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  1. #1
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
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    Default Survey of Typological Models

    Okay, I'm really tired of being corrected by people who think there is only one true type model, and that every expert is in perfect agreement.

    Consequently, I thought I'd try to sum up what I have found in the various type-related books I have access to. The main point here is to illustrate that there is not total agreement, and that opinions do, in fact, vary on how many functions are exist for a given type (consciously available and unconsciously available) and what that implies. I'd be happy to discuss my own biases and conclusions, but my aim here is to be relatively unbiased. Feel free to correct me (but give me source page numbers plus quotations). Also happy to add additional sources, as needed. Also, my Pros, Cons and Summaries reflect my own opinions, but I will gladly modify them based on feedback (although I reserve the right to push back).

    Note: I'm both an INFP and a master of typos, so I'm sure I've made errors and gotten details wrong. Just let me know (via either feedback or responses or PMs) and I'll do my best to correct things.

    ____________________________________

    Psychological Types
    by Carl Jung, Princeton University Press, 1971 (originally published 1921)

    Summary: The one that started it all. (Boy, did he need a editor to trim down and remove tangents!) Describes only 4 functions, but each can have an introverted/extraverted orientation in an individual. Seems to imply that there are only four functions available ever, and they become introverted/extroverted as a part of differentiation. Focuses mostly on the primary function (secondary functions are introduced VERY late... almost an after thought). Doesn't explicitly mention the orientation of secondary functions, and seems to use "auxiliary" synonymous with "secondary" (in fact, index says "secondary/auxiliary"). Also repeatedly talks about "inferior functions" rather than "the inferior function." Does indicate that the opposite of the primary is the least conscious and has opposite attitude, but also implies that all the "inferior functions" have the opposite attitude. Therefore, a strict interpretation would result in an INFP, for example, having "Fi Ne Se Te"

    Pros: The original source. Some real gems and great descriptions of different aspects of type. Lots of information on how psychological types relate to his views on the unconscious, symbols, differentiation, integration, etc.

    Cons: Meandering, spends lots of time on all sorts of obscure, tangentially related topics, doesn't define terms before he uses them, arrogant, etc.

    p. 340, "The superior function is always an expression of the conscious personality, of its aims, will, and general performance, whereas the less differentiated functions fall into the category of things that simply 'happen to one.' These things need not be mere slips of the tongue or pen or other such oversights, they can equally well be half to three-quarters intended, for the less differentiated functions also possess a slight degree of consciousness. A classic example of this is the extraverted feeling type, who enjoys and excellent feeling rapport with people around him, yet occasionally 'happens' to express opinions of unsurpassable tactlessness. These opinions spring from his inferior and half-conscious thinking, which, being only party under his control and insufficiently related to the object, can be quite ruthless in its effects."

    p.406, On secondary/auxiliary function, "Experience shows that the secondary function is always one whose nature is different from, thought not antagonistic to, the primary function. [...] Neither intuition nor sensation is antagonistic to thinking [...] but are functions of perception, affording welcome assistance to thought. [...] Hence the auxiliary function is possible and useful only in so far as it serves the dominant function, without making claim to the autonomy of its own principle. "

    How many functions total for a given type: 4
    How many consciously available: 2 at most
    Other 4 functions: non-existent / not mentioned
    Location of other 4: N/A
    Archetypes emphasized: No (well, technically yes, but not associated with any particular function slot)

    ____________________________________

    Please Understand Me (and Please Understand Me II)
    David Kiersey & Marilyn Bates (just Kiersey for II), Prometheus Nemesis Books, 1984 (originaly 1978), II in 1998

    Summary: Fairly decent basic introduction to the MBTI system and the types. Functions are radically de-emphasized in favor of 4 temperaments (SJ, SP, NT, NF). These leads to a simplified system, but muddies some aspects. Includes descriptions of the 16 types. Includes sections on mating, temperament in children, and temperament and leadership.

    Pros: First generally available, readable book on any kind of Jungian typology system. Explains the MBTI four letter type code, and what each letter means. Introduces the idea of type-associated temperaments. Fairly good description of four basic functions.

    Cons: No explanation of how functions can be extraverted/introverted. This leads to some muddiness in distinguishing types, such as INFPs sounding just like disorganized INFJs. Description of individual types a bit quirky (some as though the author(s) had particular individuals in mind).

    II p 15, Talking about debt to Isabel Myers, "Salvaging the useful part of Jung's cumbersome and self-contradictory theory of psychological types, and making it available to scientist and layman alike was quite a feat."

    How many functions total for a given type: 2 (in so far as functions can be inferred, "functions" never explicitly mentioned)
    How many consciously available: 2 (only mentioned as middle two letters)
    Other 4 functions: non-existent / not mentioned
    Location of other 4: N/A
    Archetypes emphasized: No

    ____________________________________

    Gifts Differing
    Isabel Biggs Myers, Consulting Psychologists Press, 1985 (originally 1980).

    Summary: Basic presentation of MBTI Typology System with type profiles, includes an interesting chapter titled "Extensions to Jung's Theory," which explains where Briggs & Myers extended and modified Jung's theory of types. A definite simplification to having four functions with no explicit distinction between introverted feeling and extraverted feeling, for example. (Note that I don't think this necessarily means Myers & Briggs didn't make distinctions between introverted and extraverted forms of each function, but they sure aren't mentioned in Gifts Differing.) Myers and Briggs created the four letter type codes we use today.

    Also includes overlooked implications of Jung's Theory:
    - Constant Presence of the Auxiliary Process
    - Results of the Combinations of Perception and Judgment
    - Role of the Auxiliary in Balancing Extraversion/Introversion

    Pros: Most direct glimpse (for a non-MBTI-licensed individual) into the original, unmodified MBTI system from one of its creators.

    Cons: Basic in most respects. No introverted/extraverted distinctions for functions.

    p. 17, "Jung's approach [focusing entirely on an unbalanced primary process in his descriptions] has several unfortunate effects. By ignoring the auxiliary, he by-passes the combination of perception and judgment and their broad categories of interest in business, people, language, and science. The result of these combinations -- the everyday forms in which the types are met -- are dismissed in several lines on page 515. [...] Consequently, other researchers, who have reinvented the categories under different names, were unaware of the parallels between their finds and Jung's theories."

    How many functions total for a given type: 4
    How many consciously available: 2 preferred
    Other 4 functions: non-existent / not mentioned (4 function system)
    Location of other 4: N/A
    Archetypes emphasized: No

    ____________________________________

    Works by John Beebe
    "A new model of psychological types," 1988, C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago
    "TYPOLOGY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRITY: An Interview with Dr. John Beebe", In Touch August, 2000
    "An Archetypal Model of the Self in Dialogue,", Theory & Psychology journal, Vol 12, 2002 (offered for a price or subscription)
    "UNDERSTANDING CONSCIOUSNESS THROUGH THE THEORY OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES", Chapter 4, Analytical Psychology: Contemporary Perspectives in Jungian Analysis, Joseph Cambray and Linda Carter (Editors), Hove and New York: Brunner Routledge, 2004, pp. 83-115. (Is like a more detailed and in depth version of "Evolving the 8 Function Model")
    Evolving the Eight-Function Model, by John Beebe, Australian Psychological Type Review, March 2006
    Type and Archetype - Part One , Typeface, Summer 2007
    Type and Archetype - Part Two, Typeface, Autumn 2007
    "A Jungian Analyst Talks About Psychological Types: A Visit with John Beebe", DVD (transcript online here)


    Summary: Lays out Beebe's 8-process model, and the archetypal roles of the functions for the 16 types. Clearly model existed before 2006. Beebe is more of a lecturer than a writer, so it is frustrating more of his material isn't publicly available in lengthier written form.

    Pros: Single most influential modern model. Several articles available online for free.

    Cons: Several relative short documents, have to read through them piecemeal rather than getting a single coherent view.

    Evolving the Eight-Function Model, p. 39, "Jung did, however, open the door to the possibility of a further differentiation of functions, up to a limiting number of four: the fourth to differentiate being his famous 'inferior' function, which remains too close to the unconscious, and thus a source of errors and complexes."

    Evolving the Eight-Function Model, p. 41, "At the time I was too dazzled by the seeming completeness of the four-function model to see that even more delineation was needed to make sense of what Jung had said we could find in ourselves, if his vision of a wholeness of conscious could be realized. Four functions were still only half the story. [...] These four functions [...] continued to express themselves, however, in shadowy ways."

    p. 42, "Although, for convenience of reference and out of respect for the traditional numbering of the functions, I am in the habit of assigning numbers to the function-attitude 'positions' associated with these archetypes, I no longer view the type-profile of an individual as expressing a rigid hierarchy of differentiation of the various functions of consciousness. Rather, I have come to regard [them] [...] in a much more qualitative light."

