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Thread: reflection

  1. #91
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    nightning, I do not have a background in music. And I have a limited appreciation of classical music. I cannot understand why some pieces are beautiful - like you said, its always a mass to me, taken as a whole, or a slice of patterns within the whole.

    Had always put my lack of taste to not knowing the language.

    I dissected. But that's not how I like them done. It led on from wildcat's point. Which I do not understand. It was a stab in the dark.

  2. #92
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
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    My knowledge of history and theories in music is not much better. Had no patience for it you see. I'm just describing what it felt like to me.

    Back on topic! Music as flow? Love and to some essence life in general is about placing trust in the flow and letting go?

    Mr. wildcat?
    Where are you at?
    Mouse knows you're lurking...
    Upon the bank, chuckling.

  3. #93
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dane View Post
    Impatience is one my faults, yes.

    I do not know music intimately. But there are compositions where silence does not come in between the sounds at all. One note, then another, until the end - a certain amount of silence.

    Possibilities of note, but which is the note. For now, for the whole.
    Is that how it is meant to be seen? Why this note than that - notes, time, economy of choices, all together in a cadence, a tattoo - and how does it come across, overall? A tapestry, one thread at a time.

    For other music, yes, silence is just another note.

    How then can true music be exclusive to those with silence between sounds?

    But that was not what I asked the last time.
    The silence of sounds.
    What is it?
    It is the silence between the sounds.
    The Sound of Silence. Paul Simon.

    Poetry. Oratory. Music.

    How did the grand masters of oratory come to be?
    They found the silence between the words. It is that simple.
    Great discoveries are always simple.

    What are the compositions where silence has no room between the sounds I do not know.
    Do you know a good composition like that? Where is it?
    I have not found one specimen, ever.

    When I was three years old I fell in love with the Wich's Apprentice. P.D.
    Because of the sounds of silence he used so magnificiently.

    In 1964 I heard Winston Churchill speak on the radio. He was an old man by then.
    One of the greatest orators of all times.
    They say Mark Anthony was a great orator. We have only the Shakespeare interpretation of him. And the interpretation of the Shakespeare Anthony by some of the best actors of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

    What makes a good actor? A good speech.
    And who makes the good speech?
    He who masters the silence ( - ..) between the sounds.. the intuitive knowledge where to place them, how long or short they should be.
    Not different in essence from the ability of a musician. Or the song writer.

    day .. o
    day.. ay.. ay.. o
    walk.. all-night.. on-a-drink-of.. rum
    stuck.. banana.. till-the-mornin' ... come

  4. #94
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    Without having any very strong background in music either, my take on this is that the silences (the rests) denote the rhythm of the music, or where a phrase starts and ends. It's very much like the punctuation in the written speech, which, as wildcat said, in the oral speech is transformed to pauses between words and change at the intonation of the speaker.
    I'd say that music is the notes, as speech is the words, but you need the silence (rests, pauses) in order to structure your music or speech. Without at least a minimal structure, one is at risk of being incomprehensible.

  5. #95
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightning View Post
    *scratches head* Mouse would like some clarification as well... or at least some discussion.

    To me, music is not in the notes. Nor is it in the silence. Rather it lies in the patterns within the notes (sounds). Therefore music cannot be dissected, pulled apart for bit by bit analysis. I guess that's why I dislike the conventional way of piano teaching. To me, the piece of music is a whole. You can have sections... but in the end you have to put everything together in order to understand the meaning. Because everything matters. The ornaments aren't just ornaments for decoration... they provide the needed complexity.
    I think that is why it is important you leave the first and even the second piano teacher before you attain to his level. Otherwise he stifles you.

    All the great pianists left their first piano teacher early. Arthur Rubinstein had one of the best teachers in his time. There were tears, yes. But.. had he not left, would he have become Arthur Rubinstein? The Arthur Rubinstein...?

    Intuition cannot be taught.

  6. #96
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightning View Post
    My knowledge of history and theories in music is not much better. Had no patience for it you see. I'm just describing what it felt like to me.

    Back on topic! Music as flow? Love and to some essence life in general is about placing trust in the flow and letting go?

    Mr. wildcat?
    Where are you at?
    Mouse knows you're lurking...
    Upon the bank, chuckling.
    It looks as if it flows.
    An illusion.

    They say time flows.
    Another illusion.

  7. #97
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lastrailway View Post
    Without having any very strong background in music either, my take on this is that the silences (the rests) denote the rhythm of the music, or where a phrase starts and ends. It's very much like the punctuation in the written speech, which, as wildcat said, in the oral speech is transformed to pauses between words and change at the intonation of the speaker.
    I'd say that music is the notes, as speech is the words, but you need the silence (rests, pauses) in order to structure your music or speech. Without at least a minimal structure, one is at risk of being incomprehensible.
    You are right there, lastrailway.
    My neighbour does not punctuate his speech. It is very difficult to understand what he says.
    Intuition is necessary to a degree.

    I guess this is why forty per cent of the great Hollywood actors were left handed.
    Just listen to Eve Marie Saint or Cary Grant or Ralph Richardson. I do not know if they were left handed, though. They were of the Golden Era.
    Very many American presidents were left handed. Especially after the invention of the radio and the television.
    So how did they become presidents?

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    You are right there, lastrailway.
    My neighbour does not punctuate his speech. It is very difficult to understand what he says.
    Intuition is necessary to a degree.

    I guess this is why forty per cent of the great Hollywood actors were left handed.
    Just listen to Eve Marie Saint or Cary Grant or Ralph Richardson. I do not know if they were left handed, though. They were of the Golden Era.
    Very many American presidents were left handed. Especially after the invention of the radio and the television.
    So how did they become presidents?
    You think there is a correlation? I'm left-handed and I'm not sure whether I punctuate well enough.

  9. #99
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lastrailway View Post
    You think there is a correlation? I'm left-handed and I'm not sure whether I punctuate well enough.
    I am sure you do.
    Welcome to the left-handed club!

  10. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    I am sure you do.
    Welcome to the left-handed club!
    You're left-handed too?
    And what would be the correlation between being left-handed and punctuating correctly?

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