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  1. #91
    Rainy Day Woman MDP2525's Avatar
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    I think the OP said something about how S and N present themselves in a work environment. I have worked in service industry for eight years now as a bartender/server/cook...you name it.

    Something I've noticed:

    I'm usually the one who can see a bar fight about to happen. I've often broken up many before they become a problem or before any of my co-workers notice a problem building. I'm usually the first to react or notice someone not "acting" right. I can sort of "sense" something in the "air" isn't right. I'm observant but not necessarily detail oriented. I know where people are located and I see how things might occur and I'm ready for that. I like that feeling. However, If you asked me what these people in the bar are wearing etc. Unless someone is the object of my attention, I probably wouldn't notice! I'd have to call back my memory to get that information. It's not at the forefront.

    My fellow ESFP bartender (one of my best friends) is much better at these concrete details than I am. Although, she misses the big picture a lot of times. (too busy bouncing around - literally! ). We work exceptionally well together. Yin and Yang, I suppose.
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  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antisocial one View Post
    I agree with this.
    S conversation style is often too concrete and to the point to grasp what is actually said . The only thing that saves me here is my strong Te. What means that I can swich to their style of communication if it is needed.
    Its funny that this style of S talking has taken the path of us being concrete and to the point. I can tell you from experience that with more dominant Te users there is a point to there speaking style and it is to purposely hide there intention. Apparently it works like a charm. It takes you down a path away from what they want to mislead you from there intention. You see there is no reading between the lines, you must back up and figure out what is in it for them. I have seen this many times from Js that have more dominant Te. They lead you down a path to convince you of something when it is really a path to satisfy Fi. Te is used to logically convince you that it is in your best interest so you are convinced that the path they chose is the one you want. Its kinda manipulation, but we all manipulate in some form or fashion. If Te really knows the other person it is a way for both parties to be happy. If there Fi gets selfish you start off like man they really are thinking of me only to realize down the line, wait this is for them. Like I said if they really do care and like you, the outcome of Te is in the best interest of both parties.

    And I have experience mostly with ISTJ so no this has nothing to do with the OP and him being a J with a more dominant Te, thats a coincidence

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by greed View Post
    I see a problem, and the solution just clicks in my mind. It's as though I've mentally threaded a needle through a bunch of different disconnected resources, and all that's left is to physically thread that needle (i.e. implement that solution). I kind of feel like Macgyver when it happens
    I see a solution and the problem just clicks in my mind or I see a problem and the solution just clicks in my mind. If I am around people with solutions I seem negative, but around people with problems I appear positive. To explain this I have to have an understanding of how everything works and how it all works together, this lets me see both solutions and problems and come up with some fuzzy logic of what route to take. This makes me a jack of all trades. This always includes the Fi of the person I am doing this for and what solution they feel the most comfortable with. Sometimes I may take over what they feel uncomfortable with so they feel more comfortable with a certain solution.

  4. #94
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    Ne - constantly subconsciously scanning your surroundings, looking for things to put together in the context of Fi/Ti
    Se - constantly consciously scanning your surroundings, looking for clues to deduce actions through the filter of Fi/Ti

    These do not have so much of the "sensory focus" issues that you speak of

    Si - constantly consciously taking information and judging it against inductive precepts in order to maintain consistency. More inclined to do this toward your Te/Fe preference

    Also doesn't have the sensory focus issue, as it's a conscious process

    Ni - constantly subconsciously noticing information and inductively creating an Fe/Te proposition based on relevant information

    The sensory focus issue comes less from it being an N function as much as it is an inductive function - that is, information that is irrelevant to the proposition that the brain is trying to create will be discarded. Ne has less of a problem with this because it's more of a deductive process - it constantly seeks more information to come to valid conclusions about, and thus will be more attuned to one's surroundings, though not in as concrete a manner as the S functions.

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    Ne - constantly subconsciously scanning your surroundings, looking for things to put together in the context of Fi/Ti
    Se - constantly consciously scanning your surroundings, looking for clues to deduce actions through the filter of Fi/Ti

    These do not have so much of the "sensory focus" issues that you speak of

    Si - constantly consciously taking information and judging it against inductive precepts in order to maintain consistency. More inclined to do this toward your Te/Fe preference

    Also doesn't have the sensory focus issue, as it's a conscious process

    Ni - constantly subconsciously noticing information and inductively creating an Fe/Te proposition based on relevant information

    The sensory focus issue comes less from it being an N function as much as it is an inductive function - that is, information that is irrelevant to the proposition that the brain is trying to create will be discarded. Ne has less of a problem with this because it's more of a deductive process - it constantly seeks more information to come to valid conclusions about, and thus will be more attuned to one's surroundings, though not in as concrete a manner as the S functions.
    I agree and it goes against the authors statement of not noticing your surroundings. This is what trips me up about statements of N not being about your senses. Ni may not be about your senses, but Ne is and it seems like the OP keeps pushing that N is not about what your senses take in. It can really confuse people because even though Ne may relate things it has to take in information from its senses. Both Se and Ne has to scan its environment. What the op is refering to is Ni which has nothing to do with the external environment and is why he may miss obvious concrete things. Since he has it linked to high up the chain as an N thing as opposed to Ni it is misleading. Se actually discards alot of information because we dont have the time to process it all similiar to how Ne discards because of the same reasons. I forget alot of detail if I dont have time to process it.

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