User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 35

  1. #1
    Senior Member KarenParker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    ESFP
    Enneagram
    7
    Socionics
    ESFj
    Posts
    319

    Default INTJs given an unfair advantage in public schools?

    I was thinking today about what personality type would do the best in school and I had this idea that INTJ would do the best because the teaching system is slanted towards that. Think about it, introverts who can easily understand abstraction and theory who will diligently spend time outside of class working on their homework which will probably include an abstract essay or reading of theory.

    I lived with an INTJ for 6 years and we both went to college. He seemed to be able to do the same work as me with ease in about half the time, while I was pulling my hair out trying to get through it all. So that got me thinking about something else, do you supposed that if you conducted a survey, that you would find ESFPs do the worst in school and INTJs do the best? And what would a school system look like that was advantageous to an ESFP? For example, I imagine economics would be taught showing movies about historical examples of human events. Maybe hands on activities with human interaction would be used. I went to elementary school in the montessori system. Maybe that system is more suited to an ESFP.
    E - 79% I - 21%
    S - 53% N - 47%
    T - 32% F - 68%
    J - 32% P - 68%

    ESFP


  2. #2
    half mystic, half skeksis jenocyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Socionics
    ENTp
    Posts
    6,387

    Default

    I thought there was a huge thread about schools being geared toward SJs... a fact which seems more plausible to me.

  3. #3
    Badoom~ Skyward's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    infj
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Posts
    1,087

    Default

    I think it really depends on the school system and what is required curriculum, but mostly, I think it would be more of an SJ thing, especially ISJs. IT really depends on how the teacher teaches and how the teacher views their career and the students' willingness to learn, not type.
    'Imperfection is beauty, madness is genius and its better to be absolutely ridiculous than absolutely boring.' - Marilyn Monroe

    This is who I am, escapist, paradise-seeker.
    -Nightwish

    Anthropology Major out of Hamline University. St. Paul, Minnesota.

  4. #4
    resonance entropie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    entp
    Enneagram
    783
    Posts
    16,761

    Default

    Well I got beat up in like every class for my ability to abstract. Our school system can be quite boring for intuitive types, leading to the fact that they suck at school. But you can hardly have it any other way, if you want everyone to pass the final exams.

    That'ld be like peeing on your own rug
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  5. #5
    half mystic, half skeksis jenocyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w8
    Socionics
    ENTp
    Posts
    6,387

    Default

    why is it like peeing on your own rug, lol???

  6. #6
    Member Eowyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESfP
    Enneagram
    2
    Socionics
    ESFP
    Posts
    93

    Default

    My husband is an INTJ, and he is a public school teacher. This does not surprise me. However, I will say that he has clear interest in teaching his students in the way they best learn, although he does have a hard time understanding *why* a particular learning style may work for them.
    "Every well-bred petty crook knows -- the small concealable weapons always go to the far left of the place setting."
    -Inara Serra

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    669

    Default

    My INTJ friend is a billion times smarter than me, but I've done way better in school than he did/does, even though I'm a horrible procrastinator and I have to be in the right mood to study certain subjects. The INTJ's learning capacity has always been so far above what he was being taught in school that he was bored out of his mind. He dropped out of college later for the same reason, and is now trying again at another school.

    I also have two ESFP friends whose grades were at the top of their classes. Neither of them really liked school, but they had the determination and diligence to do what needed to be done.

    I agree with Skyward that it depends on the curriculum, the teaching style, and the individual students.
    I-71%, N-80%, F-74%, P-96%

  8. #8
    That chalkboard guy Matthew_Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    xxxx
    Posts
    1,256

    Default

    The answer to the question "Which type is school geared towards?" would depend largely on how "success" in school is gauged. (and, as mentioned, the curriculum and teaching style) If an INTJ gauges success based on how well they understand the curriculum or by the grades they receive, then it could be said that they succeeded. (assuming both of these goals were achieved, of course)

    However, if a rather social extrovert gauged their success based on how likable they were considered to be by staff, faculty, and the student body it could also be said that they succeeded. (provided, of course, that they were considered likable)
    If a deaf INFP falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

  9. #9
    garbage
    Guest

    Default

    Learn how to use your "disadvantages" to your own "unfair advantage."

    That, or find an educational path that plays to your strengths.

  10. #10
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    3,377

    Default

    If you are talking about the classroom, then the teaching style of the teacher can have a big effect on the students' ability to learn. However I would agree that textbooks are written with INTJ's in mind. That is, I would think a course without an instructor (like an online course) would be easiest for an INTJ compared to other types.

    On the other hand I think most curricula tend to marginalize SP's. SP's tend to favor a hands on learning style which most curricula ignore.
    My wife and I made a game to teach kids about nutrition. Please try our game and vote for us to win. (Voting period: July 14 - August 14)
    http://www.revoltingvegetables.com

Similar Threads

  1. Description of an estp girl in high school?
    By user24 in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-29-2016, 05:17 PM
  2. [ISFP] How to make an ISFP fall in L-O-V-E
    By CzeCze in forum The SP Arthouse (ESFP, ISFP, ESTP, ISTP)
    Replies: 63
    Last Post: 06-20-2014, 03:31 PM
  3. [INTJ] INTx, how did you act in high school?
    By Illmatic in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 10-02-2011, 06:02 AM
  4. [INTJ] The INTJ nature on forums (and in life?)
    By gandalf in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 07-27-2011, 12:14 AM
  5. [INTJ] INTJs in public places
    By Kalach in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 04-06-2009, 10:29 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO