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  1. #1
    Senior Member niki's Avatar
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    Default how easy is it to change Type?

    I'm just curious as how easy (or possibility %) we can change Type?
    for example, from an INFP into ISFJ , ...and what's more curious is: is it even easy (and possible) to change only ONE letter, for example: from INFP to INFJ.
    or from INTJ to INTP, or from INTP to ENTP, or from INTP to ISTP ?
    how easy/hard is that?
    and if easy, then HOW or what makes it possible to change ur "natural preference"?

    The reason I'm asking this is that i've heard too many people here say that MBTI is just like horoscope-reading! and an INTJ friend of mine, although at first he gasped & wow-ed like crazy everytime he reads the INTJ description, which really surprisingly fits well wit him, suddenly turns 'cold' & said that: "c'mon! we can be ANYTHING we want to be! doesn't matter all those labels! besides, it's just human-made! ...you ARE you! not INFP, not INTP,
    INTJ, whatever
    !"

    I personally disagree that we can easily change Type, even for just ONE letter-change, is not easy. This is my opinion, because after all, MBTi is all about NATURAL preferences....and I somehow believe (based also from my own personal experiences from childhood times!) that natural preferences IS just natural preferences, and ever since we're childhood , the "preferences" just can't change easily as many people might think.
    Hence, I believe that it's even hard from INTP to morph into INTJ, for example... EXCEPT if the person is undergoing a very heavy & tremendous pressure to change (ie: can be pressure from society, or life-circumstances).

    What do u guys think?

  2. #2
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Me? I don't believe it is technically possible to change type.

    Your life circumstances can influence development, and make one type act more like another, but an innate preference is still developed there in a recognizable fashion. Of course all types can use all functions at various points.

  3. #3

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    I think we have some core traits that we cannot change.

    But I am still skeptical if any of the theories based on Jung's have accurately captured those core traits.

    If someone has a "core need" for "competence" does that mean this need will last for his whole life? I am skeptical, but I am still open to the idea.

    If someone has a "core drive" to to "integrate" many inputs, does it mean they will always aim to get the "best" result possible?

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  4. #4
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    I think we have some core traits that we cannot change.

    But I am still skeptical if any of the theories based on Jung's have accurately captured those core traits.

    If someone has a "core need" for "competence" does that mean this need will last for his whole life? I am skeptical, but I am still open to the idea.

    If someone has a "core drive" to to "integrate" many inputs, does it mean they will always aim to get the "best" result possible?
    I sometimes wonder about this myself. Jung's model was originally based on people with mental problems. There seems to be a reasonable grouping of traits associated with type, however.

    Thinking/Feeling is one preference I don't see quite as readily, except in individuals with extremes.

  5. #5
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    I have read that in Myers-Briggs theory as people become more mature they get better at using their weaknesses, so if you are an INFJ your ESTP side will become more pronounced, in other words in normal development we become more well rounded (at least this is the theory , I know nothing about debates about this within MB).

    This seems like all any reasonable person could hope for to me, I'm not sure what age it's supposed to happen to most people, 50's?.

    I know an ESTP very well, he was once wildly Extrovert, now around 40, he could almost be taken for an introvert.

    On the other hand I know another ESTP whose ESTP features have become very extreme with age, they are really hard for everyone to deal with, but they are a Peter Pan, never grew up. (there may be other problems like Narcissistic Personality Disorder).

  6. #6
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    It doesn't matter if MBTI is hard wired into our biology or if it's simply a human construct. A person's personality and modes of thinking are mostly solidified once they reach late teens to early 20's. After that they will change very slowly.
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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    It doesn't matter if MBTI is hard wired into our biology or if it's simply a human construct. A person's personality and modes of thinking are mostly solidified once they reach late teens to early 20's. After that they will change very slowly.
    It does seem that way doesn't it?

    But there are some developments I wanted to look into:

    Amazon.com: The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science (James H. Silberman Books): Books: Norman Doidge

    Amazon.com: Contemplative Science: Where Buddhism and Neuroscience Converge (Columbia Series in Science and Religion): Books: B. Alan Wallace

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  8. #8
    Senior Member niki's Avatar
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    ok, but when you mean by "change very slowly", do you mean...change as in 'develop our shadow function' , or 'changing our Type' , for example, from an INTP into an INTJ, or INTP into an ISTP ? ..

    i don't know, but i personally think that it's always possible to develop our 'shadow/weakness' parts, but to change entirely , even changing our "P" to become totally a "J", hence , from INTP into an INTJ, would be a LOT harder,..if not impossible...
    I still don't have any facts to back my statement, but based from my own personal observation of people close to me in my daily-life, from the adolescents age 'till their 40's, 50's (eg: my Dad) , it seems like this way..
    I could be entirely wrong, though...I'm being open-minded.

  9. #9
    Senior Member JivinJeffJones's Avatar
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    Heh, as soon as I saw this thread title I knew an INFP would be behind it.

  10. #10
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    Well, you should note that changing a J to a P means a complete exchange of all the functions (!)

    INFJ = Ni + Fe + Ti + Se
    INFP = Fi + Ne + Si +Te

    See? No functions alike at all! So you're not just changing a letter if you change P to J or vice versa .... you are swapping all your functions for ones you apparently weren't good enough in before to rank very highly. So that seems very unlikely. More likely a P has learned to find closure even when she does not want to, or a J has learned to flex when he did not care much for it.
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