    Evolving the Eight-Function Model, p. 43, "My hope is that their increasing comfort with a total eight-function, rather than a preferred four-function, model will enable them to begin to recognize the extraordinary role possibility, both for good and for ill, as these consciousnesses differentiate themselves in the course of personal development."

    Type and Archetype, p. 8, "The first observation is that in the course of our lives, we each actually make use of all the function-attitudes, those eight options of consciousness that Jung originally described in Psychological Types: introverted thinking, introverted feeling, introverted sensation, introverted intuition, extraverted thinking, extraverted feeling, extraverted sensation, and extraverted intuition. The second observation is that these function-attitudes, though having typical characteristics that eighty-six years of type research have repeatedly verified, are not expressed in the same way by every individual who deploys them. There is a normal variation not only in the strength and reliability of the functions, according to the degree of preference and practice the individual will bring to the expression of each type of consciousness, but also in the role the individual enters when expressing a particular consciousness."

    A Jungian Analyst Talks About Psychological Types, "'Well, now, you all know about getting your feelings hurt, but some of us who are heavy feeling types, we get our thinkings hurt.'"

    A Jungian Analyst Talks About Psychological Types, "You can find it in two of Jung’s essays. One is a study in the process of individuation, and the other is concerning mandala symbolism, and there somewhere in the text, or in one case even in the footnotes you find this color code, and the color code is red for feeling, blue for thinking, green or brown for sensation, and yellow for intuition"

    How many functions total for a given type: 8
    How many consciously available: 4 (some preferred, of course)
    Other 4 functions: exist, unconsciously active (some squishiness allowed, see quote from p. 42 above)
    Location of other 4: 5-8 (Beebe's model, of course)
    Archetypes emphasized: Yes

    ____________________________________

    Personality Type: An Owner's Manual
    by Lenore Thomson, Shambala, 1998

    Summary: Starting from Beebe's model, Thomson goes on a bit of a departure. Categorizes "left brain," one-at-a-time functions (Te Fe Ni Si) and "right-brained," in-parallel functions (Ti Fi Ne Se). Spends time explaining all 8 functions. Primary and secondary functions generally set the course, but other 6 functions are somewhat available (with tertiary and inferior being the least reliable consciously).

    Pros: Good descriptions of all 8 functions, interesting order, mapping to left/right brain, good type descriptions, addresses tertiary temptation and being in the grip.

    Cons: Left/Right brain mapping not solidly backed by publicly available data, not all case-studies convincing, no experimental/statistical data to back up functional ordering. Star Trek examples become tiresome.

    p. 80 "Logic might suggestion that our inferior function is the one to work on. After all, that's the one that's out of control, right? But concerted efforts to identify with our least-developed point of view never work out the way we think they will. For one thing, we don't really know what we're after. Our inferior function is inferior because its approach to life opposes everything we've tried to be. Making 180-degree turns, even for good reasons, is dangerous business. Instead of raising our least-developed function to consciousness, we can sink our personality to a more unconscious level of operation."

    p.86, "When we develop our dominant function, we learn to block out information from functions that won't support the direction we're taking. These blocked-out functions are the two at the bottom of our type lasagna. The others behave like genes that remain active in a differentiated cell. We use them to support our specialized aims and goals. They don't exert much influence on our choices as such, unless we make a deliberate effort to see life from the perspective they offer."

    p. 87 "Our remaining functions play different roles on the ship, but they operate within the constraints of our dominant course."

    How many functions total for a given type: 8 total
    How many consciously available: 2 highly conscious, then four "other" functions becoming less conscious, with tertiary and inferior as least conscious.
    Other 4 functions: yes, gradually less conscious
    Location of other 4: in the middle, occupying slots 3-6
    Archetypes emphasized: Not explicitly

    ____________________________________

    Dynamics of Personality Type
    by Linda V. Berens, Telos Publications, 1999

    Summary: A booklet that presents the cognitive functions in an approachable way. Berens also mentioned "interaction styles" (which she covers in more depth in her [i]An Introduction to Interaction Styles[i]). Berens also has some other booklets covering other type topics in a similar style and format. Covers the basics of all 8 functions and is a good place to start exploration of the 8-process model, assuming you can take the "business-friendly" presentation.

