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  1. #1
    Queen hunter Virtual ghost's Avatar
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    Default What non NJs think about Ni?

    I am sure that there has been similar threads, but I am starting this one once again.

    In short.

    What do you think about Ni and how do imagine it?

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    It's one of the four Jungian functions I identify about equally well with, the others being Ne, Ti, and Te. Jung was apparently a bit of a mystic, and described Ni as a bit mystical, which I suppose can be taken as read or not. I've chosen to disregard that slant as error.

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    IRL is not real Cimarron's Avatar
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    I find it hard to believe it exists (which shouldn't surprise you, Antisocial one). But people say it does, they say they think that way with little or no effort, and for all I know they could be making it all up. So I take their word for it. What else can I do?

    It keeps things interesting. Too much can be too "interesting", though. In those cases, I'll just duck out of the room for a while.
    You can't spell "justice" without ISTJ.

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    Senior Member Tayshaun's Avatar
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    Ni?


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    Occasional Member Evan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tayshaun View Post
    Ni?


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    The Memes Justify the End EcK's Avatar
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    I really have no idea what Ni really stands for.
    For me intuition picks on paterns and things, external you know.

    What is there to pick up within you? I mean, enough to keep you interested. And how do you relate to the external world.

    em, explain ! NOW!
    Expression of the post modern paradox : "For the love of god, religions are so full of shit"

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    IRL is not real Cimarron's Avatar
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    What do I think about Ni?

    I admire the Knights who say it.
    You can't spell "justice" without ISTJ.

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    This might as well be posted here for reference. Jung:

    8. Intuition

    Intuition, in the introverted attitude, is directed upon the inner object, a term we might justly apply to the elements of the unconscious. For the relation of inner objects to consciousness is entirely analogous to that of outer objects, although theirs is a psychological and not a physical reality. Inner objects appear to the intuitive perception as subjective images of things, which, though not met with in external experience, really determine the contents of the unconscious, i.e. the collective unconscious, in the last resort. Naturally, in their per se character, these contents are, not accessible to experience, a quality which they have in common with the outer object. For just as outer objects correspond only relatively with our perceptions of them, so the phenomenal forms of the inner object are also relative; products of their (to us) inaccessible essence and of the peculiar nature of the intuitive function. Like sensation, intuition also has its subjective factor, which is suppressed to the farthest limit in the extraverted intuition, but which becomes the decisive factor in the intuition of the introvert. Although this intuition may receive its impetus from outer objects, it is never arrested by the external possibilities, but stays with that factor which the outer object releases within.

    Whereas introverted sensation is mainly confined to the perception of particular innervation phenomena by way of the unconscious, and does not go beyond them, intuition represses this side of the subjective factor and perceives the image which has really occasioned the innervation. Supposing, for instance, a man is overtaken by a psychogenic attack of giddiness. Sensation is arrested by the peculiar character of this innervationdisturbance, perceiving all its qualities, its intensity, its transient course, the nature of its origin and disappearance [p. 506] in their every detail, without raising the smallest inquiry concerning the nature of the thing which produced the disturbance, or advancing anything as to its content. Intuition, on the other hand, receives from the sensation only the impetus to immediate activity; it peers behind the scenes, quickly perceiving the inner image that gave rise to the specific phenomenon, i.e. the attack of vertigo, in the present case. It sees the image of a tottering man pierced through the heart by an arrow. This image fascinates the intuitive activity; it is arrested by it, and seeks to explore every detail of it. It holds fast to the vision, observing with the liveliest interest how the picture changes, unfolds further, and finally fades. In this way introverted intuition perceives all the background processes of consciousness with almost the same distinctness as extraverted sensation senses outer objects. For intuition, therefore, the unconscious images attain to the dignity of things or objects. But, because intuition excludes the co-operation of sensation, it obtains either no knowledge at all or at the best a very inadequate awareness of the innervation-disturbances or of the physical effects produced by the unconscious images. Accordingly, the images appear as though detached from the subject, as though existing in themselves without relation to the person.

    Consequently, in the above-mentioned example, the introverted intuitive, when affected by the giddiness, would not imagine that the perceived image might also in some way refer to himself. Naturally, to one who is rationally orientated, such a thing seems almost unthinkable, but it is none the less a fact, and I have often experienced it in my dealings with this type.

    The remarkable indifference of the extraverted intuitive in respect to outer objects is shared by the introverted intuitive in relation to the inner objects. Just as the extraverted intuitive is continually scenting out new [p. 507] possibilities, which he pursues with an equal unconcern both for his own welfare and for that of others, pressing on quite heedless of human considerations, tearing down what has only just been established in his everlasting search for change, so the introverted intuitive moves from image to image, chasing after every possibility in the teeming womb of the unconscious, without establishing any connection between the phenomenon and himself. Just as the world can never become a moral problem for the man who merely senses it, so the world of images is never a moral problem to the intuitive. To the one just as much as to the other, it is an ae[]sthenic problem, a question of perception, a 'sensation'. In this way, the consciousness of his own bodily existence fades from the introverted intuitive's view, as does its effect upon others. The extraverted standpoint would say of him: 'Reality has no existence for him; he gives himself up to fruitless phantasies'. A perception of the unconscious images, produced in such inexhaustible abundance by the creative energy of life, is of course fruitless from the standpoint of immediate utility. But, since these images represent possible ways of viewing life, which in given circumstances have the power to provide a new energic potential, this function, which to the outer world is the strangest of all, is as indispensable to the total psychic economy as is the corresponding human type to the psychic life of a people. Had this type not existed, there would have been no prophets in Israel.

    Introverted intuition apprehends the images which arise from the a priori, i.e. the inherited foundations of the unconscious mind. These archetypes, whose innermost nature is inaccessible to experience, represent the precipitate of psychic functioning of the whole ancestral line, i.e. the heaped-up, or pooled, experiences of organic existence in general, a million times repeated, and condensed into types. Hence, in these archetypes all experiences are [p. 508] represented which since primeval time have happened on this planet. Their archetypal distinctness is the more marked, the more frequently and intensely they have been experienced. The archetype would be -- to borrow from Kant -- the noumenon of the image which intuition perceives and, in perceiving, creates.

    Since the unconscious is not just something that lies there, like a psychic caput mortuum, but is something that coexists and experiences inner transformations which are inherently related to general events, introverted intuition, through its perception of inner processes, gives certain data which may possess supreme importance for the comprehension of general occurrences: it can even foresee new possibilities in more or less clear outline, as well as the event which later actually transpires. Its prophetic prevision is to be explained from its relation to the archetypes which represent the law-determined course of all experienceable things.

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    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Ni is the acronym for Introverted-Intuitive, and is a counterpart in, as Jack said, the four Jungian matrices: Ni (Introverted-Intuitive), Ne (Extraverted-Intuitive), Te (Extraverted Thinking), and Ti (Extraverted-Thinking). Obviously, everyone has to be one or another, and they all have their own characteristics.

    I would described the Ni as being larger than life. Their imagination farther out, than maybe even Ne because of how reserved they can be. Ni's are mystical, and very secretive, letting little out of the huge resevoir of imagination that they hold dearly. They are unpredictable, and see events before they occur. m

    I'm not saying this to favor Ni, I am simply pointing out traits of Ni, as there are many traits for the other three, and the Ni lacks.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

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    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cimarron View Post
    What do I think about Ni?

    I admire the Knights who say it.
    LOL.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

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