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  1. #1
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
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    Default The REAL differences between introversion and extroversion

    Ok, I know there are many topics on this, but none of them have cleared up my doubts. I've read a few different interpretations of intro vs. extroversion, from social anxiety to living in your own mind vs. gregariousness and meeting new people, but the distinctions all seem varying. So in terms of MBTI (although I know a lot about I vs. E), I want to know what you guys think is the main differences between introversion and extroversion.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    I think only the person that come up with the terms could REALLY answer the question but the way I see it, Es are dependent on outside input and Is on inside output.


    Was that vague enough?

  3. #3
    Glycerine
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    This is what sealed ENFJ for me. I can't remember the resource though.


    Extroversion and introversion fundamentally involves (1) where someone gets energy and (2) how that person processes information.

    ****EXTROVERTS****
    Extroverts get energy from being around people in unstructured settings. Often, simply being in the same room with other people energizes them. They are drained when being isolated or in an environment with incredibly structured interpersonal relationships. Often extroverts in these situations will find themselves picking at food, making random phone calls, or getting up and walking the halls in an attempt to re-energize themselves.

    When it comes to processing information, it’s been said that if extroverts aren’t talking, they aren’t thinking. That isn’t too far from the truth. Extroverts are verbal processors—they talk about their ideas, tweak them as they talk, and then figure out what they’re thinking. This can be confusing for others because it can look like extroverts are forever changing their mind. Often an idea isn’t “real” until an extrovert has been able to brainstorm about it with other people. For them, interacting with people IS a worthy objective and a concrete task.


    ****INTROVERTS****
    Introverts, on the other hand, tend to get energy from being alone or working with people in very structured ways. This does NOT mean they are socially inept. It simply means interacting with people for extended periods of time, especially in unstructured settings, will usually drain them. They’ll often need to go to lunch alone or close their office door to re-energize.

    When introverts process information, they do the processing internally. They’ll mull over an idea by themselves, polishing it, making it just right. THEN, they’ll be ready to share it with others. When they finally do verbalize their idea, it’s a finished product.

  4. #4
    Senior Member VagrantFarce's Avatar
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    I always thought this was a clear distinction:

    introverted tend to think before doing, whereas extroverts do before thinking. This isn't set in stone and the behaviour can change depending on the functions that are active, but it seems fairly clear to me.

    [edit] if you're having trouble with your type, don't look at it in terms of the letter dichotomy; that's for newbies. Look at the behaviour of each function and consider which tend to line up with your behaviour.

  5. #5
    That chalkboard guy Matthew_Z's Avatar
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    I believe there was a study somewhere about a link between Cerebral Blood Flow (the blood in your brain) and introversion/extraversion. Essentially, More blood to the part of your brain(namely, the frontal lobes) known for introverted characteristics and you become an introvert. Naturally, this would imply a continuum of introversion/extraversion. It also implies that any given individual has the characteristics of both an introvert and extravert, but some of these characteristics are inherently preferred over others.

    -skip long speech about the relation between the frontal lobes and "executive functions" (not in the MBTI sense of the word) that don't require as much external stimulus-
    If a deaf INFP falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Pitseleh. Wow, that is amazing about the extroverts and their thinking.
    I thought i was just awkward/contradictory as my views on something can change a few days later. It makes sense now.

    Thank you.

    (sorry to derail)
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

  7. #7
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew_Z View Post
    I believe there was a study somewhere about a link between Cerebral Blood Flow (the blood in your brain) and introversion/extraversion. Essentially, More blood to the part of your brain(namely, the frontal lobes) known for introverted characteristics and you become an introvert. Naturally, this would imply a continuum of introversion/extraversion. It also implies that any given individual has the characteristics of both an introvert and extravert, but some of these characteristics are inherently preferred over others.
    Yeah, I just want something to shut up people who say you can't be an ambivert (in theory)

  8. #8

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    Psychological Types, Carl Jung

