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  1. #11
    Member Nat's Avatar
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    This is a very interesting thread... I'd like to see what others think of this as well.

    I have tested as both an introvert and extrovert, but some of the responses from introverts makes me question again whether I am actually introverted...

    I enjoy some time alone, but after an extended period I feel like I need to find someone to interact with. I enjoy going to places that are noisy and filled with people. I feel recharged when I'm with people I'm close to. Being on my own doesn't put me in a better mood than I was - in fact I think it often deteriorates into negativity.

    On the other hand, I can feel a bit awkward and anxious with new people/people I don't know well (this does drain me) and I would much prefer spending time with family or my close group of friends than others. People think I'm somewhat reserved/quiet when they meet me but once I get to know them, I'm often talking a lot more than them.

    Shy extrovert? More extroverted introvert? I'm confused...

  2. #12
    Diabolical Kasper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flak View Post
    E=The desire to engage the world of people, directly or indirectly.
    I=The desire to avoid the world of people.
    What the hell does it mean if there are times the first fits and times the second fits along with times others energise me and times being alone energises?

  3. #13
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    Introverts are the ones who tend to leave parties first to go home. They are the ones who are perfectly happy saying nothing at work, just working by your side. They'll have a convo and probably chatter non-stop when engaged, but they are happy either way. They won't necessarily initiate though.
    Introverts will never willingly speak up at a meeting.
    They are the ones who take their time to speak, and often can't answer questions when put on the spot, especially after absorbing a decent amount of info. They'er still processing it.
    Introverts are often the people who will say something regarding a previous conversation 3 hours ago, out of the blue.
    Hope this helps some....at least in the people watching department. They might not necessarily be "quiet" and "shy" and standing off to the side when there's a bunch of people around.They can be in the thick of it. One other sign, often introverts are independent, that is won't necessarily wait for others to do something. It can be a subtle thing sometimes, especially, in older people and they have learnt how to camoflage to a degree. Hope this helps?
    I like to be alone, so I can rearrange my thoughts, and hear myself think. I have a bit of monologue going in my head, and I can't always "hear" that when around other people. That may be a quirk of an INFP's empathy though. It's my way of touching base with my inner self, my thoughts and feelings. That's maybe why Fi is so hard to understand too, now that I come to think of, because often people see the beginnings of the thought process or gut reaction in the response "I don't like it" we haven't fully processed yet when we've had the gut reaction. It's not until we processed all the info at hand, can we begin to understand why we felt that way. Hope I haven't derailed the thread with that thought.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
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  4. #14
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinity View Post
    What the hell does it mean if there are times the first fits and times the second fits along with times others energise me and times being alone energises?
    I'm like that too, I like company but I know I'm introverted by default because I need to escape at times, even if I enjoy the company. I just NEED to. It's like a physical sensation, like hunger or needing to pee.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

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  5. #15
    Member TrueHeart's Avatar
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    Many, perhaps most, of the replies so far have not really given a definition of introversion, but a description of (some of) its aspects or symptoms, so to speak. Here is Dr. van der Hoop's discussion, in which I have emphasized what I think is the essential definition:

    .... It was observed that some people, in the way in which they consciously seek direction and adjustment in their lives, are almost exclusively guided by objects of the external world. Facts and, circumstances, the opinions and feelings of other people, and ideas in current use, determine the adaptations which these people make to life. When in difficulty, they seek support first of all from the external world. Jung calls these people outwardly directed, or extraverted types. Another group of people are guided, in so far as conscious motives are concerned, by entirely different factors; they are primarily conscious of their own subjective reactions to events. They are peculiarly sensitive to these—to what they feel, how they think, about any situation. Where these reactions conflict, they seek to weld them into some sort of harmony of attitude and opinion. In their adjustment to life they thus take as starting-point their own needs and the demands of their own being. They also consult these when in difficulty, and for this purpose they withdraw into themselves. For this reason Jung called them inwardly directed, or introverted types.

