User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 54

  1. #1
    Senior Member VagrantFarce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,557

    Default Yet Another (!) Look at the Instincts

    Reading, bored at work, feel like sharing:

    http://www.awarenesstoaction.com/dow...s_melody_3.pdf

    Quote Originally Posted by Mario Sikora
    The Self-Preservation Instinctive Bias (Nesting and Self-Nurturing)

    All instincts, in some way, serve the interest of self-preservation, and this category is really a cluster of elliptical instinctive behaviors that resulted in sensitivity regarding matters of nesting and self-nurturing. It is not an instinctive drive to “self-preserve.” If “self-preservation” where the order, people of this instinctive bias would not binge eat, consume junk food, smoke, or do any physical activities that could lead to harm.

    Put another way, people in this category are especially sensitive to stimuli relating to safety, nesting, and self-nurturing. This sensitivity comes from the biological structure of their brain and central nervous system. This biological structure is shaped by their physical and mental experience interacting with the expression of their genes. A focus on safety, nesting, and nurturing are elliptical servants in the greater cause of self-preservation. These matters take up more of their mental energy and they are more likely to execute instinctive, automatic behaviors that serve these needs. It is not that they have instincts that others don’t; it is that they are more sensitive in these matters and more likely to demonstrate the instinct.

    For example, I have a Social instinctive bias. As I write this I am sitting in a Starbucks and there is an air vent blowing on me. I have been sitting here for over two hours and just noticed that I am cold. My wife, who has a self-preservation bias, would have noticed the draft the moment she satdown, not because she is cognitively focused on it or psychologically compelled to stay warm, but because she has biological sensitivities that push her to pay particular attention to and address temperature regulation.

    For those who think that these drives are consciously cognitive, ask yourself this: Do I think about shivering, or does it just happen? Do I will my teeth to chatter? Do I consciously cross my arms and rub my shoulders when chilled, or do I just do it? Natural selection has designed us to address our instinctive needs by mechanisms in our brain, sometimes referred to as “modules,” that function below the level of consciousness. As our initial mechanisms prove unsatisfactory, the need is pushed up the ladder of cognitive awareness. For example, the rub of the shoulders is more conscious than the chattering of our teeth, but not as conscious as getting up to adjust the thermostat. It is the movement up and down this “ladder of cognitive awareness”—mixed with our patterns of applying the strategies we discussed in the last month’s article—that provides us with the opportunity to “work” with our instinctual biases.

    Those with a self-preservation bias (SPs) tend to be, like Goldilocks in the children’s story, sensitive to physical comfort and compulsively seeking chairs, beds, clothing, temperatures, etc. that are “just right.”

    They are also highly sensitive to potential illness or threats to their health. They constantly monitor their well-being, noticing aches and pains, oncoming colds or stomach aches, and so on. This sensitivity allows them to head off threats to their health.

    SPs are generally focused on their “nest.” They want things in their home to be ordered specifically: comfortable, safe, and well-supplied. Those supplies can also include “enough” money in the bank; comforting, home-related hobbies; and memorabilia or knick-knacks with calming, sentimental associations.

    Notice, that these sensitivities or focuses of attention don’t directly “cause” self-preservation; they inspire automatic behaviors that, by acting elliptically, ensure our preservation. In a sense, stocking our nest and nurturing our physical well-being are universal behaviors that lead to increased chances of survival.

    Contradictions

    We see contradictory behavior in each of the instinctive biases. For example, the SPs often exhibit some form of binging, whether it is binging on food, shopping for clothes, buying decorations for the house, etc. These binges occur due to “modular dissonance.” “Modules” are thegroupings of neurons and synapses that link together and govern specific functions and responses to a given stimulus. Modules don’t always coordinate with each other and sometimes create competing needs or desires. Thus our SP might have a drive to be financially conservative competing with a drive to splurge on, say, artwork for the house or enough blankets to survive the next ice age. Both of these superficially conflicting drives are based on instincts that elliptically support “self-preservation”—conserving resources and “feathering the nest.”