    Pros: This booklet presents the cognitive functions in a friendly, breezy, graphical, business-friendly format.

    Cons: This booklet presents the cognitive functions in a friendly, breezy, graphical, business-friendly format.

    p. 8, "We can use all eight cognitive processes, yet we have preferences or natural inclinations for some of them. We are naturally inclined to use these eight processes in a pattern."


    How many functions total for a given type: 8
    How many consciously available: all 8 (with preferences, of course)
    Other 4 functions: consciously available
    Location of other 4: slots 5-8 (Beebe's ordering)
    Archetypes emphasized: No

    ____________________________________

    Was That Really Me?
    by Naomi L. Quenk, Davies-Black, 2002

    Summary: Mostly concerned with being "in the grip" of the inferior function, and how the secondary function is almost always the way out. Also emphasizes how the tertiary usually backs the primary under stress in an unhealthy way.

    Pros: Good emphasis on the secondary process being the way out, lots of "case-study"-ish examples.

    Cons: Case-studies aren't always convincing.

    p. 40, "You will recall that Jung-Myers approach specifies that we are free to use each of the four functions -- S, N, T, and F -- in both the attitudes of Extraversion and Introversion at least some of the time. Such flows of energy are necessary for good adaptation in an active, dynamic psychological system. [...] Nevertheless, because attitude determines the sphere in which a function operates [...] when we use a function in the less-preferred attitude we find ourselves in a foreign land, full of uncertainty of lacking in confidence. We fell and behave differently and may appear different to others. This is especially true when the function in question is a dominant one."

    How many functions total for a given type: 8
    How many consciously available: 8 (some preferred, of course)
    Other 4 functions: exist, consciously available
    Location of other 4: 5-8 (Beebe's model, not explicitly listed but implied)
    Archetypes emphasized: No

    ____________________________________

    Building Blocks of Personality Type
    Leona Haas & Mark Hunziker, Unite Business Press, 2006

    p. 6, "Everyone possess the potential to use all eight of the mental processes. We each access and engage them in ways that are, to a great extent, universal and predictable, create the sixteen innate and balanced sequences that define the sixteen types."

    Building Blocks of Personality Type, Leona Haas & Mark Hunziker, 2006, p. xxii, "As early as 1974, Dr. Beebe developed the idea that the first four functions alternate attitudes like a series of checks and balances, with the third being in the same attitude as the first. [...] By 1985, he had begun exploring the concept that each individual has access to all eight of the processes."

    How many functions total for a given type: 8
    How many consciously available: 8 (some preferred, of course)
    Other 4 functions: exist, consciously available
    Location of other 4: 5-8 (Beebe's model)
    Archetypes emphasized: No
    ____________________________________

    Functions of Type
    by Gary Hartzler & Margaret Hartzler, Telos Publications, 2005

    Summary: Much like 8 Keys to Self Leadership below, mostly offers descriptions of the 8 cognitive processes, and perspectives and exercises to develop each.

    Pros: Provides descriptions of each cognitive process, along with perspectives and exercises to develop each. References actual research for variant cognitive process ordering.

    Cons: Its narrow focus doesn't provide much else. Fine for what it addresses.

    p. 6, "Type development involves developing skills relative to the eight psychological functions. [...] The development of the other six functions is not so clear. Two patterns are emerging from our research: The same functions as the dominant and auxiliary in the opposite attitudes are the third and fourth most developed. [...] The only ordering that appears in the bottom four is that frequently the inferior function is last, that is, if the dominant is Fe than Ti would be the least developed. [...] Remember that there are frequent variations in the last four functions, so the fifth could be the seventh or the seventh could be the sixth. What is constant is that the bottom four functions are seen as being less developed than the top four."

    Note, Hartzler & Hartzler make some minor changes to Beebe's ordering. For example, ESFJ would be Fe, Si, Fi, Se, Ne, Ni, Ti, Te, with the first two being dominant, auxiliary, then 5th being tertiary, 8th inferior). Note that their listing follows Beebe's ordering, although the text is as above, and is not reflected in their listing of Beebe's ordering.