    A closer investigation shows us that we are here dealing, not with different character-structures, but with typical habits of emphasis, for in everyone we find both forms of adjustment, and it is impossible to say that the one form remains entirely unconscious while the other prevails in consciousness. Under certain conditions, everyone will consciously direct himself towards the external world, while under other conditions he will turn to himself for counsel. Introverted and extraverted states occur in everyone. The only difference is the fact that one person will feel more at home in the one state, while another will find the other more familiar. The extraverted individual will feel much more secure when in contact with other people than when alone. If he reflects too long by himself, everything becomes more confused than if he can guide himself by the opinions of others. The extravert will therefore prefer to maintain contact with others for as long as possible, and if he should find himself in an introverted state, he will soon escape from it. The reactions of others assume more precise and more differentiated forms in his consciousness than do his own.

    With introverts, it is exactly the opposite. For them the introverted state is the safest and most agreeable. Alone with himself, the introvert knows exactly what he wants. In contact with others, he loses his sense of security. He finds it an overwhelmingly difficult task to assert himself and to express himself properly. When alone, he feels himself at ease; and when forced into contact with the external world, he has no regrets when the contact is broken and he may withdraw into himself once more. Since an individual of this type is more intensively in touch with himself than with others, he will know his own intentions relatively better than those of other people, and the activities of his own ego will be more differentiated in his mind than those of the external world....
    Conscious Orientation: Jung's Psychological Types

    IOW, introverts are people primarily oriented towards and guided by their own internal, subjective experiences and reactions.
    "There can be no understanding between the hands and the head unless the heart acts as mediator." (Metropolis, 1927)

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  6. #16
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanveane View Post
    True for me. I don't really suffer without the company of others... though love spending time with the people I love. I like socializing, but I really don't need it. Explanation via e.g.: I went to a party recently I didn't know the hosts well (both extroverts) not at all shy about going alone. I talked with loads of different people until 8am the following morning. That afternoon they rang and wanted to do it again... ('are you serious, no way, see you in a month!') Love people, but they still drain me.
    ha-ha! Love that! Excellent example of introversion.
    ...
    I am energized and regroup by having alone time. Unscheduled do-whatever-I-want alone time. Not being interrupted by another person. If I don't have it, I become very unhappy! I know a lot of extroverts say they need this too, but I suspect they can go a lot longer without it. I need it at regular intervals regardless. I would imagine an extrovert can fit it in around their interactions with other people?? (Just guessing.)
    I have experienced this as well. As a matter of fact, I discovered that if I don't get to be alone at all, for like a week, I will become deeply depressed and have suicidal thoughts.

    I also prefer my own company when I'm very upset, though I try not to shut my partner out if they want to be around.

    EDIT: Basically, I feel weird if I'm around people for too long or unrelentingly. I will crave alone time. I think an extrovert on the other hand will feel agitated if they are not around people for an extended period of time and will crave company.
    Excellent post. Excellent description of E vs I.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    This is a very interesting thread... I'd like to see what others think of this as well.

    I have tested as both an introvert and extrovert, but some of the responses from introverts makes me question again whether I am actually introverted...

    I enjoy some time alone, but after an extended period I feel like I need to find someone to interact with. I enjoy going to places that are noisy and filled with people. I feel recharged when I'm with people I'm close to. Being on my own doesn't put me in a better mood than I was - in fact I think it often deteriorates into negativity.

    On the other hand, I can feel a bit awkward and anxious with new people/people I don't know well (this does drain me) and I would much prefer spending time with family or my close group of friends than others. People think I'm somewhat reserved/quiet when they meet me but once I get to know them, I'm often talking a lot more than them.

    Shy extrovert? More extroverted introvert? I'm confused...
    I think it's more likely that you are an extravert.

    I have a 15 year old son who is an ENFJ and you sound like him.

  7. #17
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrueHeart View Post
    Many, perhaps most, of the replies so far have not really given a definition of introversion, but a description of (some of) its aspects or symptoms, so to speak. Here is Dr. van der Hoop's discussion, in which I have emphasized what I think is the essential definition:

    some people, in the way in which they consciously seek direction and adjustment in their lives, are almost exclusively guided by objects of the external world. Facts and, circumstances, the opinions and feelings of other people, and ideas in current use, determine the adaptations which these people make to life. When in difficulty, they seek support first of all from the external world. Jung calls these people outwardly directed, or extraverted types. Another group of people are guided, in so far as conscious motives are concerned, by entirely different factors; they are primarily conscious of their own subjective reactions to events. They are peculiarly sensitive to these—to what they feel, how they think, about any situation. Where these reactions conflict, they seek to weld them into some sort of harmony of attitude and opinion. In their adjustment to life they thus take as starting-point their own needs and the demands of their own being. They also consult these when in difficulty, and for this purpose they withdraw into themselves. For this reason Jung called them inwardly directed, or introverted types.
    Conscious Orientation: Jung's Psychological Types

    IOW, introverts are people primarily oriented towards and guided by their own internal, subjective experiences and reactions.
    Thank you for that.