    We tend to become frustrated with ourselves over such conflicting urges because we see them as a lack of will power or some sort of moral failing. This is the “language of the fall” that I wrote about in Part I of this series. If we understand these conflicts for what they are—very natural modular dissonance rooted in evolutionary drives—we stand a greater chance of resolving them and changing behavior.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario Sikora
    The Social Instinctive Bias (Orienting to the Group)

    In Enneagram circles, this instinct bias is often viewed as a desire to be part of a group, surrounded by people, or even a drive to adapt to the group. That is only a part of the story.

    Humans are social animals. Our survival depends on complex interactions with a high number of our fellow species members. This may be due to the fact that humans have few natural defensive tools—we are not very strong or fast compared to our traditional predators, and we do not have sharp teeth or claws with which to defend ourselves. Being part of the pack heightened our chances of survival (it’s the lone antelope that gets eaten by the lion).

    So, yes, part of the social instinctive bias is a blind drive to move toward the group. But, our high sociability enabled another survival advantage to our hunter-gatherer ancestors: a focus on reciprocity.

    Here is an example of the value of reciprocity: When I have a good hunt and end up with more food than I can eat, I will share it with you in the expectation that when I come home empty-handed you will share a meal with me. But I must have mechanisms to ensure reciprocity, some guarantee that you will hold up your end of the bargain. I do this by keeping track of who acts reciprocally and who doesn’t. If I feed you today but you neglect to share with me later, you get crossed off my list of worthy recipients of my future largesse. Further, I am going to let the rest of the group know that youare a not to be trusted and I will compare notes with them on who else I should avoid.

    The larger the group is, the more complex the reciprocity-monitoring mechanisms must be. In a group of 100 to 150 (the size of a typical hunter-gatherer tribe) I must constantly take stock of others’ trustworthiness, build mutually beneficial relationships, and establish my own reputation as a worthy addition to the tribe who will gladly repay you on Tuesday if you share your bounty with me today.

    People with a Social instinctive bias have a heightened sensitivity to stimuli associated with social relationship, causing these stimuli to take up more of their mental energy and resulting in increased instinctive behavior in this area.
    Socials like to be around people because: they like gossip (the information by which we know who is safe to trust), they like to observe people so they can continue to improve their understanding of human nature, they desire to ensure that the group’s mores and standards are followed, they strive to manage the group’s perception of them (i.e., their reputation and status), etc.

    Modular dissonance also leads to seemingly contradictory behavior, who are often alternately sociable and private, introverted in some situations and extroverted in others. This in part relates to the image management element of the category. If one of my goals is to manage my reputation by influencing your perception of me, I will only show you what I want you to see, exposing myself in some ways and holding back in others.Once again, the so-called “social instinct” is not a specific drive to be part of the group or to adapt to the group. It is a plethora of instincts that increase our chances of survival by improving our ability to remain an accepted member of the group and monitor the behavior of others in the group so we will know who to trust and improve our chances of being trusted by others. This trust ultimately ensures safety and, thus, survival.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario Sikora
    The Sexual Instinctive Bias (Attracting and Mating)

    Sometimes referred to as a “one-to-one” instinct, this category is easily misunderstood. To understand it better, we must bear in mind the elliptical nature of evolution. This category is not simply an instinctive drive toward one-to-one relationships, it is a cluster of interrelated instinctive behaviors that serve the purpose of attracting attention to ourselves and improving our chances of mating (in the sense of “pairing” rather than necessarily “reproducing”).

    The “attracting-attention” element actually serves two purposes: it not only improves your chances of having sex, it helps you survive. For example, the child who draws attention to itself (by being charming, flamboyant, self-assertive, etc.) gets more attention from parents and others. More attention increase survival rates. (A perfect example of the survival benefits of the sexual instinctive bias is Scarlett O’Hara in “Gone with the Wind.” She was gifted at getting people to pay attention to her and then charming them so she could bend them to her will when she needed to.)