    How many functions total for a given type: 8
    How many consciously available: 8 (some preferred, of course)
    Other 4 functions: exist, consciously available
    Location of other 4: 3-4, 6-7 (with tertiary slot 5, inferior 8th, bottom 4 variable)
    Archetypes emphasized: No

    ____________________________________

    8 Keys to Self-Leadership
    by Dario Nardi, Unite Business Press, 2005

    Summary: Much like Functions of Type above, mostly offers descriptions of the 8 cognitive processes, and perspectives and exercises to develop each.

    Pros: Provides descriptions of each cognitive process, along with perspectives and exercises to develop each. Separates preference from skill (skill can be developed for any cognitive process, regardless of preference)

    Cons: It's narrow focus doesn't provide much else. Fine for what it addresses.

    p. 5, "We can each use each of the four basic processes in either the external world (extraverting) or the internal world (introverting). Thus we use a total of eight processes."

    p. 10, "Finally, consider exploring and developing all eight [cognitive processes] to include them in your life in some way."

    How many functions available for a given type: 8
    How many consciously available: 2 primarily preferred... up to 8
    Other 4 functions: Available consciously, but not preferred
    Location of other 4: ranks 5-8 (not explicitly listed)
    Archetypes emphasized: No

    ____________________________________

    Principles of Typology
    by Aleksey Bashtavenko, 2008

    Summary: Hews very closely to Jung (more closely than Myers & Briggs, in some ways), does admit the existence of 4 other functions for a given type, but they are described as "dormant".

    Pros: Fairly "advanced" book, very organized, rigorous Ti-based presentation, long type descriptions for each type talking about the roles of 4 functions for each type. Interesting take on things, not just covering the same ground over again. Also includes brief critiques of Thomson and Kiersey.

    Cons: Slightly arrogant tone, some typos, not a native English speaker (I'm guessing), can be dismissive of other approaches.

    p 21-22, "We are accustomed to the notion of a dominant function, secondary, tertiary, and inferior. Yet, one is tempted to ask, what about all others? [...] all 8 faculties are inhere within our psyche. Yet only four are active, the remaining four dormant."

    How many functions available for a given type: 4
    How many consciously available: 2-4
    Other 4 functions: Dormant
    Location of other 4: ranks 5-8 (at bottom)
    Archetypes emphasized: No

    ____________________________________

    Finally, here's a horrifically simplified "family tree" of typology books. Note I pretty much am listing the 8 function books in order. I put Thomson slightly off to the right because she has some quirky differences. I'm sure others could be adjusted left-or-right with some meaning (more Jungian vs. more quirky), but this is a first pass.

    So let me know if you have changes you want here, as well.


    Last edited by Seymour; 02-02-2010 at 10:08 PM.

  2. #2
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    I would put all of Beebe's available articles together to count as one "book". You really need all of them to get a clearer picture of how his model works:

    http://www.ccc-apt.org/system/files/...+The+Spine.pdf
    http://www.ccc-apt.org/system/files/...+The+Arms+.pdf

    Some other informative articles:
    "TYPOLOGY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRITY: An Interview with Dr. John Beebe", In Touch August, 2000 http://www.centerpointec.com/files/t...evelopment.pdf

    "A Jungian Analyst Talks About Psychological Types: A Visit with John Beebe" - DVD (transcript online at A Jungian Analyst Talks about Psychological Types)

    He introduced his model in "A new model of psychological types" (1988), C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago.

    One extensive printed article by Beebe is "An Archetypal Model of the Self in Dialogue" in the Theory & Psychology journal, offered for a price or subscription, at: An Archetypal Model of the Self in Dialogue -- Beebe 12 (2): 267 -- Theory & Psychology. He even analyzes Woody Allen's movie Husbands and Wives in light of the archetypes.

    "UNDERSTANDING CONSCIOUSNESS THROUGH THE THEORY OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES", Chapter 4, Analytical Psychology: Contemporary Perspectives in Jungian Analysis, Joseph Cambray and Linda Carter (Editors), Hove and New York: Brunner Routledge, 2004, pp. 83-115. is like a more detailed and in depth version of "Evolving the 8 Function Model"
    APS Profile: Inclusion: e/w=1/6 (Supine) |Control: e/w=7/3 (Choleric) |Affection: e/w=1/9 (Supine)
    Ti 54.3 | Ne 47.3 | Si 37.8 | Fe 17.7 | Te 22.5 | Ni 13.4 | Se 18.9 | Fi 27.9

