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  1. #1
    Uniqueorn William K's Avatar
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    Default Is it better to be well-rounded in function use?

    From some of the posts made in the Fi, Ti and INxP threads, it seems to me that being a strong user of a certain function by itself is neither good or bad since it mainly indicates preference, not skill in applying the said function.

    Please be patient now as I try to make an analogy

    Let's say there is a tennis player who is naturally tall and has a strong right arm. As such, he has a powerful serve. Now, if he just works on his serve and puts it into play a high percentage of the time, he's going to win a lot of points and matches. He might be too one-dimensional to be world number one or win Grand Slams, but he will still be a good tennis player. Yes, he could work on other portions of his game like groundstrokes and volleying, but his serve will still be the main weapon that he depends on.

    Now let's take another player who is not tall and not as strong, but has great foot speed and court coverage. Again, he can work on his serve of course but he will never be as good as the big serve-dom Would you expect the coach to tell him to stop trying to run around but instead to go hit the gym and build up his arm strength?

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that, while it might be optimal to be an all-round player, not everyone can be a Federer or Nadal. Is working on your strengths a better way to success than trying to improve your weaknesses? If you could only choose one, which would it be? Not really looking for a definite answer, but would love to hear others' thoughts.
    4w5, Fi>Ne>Ti>Si>Ni>Fe>Te>Se, sp > so > sx

    appreciates being appreciated, conflicted over conflicts, afraid of being afraid, bad at being bad, predictably unpredictable, consistently inconsistent, remarkably unremarkable...

    I may not agree with what you are feeling, but I will defend to death your right to have a good cry over it

    The whole problem with the world is that fools & fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell

  2. #2
    Geolectric teslashock's Avatar
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    If you have already established a particular skill and have strengthened it to reach its maximum potential, why would you not move on to a new skill? The ability to adapt and solve challenges is one the most important things in life, and you cannot possibly solve every single challenge from the same approach.

    What happens when your tennis player faces an opponent who can return his serves? His weapon essentially becomes nullified. If the tennis player had worked more on his backhand, spiking, and footing, he'd be more likely to win the game. If you have a particular natural talent, there's nothing wrong with working on it in order to enhance it, but that shouldn't be the end-all be-all. You never know what other skillsets will aid in your original natural talent or just open completely new doors for you.

    Most of the people with personalities that are hard to deal with are seriuosly unbalanced in terms of function use.

    Introverted judging functions are headstrong and unyielding when they are not balanced by some perceiving function or some Je.

    Strong extroverted judging functions can cause one to completely lack an internal value system, so Je needs some serious balance with Ji to make them a bit more ethical or reasonable. Otherwise you're left with a person who has hardly any real "self."

    Strong extroverted perceiving functions can cause one to be too impulsive and disorganized and require some sort of introverted function for more grounding and analysis.

    Strong introverted perceiving functions can make one totally detached from society, resulting in aloofness and apathy. They also require some sort of extroverted function to help them better interact with the world.

    Balance is key, as you can't expect the people around you to always be in tune with your strongest function. It's important to be able to adapt and use other functions, so you can communicate with others and interact with the world effectively.

  3. #3
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Balance is boring. There are pros and cons to it, but I think the people who indulge in their strengths, rather than try to compensate for their weaknesses, do better in life.

    If Einstein had a more well-rounded and balanced Ti we might not have had E=mc2.... etc. etc...

  4. #4
    Geolectric teslashock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    Balance is boring. There are pros and cons to it, but I think the people who indulge in their strengths, rather than try to compensate for their weaknesses, do better in life.

    If Einstein had a more well-rounded and balanced Ti we might not have had E=mc2.... etc. etc...
    Actually Einstein's Ti was very well-balanced by his Ne. He was practically an xNTP, as his Ti/Ne were perfectly complementary. If there were no balancing act in his cognitive pathways, his theory of relativity would have been permanently halted by applying Ti-overanalysis to the roadblock he reached in attempting to define "light" (a definition he never really settled on, btw, and just decided to treat with more of an inconclusive "intuitive hunch" approach).

  5. #5
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    I think balance means developing your weaker areas, but accepting that your natural strengths will always take the lead (not forcing yourself to be something you're not). That doesn't mean writing off your flaws and not seeing a need for self-improvement.

    Sometimes I see my 4 functions like a traditional family. Fi is the dad (or mom) and wears the pants & makes the decisions, Ne is the supporting spouse (defers to Fi), Si is the big sis, and Te is the little bratty brother. Even as Si and Te grow up, they still aren't the dad and mom of the family. In order to have harmony in the family, Fi and Ne need to maintain their authority, as they will always have the advantage of being more mature. Most likely, Si and Te will never grow up fully & will always be dependent, but Fi and Ne still need to reach a level of maturity & harmony with each other to keep them in check and to take the lead.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  6. #6
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teslashock View Post
    Actually Einstein's Ti was very well-balanced by his Ne. He was practically an xNTP, as his Ti/Ne were perfectly complementary. If there were no balancing act in his cognitive pathways, his theory of relativity would have been permanently halted by applying Ti-overanalysis to the roadblock he reached in attempting to define "light" (a definition he never really settled on, btw, and just decided to treat with more of an inconclusive "intuitive hunch" approach).
    Practically xNTP?? wtf, better not try to make a grab for Einstein, he's ours!

    Introverted thinking, which he had to totally delve into just as an entry requirement for the type of work he was doing, was much more central. Along with good aux Ne use.

  7. #7
    Geolectric teslashock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    I think balance means developing your weaker areas, but accepting that your natural strengths will always take the lead (not forcing yourself to be something you're not). That doesn't mean writing off your flaws and not seeing a need for self-improvement.
    Agreed. Well-said.

    Sometimes I see my 4 functions like a traditional family. Fi is the dad (or mom) and wears the pants & makes the decisions, Ne is the supporting spouse (defers to Fi), Si is the big sis, and Te is the little bratty brother. Even as Si and Te grow up, they still aren't the dad and mom of the family. In order to have harmony in the family, Fi and Ne need to maintain their authority, as they will always have the advantage of being more mature. Most likely, Si and Te will never grow up fully & will always be dependent, but Fi and Ne still need to reach a level of maturity & harmony with each other to keep them in check and to take the lead.
    This is a great analogy. You're cool when you use Ne

    Just don't forget that as the kids grow up, the parents may learn something from the process of raising them or simply from their children surpassing them in certain arenas.

  8. #8
    Geolectric teslashock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    Practically xNTP?? wtf, better not try to make a grab for Einstein, he's ours!

    Introverted thinking, which he had to totally delve into just as an entry requirement for the type of work he was doing, was much more central. Along with good aux Ne use.
    Aka balance.

    I'm not trying to stake a claim on Einstein; don't worry. He was definitely an INTP in terms of an MBTI personality categorization, and I bet Ti came a lot more naturally for him. However, his Ne and Ti were just so well balanced that it's hard to even say which one was always dominant in the area of his scientific work. His accomplishments reek of Ne-filtered Ti as well as Ti-filtered Ne.

  9. #9
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teslashock View Post
    Aka balance.

    I'm not trying to stake a claim on Einstein; don't worry. He was definitely an INTP in terms of an MBTI personality categorization, and I bet Ti came a lot more natural to him. However, his Ne and Ti were just so well balanced that it's hard to even say which one was always dominant in the area of his scientific work. His accomplishments reek of Ne-filtered Ti as well as Ti-filtered Ne.
    Well, his Fe was notoriously weak. And he was a complete sensotard. Intensely introverted.

    If you just rely on Ti to the extreme and then Ne, and everything else is weak or not used, that's unbalanced.

  10. #10
    Uniqueorn William K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by teslashock View Post
    If you have already established a particular skill and have strengthened it to reach its maximum potential, why would you not move on to a new skill? The ability to adapt and solve challenges is one the most important things in life, and you cannot possibly solve every single challenge from the same approach.
    If one has reached its maximum potential then I agree, but I believe that we are always learning and developing ourselves. Is the effort of being good at another skill that the person is not naturally adapt in worth it, especially if it means sacrificing time/effort to work on his/her strengths? I'm all for being adaptable and having multiple tools you can use to complement your strength, but if you take twice or X amount of time and effort on improving speed vs strength...
    4w5, Fi>Ne>Ti>Si>Ni>Fe>Te>Se, sp > so > sx

    appreciates being appreciated, conflicted over conflicts, afraid of being afraid, bad at being bad, predictably unpredictable, consistently inconsistent, remarkably unremarkable...

    I may not agree with what you are feeling, but I will defend to death your right to have a good cry over it

    The whole problem with the world is that fools & fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell

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