  8. #18
    Let's make this showy! raz's Avatar
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    It depends on the company you're around, and extraversion isn't only limited to people. It's an outward focus on the external world. It applies to external activity in the outside world that is not associated with people, also. Take ENTPs for example. They're extraverted, but from what I've gathered, they're not extremely dependent on other people for energy. Their focus is on interaction with the outside world in general through their extraverted intuition.

    One way introverts are described in one book I read was as having a "mind blank" effect in conversations. Other introverts may not experience this or may experience it on a different level. I know at least when I'm with strangers or a large crowd of people, it takes me 20 minutes just to formulate a complete thought. However, if I'm with my immediate family or close friends, I'm completely relaxed and just off in my own world or talking to them.

    This is about people, though. There's also the disconnect from the outside world. I'd have to say that my mind is my first priority, and what's going on around me is second priority. Many times, I'm completely oblivious to what's going on around me because I need to think. Even at work, I have this constant barrage of customers, handling checkouts, and dealing with coworkers. At times, I'll notice myself completely missing something I was doing because I was lost in my thoughts.

    The thing with the constant contemplation, though, is it is different for each type and their cognitive processes. Take an INxJ for example. Their brain is likely filled with constant new ideas. Me, an ISTJ, though? I'm constantly thinking about how to better control my life.

    But, I always thought there was something wrong me, because I have absolutely no problem spending all day alone in front of my computer. It feels like freedom. Even at school, I can so easily just put on my headphones, walk to class, listen to the teacher, rinse and repeat until I go home. I wouldn't need to interact with someone else unless I really had to. I've had to learn how to force myself. It's not hostility toward other people, although sometimes it does turn into it. I just don't NEED the focus on the outside world.

    As others have said, though, I fail at coming up with answers to questions on the spot. I always chalked it up as just a lack of social experience. I've learned from the MBTI though, that it isn't always being a social outcast. I've been able to make myself tell people lately, "Just give me a little bit to think about this." Like, for instance, my sister came in my room and asked me to sell something on ebay for her, and she wanted it carried out that instant. She's an ENFJ. She could probably do that, but I couldn't. I told her to wait. I needed a little bit to think about what we needed to do and how I wanted to do it.

  9. #19
    Senior Membrane spirilis's Avatar
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    Without reading any of the replies, I generally consider 'introversion' as any state of mind which has the characteristic of excluding external interaction or tends to ignore immediate external stimuli as part of its mindset. Sitting on a couch in the middle of a party, staring at the wall and thinking about how beautiful the woman across the room is... would be an introverted activity, IMO.

    I just had an example (typed it in here, then erased it) involving computer/internet-based communication but it occurred to me that internet-based communication blurs the lines in some ways. A voice-chat, for instance, is something I'd consider an extraverted activity since it requires one to think in the realm of external interaction with someone else, whereas typing up an email to someone (who does not respond in real-time).... makes me wonder how blurry the line is between introversion and extraversion.

    There are derivatives of this idea, such as an "Introverted point of view," which would refer to a POV one might glean while thinking in an introverted way.
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  10. #20
    Let's make this showy! raz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spirilis View Post
    Without reading any of the replies, I generally consider 'introversion' as any state of mind which has the characteristic of excluding external interaction or tends to ignore immediate external stimuli as part of its mindset. Sitting on a couch in the middle of a party, staring at the wall and thinking about how beautiful the woman across the room is... would be an introverted activity, IMO.

    I just had an example involving computer/internet-based communication but it occurred to me that internet-based communication blurs the lines in some ways. A voice-chat, for instance, is something I'd consider an extraverted activity since it requires one to think in the realm of external interaction with someone else, whereas typing up an email to someone (who does not respond in real-time).... makes me wonder how blurry the line is between introversion and extraversion.

    There are derivatives of this idea, such as an "Introverted point of view," which would refer to a POV one might glean while thinking in an introverted way.
    Chatting on the internet is so introverted. Voice chat, though, no.

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