    Temperament (APS) from scratch -- MBTI Type from scratch
    Type Ideas

  3. #3
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric B View Post
    I would put all of Beebe's available articles together to count as one "book". You really need all of them to get a clearer picture of how his model works:

    http://www.ccc-apt.org/system/files/...+The+Spine.pdf
    http://www.ccc-apt.org/system/files/...+The+Arms+.pdf

    Some other informative articles:
    "TYPOLOGY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRITY: An Interview with Dr. John Beebe", In Touch August, 2000 http://www.centerpointec.com/files/t...evelopment.pdf

    "A Jungian Analyst Talks About Psychological Types: A Visit with John Beebe" - DVD (transcript online at A Jungian Analyst Talks about Psychological Types)

    He introduced his model in "A new model of psychological types" (1988), C.G. Jung Institute of Chicago.

    One extensive printed article by Beebe is "An Archetypal Model of the Self in Dialogue" in the Theory & Psychology journal, offered for a price or subscription, at: An Archetypal Model of the Self in Dialogue -- Beebe 12 (2): 267 -- Theory & Psychology. He even analyzes Woody Allen's movie Husbands and Wives in light of the archetypes.

    "UNDERSTANDING CONSCIOUSNESS THROUGH THE THEORY OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES", Chapter 4, Analytical Psychology: Contemporary Perspectives in Jungian Analysis, Joseph Cambray and Linda Carter (Editors), Hove and New York: Brunner Routledge, 2004, pp. 83-115. is like a more detailed and in depth version of "Evolving the 8 Function Model"
    Nice! Thanks so much! I'll try to add those in, read through them and adjust appropriately.

  4. #4
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    Okay, I'm really tired of being corrected by people who think there is only one true type model, and that every expert is in perfect agreement.
    Then you'll be dead from exhaustion not so long from now.


    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    Pros:... ...Lots of information on how psychological types relate to his views on the unconscious, symbols, differentiation, integration, etc.

    Cons: Meandering, spends lots of time on all sorts of obscure, tangentially related topics, doesn't define terms before he uses them, arrogant, etc.
    It's funny how that could have been basically anything written by Jung.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


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  5. #5
    You have a choice! 21%'s Avatar
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    Oooooh, thank you so much for this! I've been looking for something like this forever. I especially like how you give the pros and cons for each book Very, very helpful!

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    Good work overall!

    I'm hesitant to mention Socionics, but it's also derived from Jung's work as perhaps a second branch from him. I can give it a writeup if you're interested, or someone else who's more knowledgeable can give it a go..

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    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    This is one of the most useful, non-redundant threads I've seen in quite some time. It's very nicely laid out, too: your chart and the check lists at the end of each description make your post, which could have been a long-winded wall of text, very easy to read.

    5 stars.
    Type: INFP Enneagram: 4
    Fi>Si>Ne>Te>Fe>Se>Ti>Ni

    ¡cataplum!

  8. #8
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
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    Thanks for the positive feedback! It's nice to feel this could be useful to others.

    Quote Originally Posted by greed View Post
    I'm hesitant to mention Socionics, but it's also derived from Jung's work as perhaps a second branch from him. I can give it a writeup if you're interested, or someone else who's more knowledgeable can give it a go..
    No need to hesitate... I would be appreciative of that! I don't have the energy to give socionics thorough survey any time soon. Also, if you'd let me know where you'd recommend putting it on the horrifically oversimplified typology family tree, I'd be happy to add it there, too.

    Maybe a separate, longer post on how socionics differs from the MBTI would be good, too? There might be one of those around here, already, but having an overview of how it's different along with the overview of the various models might be useful for un-confusing people (or at least confusing them differently).


    And again, I'm happy to adjust summaries and pros and cons, etc, too. I intend to eventually review everything again to make sure I wasn't being unfair, since I was going by memory plus a refresher skim in some cases.

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    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    You forgot the ultimate, Aushra Augustinavichiute - The Dual Nature of Man
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  10. #10
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greed View Post
    Good work overall!

    I'm hesitant to mention Socionics, but it's also derived from Jung's work as perhaps a second branch from him. I can give it a writeup if you're interested, or someone else who's more knowledgeable can give it a go..
    Socionics has more in common with the MBTI than the temperament model does if you ask me.

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    You forgot the ultimate, Aushra Augustinavichiute - The Dual Nature of Man
    Ausra was the founder of Socionics, and they were already kind of touching on how that hasn't been included here.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


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