sculpting's Avatar
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    When I was a kid I was raised in a very stressful home. I spoke to no one, was very shy, and lived in my head mostly.

    I would have struck most people as exceptionally introverted to the point of it being an issue. I learned to socially converse when others at about 17 or so. I would have been a decided INFP at this point.

    In high school I moved into the sciences and went to undergrad in the sciences. I was surrounded by NTPs. I became mildly extroverted but everything I did was analytical. I was just a bit sillier on the rare occasion I was extroverted. I would have scored as an ENTP at this point.

    In grad school I became more accepting of who I am, and realized I had this weird silly underbelly. Somewhere I learned how to feel things. I found MBTI at this point and I tested as an ENTP, then an ENFP, then an ENTP. But my ENTP friend laughed and said the enfp made more sense. (At this point our INTJ tested as an INTJ, promptly retook the test and tested as an INFP)

    The whole time I was really an ENFP in varying states of growth but the test cant capture that. The test is flawed for this reason.

  9. #9
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    It depends on what you mean by change.

    Let's take a more tangible aspect of the person, to clarify what I mean: The body.

    Your body changes as you get older. The change itself in general can be anticipated, explained, predicted even if not to a very granular level... although I think this more based on the complexity of factors involved and not a lack of a pattern and consistency.

    It can also be impacted by food, exercise, acute stressors (e.g., accidents/trauma), environmental factors (e.g., radiation, weather, water/sun) and so forth.

    [For example, the same child might grow a lot taller if provided consistent calcium in the diet. I have two sons within 15 months of each other. Barring variation in the genetic code, I can't say both of them would be tall... but one has a condition where he cannot absorb fats without medical assistance. Accordingly, the older is 6'4"+ at this point, while the one who is 15 months younger is only 5'2" after a growth spurt. 14" is a pretty high variance, and I can be pretty certain that his inability to utilize fat contributed to a caloric shortage that stunted his growth... and in fact this is what doctors state emphatically about children with his condition.]

    So it's pretty clear that the body itself can change to accommodate survival in the environment or simply be impacted greatly by the circumstances it finds itself in. The body can also be modified purposefully, from the geeks / blockheads and body-modification artists to women who get breast implants, athletes who do steriods, etc.

    But note that it doesn't mean the body did not have an original template that can persist or that operates as the foundation and can still exert itself regardless. My son is Caucasian; he could try to do things to make himself appear a member of another race but he would still have Caucasian genetics, and the modifications would not permeate all levels of his body. (For a counter example, examine Michael Jackson; he "became" white ... but not convincingly -- and only after the expenditure of great deals of money many people could never acquire.) He is a boy, not a girl; and even if someone can change their body, genetics don't change [yet] and so s/he would be sterile and unable to bear children. (Interestingly, if caught in utero at the right time, the body can deviate from the genetics ... but again, not without residual effects.) Height can't be changed easily, bone stucture for many areas of the body cannot be changed without damaging it, etc.

    So the body can drastically change and be changed... but there is still a pattern.

    I think personality is even more difficult to quantify because, unlike the body (which we can dissect and examine minutely), we never get a perfect baseline on the human psyche. We're stuck examining the end product at best and working backwards. But it makes sense that it also works similarly... a baseline/set of initial conditions and instructions that then are modified as life proceeds... all while this "hardware under construction" can be wired with various types of "mental software / operating systems."

    But the biggest support for some sort of stable personality is that people are generally consistent over the course of their lives, and when they are random or inconsistent, it reduces practical efficacy and they can't function in society.


    * * * * *

    As far as MBTI goes... I think the theory ASSUMES there is something foundational (the "preferences") within personality. Whether that is true or not? I think it is somewhat true, but there's a large capacity for change in the human psyche. The thing to remember is that changes usually are not complete changes, they are just patches laid overtop the old behavior or not quite meshing up if a piece is merely "excised."
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  10. #10
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Puppy View Post
    The whole time I was really an ENFP in varying states of growth but the test cant capture that. The test is flawed for this reason.
    Hmmm. So you are saying you were always an ENFP but temporarity other types as indicative of your ENFP growth? Interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    So the body can drastically change and be changed... but there is still a pattern.

    I think personality is even more difficult to quantify because, unlike the body (which we can dissect and examine minutely), we never get a perfect baseline on the human psyche. We're stuck examining the end product at best and working backwards. But it makes sense that it also works similarly... a baseline/set of initial conditions and instructions that then are modified as life proceeds... all while this "hardware under construction" can be wired with various types of "mental software / operating systems."

    But the biggest support for some sort of stable personality is that people are generally consistent over the course of their lives, and when they are random or inconsistent, it reduces practical efficacy and they can't function in society.
    I see your point with the body changes. It does make sense that it works in the same way the body does. But this is not clear proof. There are far many loopholes to fully put it down as truth. This is why we can speculate the idea of changing the human psyche.
    It is also on another hand believable that the human psyche can be changed due to it's fluidity. It is not matter like that of a human body.

    As far as MBTI goes... I think the theory ASSUMES there is something foundational (the "preferences") within personality. Whether that is true or not? I think it is somewhat true, but there's a large capacity for change in the human psyche. The thing to remember is that changes usually are not complete changes, they are just patches laid overtop the old behavior or not quite meshing up if a piece is merely "excised."
    I see. And if one decides to fully patch onto their personality another wholly different personality type. Would that allow for change in type? Perhaps a blend would be made creating a dual personality.

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