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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post
    Heh, I think it's safe to say that any T can say that most people are more F than them That is normally what people mean, really. Which is funny, because I'm less T than most males Somewhere around the 40-50% of the population.
    This comes into play when typing, you compare others to yourself. So if you are a strong T you think everyone else is an F. Especially if they try to hug you, ick.

  2. #32
    Once Was Synarch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pippi View Post
    This comes into play when typing, you compare others to yourself. So if you are a strong T you think everyone else is an F. Especially if they try to hug you, ick.
    I am pretty huggy with my friends and family. But, maybe this is because I am Italian or something. Or, a closet homo.
    "Create like a god, command like a king, work like a slave."

  3. #33
    Diabolical Kasper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BerberElla View Post
    Anyway has anyone ever found that they are quicker to roughly type a female as an F, or is it just me?
    Nope. If I meet a woman who can handle or even enjoy my bluntness and I find myself not having to censor what I say too much Iíd guess they were a T, if I struggle with that, Iíll assume F. I donít guess one way or the other without reason. No point making baseless assumptions.

  4. #34
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    Hmm... I don't think I have any bias when typing people, although it could be subconscious. I can't really think of many women I know that I would consider T's, but I can think of plenty of guys that are F's.

  5. #35
    Senior Member Simplexity's Avatar
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    I actually was just thinking about this the other day with one of my friends. It really was uncanny how many value driven statements he made. Like "he's just a good guy, I feel bad arguing with him, He's a guy you don't really want to do that with" when discussing a principal we used to always get into arguments with. I think the biggest thing is how evident those value's are and how frequent they come into play in conversations. There's been many a time I had to annoyingly curb my analysis because it broached on a topic he felt strongly about. Guys have a tendency to deny this and also elevate their "logical, objective" proficiency but with a certain amount of time it's evident.

    I think the mode of communication when talking to girls and talking about them is pretty clear at times too. I know plenty of times we'll be talking about the same thing with him, me, and my ISTJ friend and be on two different parallels. The bluntness in my ISTJ friend is very pronounced as well. A lot less tact and cushioning. Much different vibe as well.
    My cold, snide, intellectual life is just a veneer, behind which lies the plywood of loneliness.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by nozflubber View Post
    Yeah this is a huge problem when typing.... as I tend to do the same

    But just to add even more complexity to the situation, get this: I had orignally typed my gay INTJ friend as like ENFP or INFP, because he's pretty chatty and has tons of friends (mostly women). So I also think there's a tendancy to type male homosexuals as F, and perhaps female homosexuals as T
    Even if a lesbian looks masculine, don't automatically consider her a T. Just acting manly isn't an indication of cognitive processes. This is my quote from another thread. The data was pulled from a personal sample size of 50, and the general lesbian culture.

    Lesbians generally have a predictable mode of operation. Meet, fall in love, move in together. I've seen women merge in two weeks to a month. Not just a few couples. Practically every lesbian I have ever known (Except an ENTP and fellow INTJ). It's the most unnerving ritual I've ever witnessed. The 2nd date u-haul and turkey baster jokes exist for a reason.
    The aforementioned insanity, leads me to believe most lesbians are F.

  7. #37
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    Simply put, it's a rarity. A female T has to be celebrated.
    lemons, I don't think that's true, maybe you are just not looking in the right places??
    I work in a hi-tech company, and let me tell you, there are plenty of women who work here, and MOST are Ts!!!....(In the techie department of course )

    I'm totally serious.

  8. #38
    Member Jwill's Avatar
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    Well, I read a quote somewhere that only a quarter of INTJs are female. So, I'm in the minority there.

    As far as F vs T for males/females, I think that sometimes people misunderstand what F means. I think my brother's an F, but he's not sitting there crying all the time during sappy movies. He's more likely to get angry or frustrated or annoyed than I am. He's maybe a little more sympathetic, too. Me, I'm flat-lined. I had him take the test once, and he was an NF. Recently, I had him just choose between the different letters, and he vehemently said he was an NT. He doesn't think he's emotional, but he categorizes emotion as weeping or being completely irrational.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwill View Post
    Well, I read a quote somewhere that only a quarter of INTJs are female. So, I'm in the minority there.

    As far as F vs T for males/females, I think that sometimes people misunderstand what F means. I think my brother's an F, but he's not sitting there crying all the time during sappy movies. He's more likely to get angry or frustrated or annoyed than I am. He's maybe a little more sympathetic, too. Me, I'm flat-lined. I had him take the test once, and he was an NF. Recently, I had him just choose between the different letters, and he vehemently said he was an NT. He doesn't think he's emotional, but he categorizes emotion as weeping or being completely irrational.
    Fe can be objective and directional. It's mostly goal driven. Fi is inner value and judgment. Neither neccessarily means emotion in the sense that most people perceive it.

  10. #40
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Separating the male/female cultural overlay on top of the MBTI categories is not necessarily simple or obvious.
    There is some cultural difference in male and female style of communication. I did some reading on it a while back, but am at a loss as to the specific references at the moment. If I have time I'll try to figure it out.

    Basically, male communication is more direct, with fewer adjectives and qualifiers, and more decisive. There are a number of aspects of this that correlate to what is understood to be T. Much of the professional world requires a compartmentalizing of reason vs. emotion, objectivity vs. personal experience, etc. To function successfully in the professional world, this male oriented style of communication needs to be adopted to be perceived as intelligent and competent. Women who succeed in having their minds and skills taken seriously often learn to adapt to these expectations. Many are required to overcompensate in order to be seen as a peer, often coming across as colder and less personal than their male counterparts. These women would also be typed as "T". Does this mean that women who maintain a softer, more "feminine" style of communication are F's by default? That they are less prone to preferring logic? Or that men who maintain a professional demeanor and clear communication who are motivated primarily by the approval of others are T?

    My position is that type theory is based on cognitive processing which can influence communication style, but is not defined by the way in which one interfaces with the world. This is because that external interface is the part that is most influenced by experience and culture. This is also because there can be several different motivations and reasoning styles to produce the same behaviors. I'll give one example: A person takes an aggressive stance on the phone to clear up a mistake on a bill. This person could feel angry and threatened by the mistake and operates on the assumption that conflicts are worked out by expressing everything you feel and just getting it all out there by getting the other person to feel equally threatened and therefore produce some empathy. Another person might see the aggressive stance as the most likely behavior to produce the desired result and might even do a little acting to play the role most effectively, but would be just as willing to take another approach if deemed more effective. It is the reasoning behind the actions that is the cognitive processing.
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