Enneagram Instinctual Types
www.enneagram.net • ©1995-2014 Katherine Chernick Fauvre

Self Preserving
Self-preserving instinctual types are driven by the ongoing search for survival and well-being. Anything that could possibly damage, endanger, or exploit the self and/or the body is of concern. The focus of attention is subtly on "the self," "my body," "my world" and, "my resources and needs."

The primary desire is for survival which is manifested by a continual perceived quest for a sense of well being and for the "essentials" of life, such as: safety, security, food, shelter, clothing, comfort, protection, and resources. They tend to be maternal individuals that seek and offer or withhold nurturance.

The concerns of the self-preserving types involve issues of living and compromise - for example, "to be or not to be" or "how to be." The survival strategy places an intense emphasis on either caution or self-destruction. The focus is to aggressively go after what one needs and/or to defensively hold onto what one has.

The common theme statements reflect the attention to "self," such as "I am my body, therefore, what does my body need?" "How am I?" "How comfortably and successfully am I experiencing my body?" "What are my immediate physical needs and desires?"

The energy projected is described as "conserved energy" and is often experienced as "grounded," as if it were tightly contained around the body like a spiral coil. The energy is usually somber, heavy, and serious in nature, as if the person is attempting to function while carrying some great weight on his or her shoulders, and is thus conserving energy for later personal use.

The self-preserving types will "sacrifice for self" to insure survival. Rather than looking to the group or a mate to "solve problems," these types tend to "look inward" based upon an inherent recognition that "I'm on my own" and "I have to take care of myself."

Social/Anti-social
Social instinctual types are driven by the ongoing search for others, groups an/or community, akin to the herd instinct in animals, where there is safety and security in numbers. The focus of attention is on other as in "who is doing what and with whom," "my circle of friends," "the group" and "our greater world."

The primary desire is for others or groups, which is manifested by an imbalanced perceived need for people, recognition, popularity, honor, status, position and social acceptance. They tend to be paternal individuals that seek and suggest ways to be in the world and cooperate with or rebel against social norms. They may be social or anti-social.

The concerns of the social types involve issues of relating to others - for example, "to relate or not to relate" or "how to relate." The survival strategy places an intense emphasis on either sociability or unsociability. The focus is on tracking multiple others and whether are important or unimportant and if they are a potential friend or foe.

The common theme statements reflect an inclination to categorize oneself in terms of others, such as "I am my position with respect to others or society, therefore, what do I need to do to fit in?" "Who should I be with?" "Who am I with, are they important?" "How comfortably and successfully am I experiencing my group?" "How am I perceived by the others or the group?"

The energy projected is described as "split energy" and is often experienced as "scattered" and projected outward, appearing personable, superficial, and cursory in nature. It is imperative that "a good impression is made" and that "nothing important is missed."

The social types will "sacrifice for their extended family or group" to insure status. Rather than looking inward or to a mate for security and to "solve problems," these types tend to "look outward," based upon a belief that "my value is dependent upon how I am perceived by others, society and/or the group." "We can make it if we all cooperate and work together."

Sexual/One to One
Sexual instinctual types are driven by the ongoing search for closeness, intimacy, pair bonding, connection and one-to-one relationships. The drive is especially representative of the masculine and feminine energies: the very qualities that determine the strongest and most desirable of mates. The focus of attention is on desirability and pairing as in "the beloved", "my special friend" and "our intimate world."

The primary desire is for a special mate, which is manifested by an imbalanced perceived need for connection, wholeness, affinity, and closeness in a continual search for "the other half." They tend to be highly charged and charismatic individuals that seek to create or reject intimacy.

The concerns of the sexual types involve issues of intimacy - for example, "to be intimate or not to be intimate" or "how to be intimate." The survival strategy places an intense emphasis on attraction and repulsion, with either abstinence or promiscuity. The focus is on developing and maintaining intimacy and the bond needed or a secure attachment.

The common theme statements reflect an inclination to define oneself in terms of the mate and the intimate relationship, such as " I am my intimate relationship, therefore, what does my relationship need?" "Who am I to you? " "What do I mean to my special other?" "How connected am I to my intimates?" "How comfortably and successfully am I experiencing my intimate relationship?" "Are we deeply bonded?" "How am I perceived by my intimate partner?"

The energy projected is described as "high energy" and is often experienced as "intense" and laser-like, appearing to be intently focused, and is usually playful and light, yet penetrating in nature. There is a sense of energy and vibration, the search for the mate, the need to display their strength and beauty, like the peacock showing its feathers.

The sexual types will "sacrifice for the relationship" to insure connection. Rather than looking inward or to the group for security to "solve the problem," these types tend to "look to the mate," based upon a belief that, "I cannot be whole and complete unless I find my other half." "It is you and me against the world. "

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How is this true for you?