    The introvert is distinguished from the extrovert by the fact that he does not, like the latter, orient himself by the object and by the objective data, but by subjective factors.
    Thus, just as it seems incomprehensible to the introvert that the object should always be the decisive factor, it remains an enigma to the extravert how a subjective standpoint can be superior to the objective situation. He inevitably comes to the conclusion that the introvert is either a conceited egoist or crack-brained bigot.
    The undervaluation of his own principle makes the introvert egotistical and forces on him the psychology of the underdog. The more egotistical he becomes, the more it seems to him that the others, who are apparently able, without qualms, to conform to the general style, are the oppressors against whom he must defend himself.
    His fear of objects develops into a peculiar kind of cowardliness; he shrinks from making himself or his opinions felt, fearing that this will only increase the object's power... His ideal is a lonely island where nothing moves except what he permits to move.

  9. #9
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pitseleh View Post
    This is what sealed ENFJ for me. I can't remember the resource though.


    Extroversion and introversion fundamentally involves (1) where someone gets energy and (2) how that person processes information.

    ****EXTROVERTS****
    Extroverts get energy from being around people in unstructured settings. Often, simply being in the same room with other people energizes them. They are drained when being isolated or in an environment with incredibly structured interpersonal relationships. Often extroverts in these situations will find themselves picking at food, making random phone calls, or getting up and walking the halls in an attempt to re-energize themselves.

    When it comes to processing information, it’s been said that if extroverts aren’t talking, they aren’t thinking. That isn’t too far from the truth. Extroverts are verbal processors—they talk about their ideas, tweak them as they talk, and then figure out what they’re thinking. This can be confusing for others because it can look like extroverts are forever changing their mind. Often an idea isn’t “real” until an extrovert has been able to brainstorm about it with other people. For them, interacting with people IS a worthy objective and a concrete task.


    ****INTROVERTS****
    Introverts, on the other hand, tend to get energy from being alone or working with people in very structured ways. This does NOT mean they are socially inept. It simply means interacting with people for extended periods of time, especially in unstructured settings, will usually drain them. They’ll often need to go to lunch alone or close their office door to re-energize.

    When introverts process information, they do the processing internally. They’ll mull over an idea by themselves, polishing it, making it just right. THEN, they’ll be ready to share it with others. When they finally do verbalize their idea, it’s a finished product.
    Yeah, see when you put it that way, I'm more introverted.


    Quote Originally Posted by VagrantFarce View Post
    I always thought this was a clear distinction:

    introverted tend to think before doing, whereas extroverts do before thinking. This isn't set in stone and the behaviour can change depending on the functions that are active, but it seems fairly clear to me.

    [edit] if you're having trouble with your type, don't look at it in terms of the letter dichotomy; that's for newbies. Look at the behaviour of each function and consider which tend to line up with your behaviour.
    Yeah, my Si is usually highest. Fi is far higher than Ne, which is almost non-existent. That leans more toward ISTJ.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    I think only the person that come up with the terms could REALLY answer the question but the way I see it, Es are dependent on outside input and Is on inside output.


    Was that vague enough?
    Quite vague, lol.


    The introvert is distinguished from the extrovert by the fact that he does not, like the latter, orient himself by the object and by the objective data, but by subjective factors.
    This doesn't sound like me at all. If an introvert views an outside object subjectively and an extrovert views it objectively, then I'm the latter.

    The undervaluation of his own principle makes the introvert egotistical and forces on him the psychology of the underdog. The more egotistical he becomes, the more it seems to him that the others, who are apparently able, without qualms, to conform to the general style, are the oppressors against whom he must defend himself.
    This applies to me, however.

  10. #10

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    So the confusion stems from Sensing = external factors?

    Someone's already suggested on here (forgot where) that I/E shouldn't have been linked to S/N, F/T in the first place. I dunno.

    My best bet would be: Introverted. J=Thinking, P=Sensing.

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