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  1. #21
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    Reading Jung’s description of Si, I figured out that her S function was taking in all these facts and details and storing them for future use. And then somehow, she would get a "hunch" that would just seemingly pop up out of nowhere, yet was actually based on facts or information she might have taken in 5 or 10 years before! Incredible!

    Once I read that, I realized that Ni works the same way, except for a difference in the type of information it takes in. In my case, I am always looking for underlying truths and general principles that will always apply in every situation. I love wise sayings that are always true. I believe that’s why I was naturally good in geometry. I memorized all those laws. They made sense to me. I got an A without even trying very hard.

    So to tie it together with Si, I see Ni as collecting principles and truths and remembering them for later use. Then, at another time, even years later, when they apply in a certain situation, they will come forward and make themselves known though only in a fog-like state, not in a clear – oh I know where that came from – kind of way.
    .
    A great description, thank you. It's perfectly describes the difference between Ni and Si. Ni isn't some silly mystical function nor is Si dull as dirt. They're pretty much the same with the exception that one looks at facts and the other patterns.

  2. #22
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Would you define "patterns" cause I don't think I do that?

  3. #23
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    In my blog I gave some of my own perspectives on Ni:
    I have the constant problem of being unable to fully articulate my views. It isn't because my views are not fully developed to any extent, it mostly has to due to the fact that I'm an Introverted Intuitive, and Ni by nature is not something that can be fully expressed through words.

    Not only that, as I mentioned elsewhere, Ni is all about Meta-perspective - seeing things from a full perspective. When you see things from the "50,000 ft." perspective, there's simply too much to describe and explain to somebody else. You literally have to see it for yourself to believe it. Bluewing in his INFJ profile mentioned that INFJs are often overwhelmed by the myriad of ideas that flow through their minds.

    To add on to that, Ni is very random and irrational. The insights it provides don't come readily, and only appear momentarily. So only for short, but very intense, periods at a time can I ever articulate my views to a great extent. Unfortunately, too often right when I'm the middle of articulation, my mind literally goes blank.

    Which in the end gives the impression of my thoughts being rather fragmentary in nature. The reality behind the actual words is far different, there's literally an entire universe other people simply don't see.

    http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...tml#post325729
    So hopefully this answers the OP.

  4. #24
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    In my blog I gave some of my own perspectives on Ni:


    So hopefully this answers the OP.
    Thank you. I'll have to stop by your blog now and then. I can identify with your description.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  5. #25
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    Way to go Mom! You have taken that step beyond dichotomies. I like your description of Si as well and you're correct from all that I have read on Si/Ni usage. Jung however gives not so great a description of the two considering them both the most out touch functions.
    The two types just depicted are almost inaccessible to external judgment. Because they are introverted and have in consequence a somewhat meagre capacity or willingness for expression, they offer but a frail handle for a telling criticism. Since their main activity is directed within, nothing is outwardly visible but reserve, secretiveness, lack of sympathy, or uncertainty, and an apparently groundless perplexity. When anything does come to the surface, it usually consists in indirect manifestations of inferior and relatively unconscious functions. Manifestations of such a nature naturally excite a certain environmental prejudice against these types. Accordingly they are mostly underestimated, or at least misunderstood. To the same degree as they fail to understand themselves -- because they very largely lack judgment -- they are also powerless to understand why they are so constantly undervalued by public opinion. They cannot see that their outward-going expression is, as a matter of fact, also of an inferior character. Their vision is enchanted by the abundance of subjective events. What happens there is so captivating, and of such inexhaustible attraction, that they do not appreciate the fact that their habitual communications to their circle express very, little of that real experience in which they themselves are, as it were, caught up. The fragmentary and, as a rule, quite episodic character of their communications make too great a demand upon the understanding and good will of their circle; furthermore, their mode of expression lacks that flowing warmth to the object which alone can have convincing force. On the contrary, these types show very often a brusque, repelling demeanour towards the outer world, although of this they are quite unaware, and have not the least intention of showing it. We shall form a [p. 512] fairer judgment of such men and grant them a greater indulgence, when we begin to realize how hard it is to translate into intelligible language what is perceived within. Yet this indulgence must not be so liberal as to exempt them altogether from the necessity of such expression. This could be only detrimental for such types. Fate itself prepares for them, perhaps even more than for other men, overwhelming external difficulties, which have a very sobering effect upon the intoxication of the inner vision. But frequently only an intense personal need can wring from them a human expression.

    From an extraverted and rationalistic standpoint, such types are indeed the most fruitless of men. But, viewed from a higher standpoint, such men are living evidence of the fact that this rich and varied world with its overflowing and intoxicating life is not purely external, but also exists within. These types are admittedly one sided demonstrations of Nature, but they are an educational experience for the man who refuses to be blinded by the intellectual mode of the day. In their own way, men with such an attitude are educators and promoters of culture. Their life teaches more than their words. From their lives, and not the least from what is just their greatest fault, viz. their incommunicability, we may understand one of the greatest errors of our civilization, that is, the superstitious belief in statement and presentation, the immoderate overprizing of instruction by means of word and method. A child certainly allows himself to be impressed by the grand talk of its parents. But is it really imagined that the child is thereby educated? Actually it is the parents' lives that educate the child -- what they add thereto by word and gesture at best serves only to confuse him. The same holds good for the teacher. But we have such a belief in method that, if only the method be good, the practice of it seems to hallow the teacher. An inferior [p. 513] man is never. a good teacher. But he can conceal his injurious inferiority, which secretly poisons the pupil, behind an excellent method or, an equally brilliant intellectual capacity. Naturally the pupil of riper years desires nothing better than the knowledge of useful methods, because he is already defeated by the general attitude, which believes in the victorious method. He has already learnt that the emptiest head, correctly echoing a method, is the best pupil. His whole environment not only urges but exemplifies the doctrine that all success and happiness are external, and that only the right method is needed to attain the haven of one's desires. Or is the life of his religious instructor likely to demonstrate that happiness which radiates from the treasure of the inner vision? The irrational introverted types are certainly no instructors of a more complete humanity. They lack reason and the ethics of reason, but their lives teach the other possibility, in which our civilization is so deplorably wanting.

  6. #26
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    Would you define "patterns" cause I don't think I do that?
    "Patterns" = the underlying principles... overarching pattern that is found within everything. I'm using the term metaphorically.

  7. #27
    Senior Mugwump Apollanaut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightning View Post
    "Patterns" = the underlying principles... overarching pattern that is found within everything. I'm using the term metaphorically.
    For me, my Ni pattern recognition is most powerful when I strip away all of my labels, concepts and preconceptions relating to a subject and truly perceive the underlying raw data itself. It's like peering into the heart of Chaos itself and finding extraordinary meaning there.
    INFJ 9w1 sx/sp/so

    "A wizard is never late. Nor is he early. He arrives precisely when he means to." - Gandalf The Grey

    And if I only could,
    I'd make a deal with God,
    And I'd get him to swap our places,
    Be running up that road,
    Be running up that hill,
    With no problems.

    - Kate Bush

  8. #28
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightning View Post
    "Patterns" = the underlying principles... overarching pattern that is found within everything. I'm using the term metaphorically.
    I wonder why they call it a "pattern"? All this time, and I didn't know that's what they meant!
    Obviously, this is nothing against you - you didn't invent the usage of the word.
    Pattern is not a good word for it. That must skew test results.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Kristiana's Avatar
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    Do you think of Ni as an eccentric function?
    Yes.

    Do you feel your Ni giving strange insights for you?
    I wouldn't say that's all my Ni does, but yes, my Ni can be very strange.

    How would you notice them being strange?
    Oh... multiple, frequent prophetic dreams... dream telepathy on one instance... premonition type feelings that come true... synchronicities to the point of insane weirdness... figuring things out about people that I'd logically have no clue were true, but they are... that sort of thing That's not all there is to my Ni or to Ni in general, but those are the strange things I notice about it!

    Can Ni processes be explained?
    I think a lot of it comes down to having a good grasp of my unconscious, as well as being self-aware and intellectual. Also, I tend to learn very broadly and conceptually, so it can come off as strange when I seemingly "get" something without having to try, whereas others tend to need more practice.

    How does the "eccentricity", "strangeness" or "uniqueness" in your person relate to Ni?
    Well, I enjoy being weird, and most people can probably tell that I'm not your stereotypical girl lol. I'm not exactly sure what you're asking though.
    j'adore les chats

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