    The “mating” element provides other survival benefits. Pairing with a significant other in adulthood gives us someone to care for us when we are ill, boost our spirits when we are down, share the burdens of daily existence, etc.
    The “display” element of the Sexual subtype is often overlooked in the literature, but people with this subtype have a drive to make people notice them. They may accomplish this by dressing for attention, acting seductively, being extraverted, spending more time on their appearance than others, become performers of some sort, etc.

    Yes, Sexuals often seek intense relationships, but on an instinctive level the relationship is not for its own sake, it is to improve chances of sexual reproduction or survival by pair bonding.

    One of the significant contradictions sometimes seen in Sexuals is promiscuity, serial relationship, or extra-relationship flirtation. One module pushes to bond, while another pushes to seek fresh stimulation. Thus, Sexuals often feel conflicted in relationships—much in love but feeling like there must be something more.
    People with this instinctive bias also inadvertently send what appear to be mixed messages to others: certain (often unconscious) behaviors say “come hither” while the rational mind says “I’m not actually interested.”
    I'm digging the way this guy thinks - read the article for more, as well as his website (http://mariosikora.blogspot.com/p/articles.html).
    Hello

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    MBTI
    me
    Posts
    234

    Default

    I know i've hit a sexual when we are both pushing and pulling so subtly I feel that only we would conceive what's happening... it's like a dance... a test... so secret only those with the right 'spirit' can recognise. This is my way of rubbing up against people... do they dance like me? can they dance with me? do I just have to use one look to make a loud statement so softly only their ears can pick up the vibrations?

    Anyway, I think it's cool to refer to the opposing poles of each instinctual subtype, and in each dominant subtype, you'll probably see the most "contradictory" and oppositional tension.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Silveresque's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,280

    Default

    Thanks for posting these! This is confirming Sp/So for me again. Could I actually have gotten my variant right for once? *gasp*

  4. #4
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    Enfp
    Enneagram
    497 sx/so
    Socionics
    IEE Fi
    Posts
    14,657

    Default

    I like this post as well..its an interesting view on my sx-dom, and a great confirmation. It's also interesting to see where the conflict between so-doms and sx-doms comes from then.
    ★ڿڰۣ✿ℒoѵℯ✿ڿڰۣ★





    "Harm none, do as ye will”

  5. #5
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,939

    Default

    I often feel that the sp descriptions focus too much on physical security. I do tend under certain circumstances to worry about physical safety (and sometimes I notably worry more than others, I know), but I worry more about emotional safety.

    But perhaps that's being sp/sx, the concern about emotional self-preservation while also very much wanting to make strong intimate connections? Although I have wondered too if I may be sp/so...

    I'm also not particularly sensitive to things like food, temperature, etc. In fact, I tend to be more relaxed than average about those.

    Some sp-first type 6 descriptions pinpoint the "emotional safety" thing and that strikes more of a chord with me.
    Female
    INFJ
    Enneagram 6w5 sp/sx


    I DOORSLAMMING

  6. #6
    Undisciplined Starry's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    5,625

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopelandic View Post
    I know i've hit a sexual when we are both pushing and pulling so subtly I feel that only we would conceive what's happening... it's like a dance... a test... so secret only those with the right 'spirit' can recognise. This is my way of rubbing up against people... do they dance like me? can they dance with me? do I just have to use one look to make a loud statement so softly only their ears can pick up the vibrations?

    Anyway, I think it's cool to refer to the opposing poles of each instinctual subtype, and in each dominant subtype, you'll probably see the most "contradictory" and oppositional tension.
    I feel this kind of thing with others as well. Does this mean I'm a sx? I'm seriously asking.

  7. #7
    brainheart
    Guest

    Default

    Good information. confirms sx/sp for me.

    One thing- I'd say I get extroverted when I'm attracted to someone, or want to attract someone, otherwise I kind of repel people- making myself less attractive, avoiding eye contact, etc. But I'm always on the look out for potential future mates, ' just in case'. This isn't conscious; I'm just always noticing. It's probably the main reason why I avoid socializing or working outside the home, to resist temptation and keep my marriage intact. So now I also tend to focus my infatuation on the completely unattainable (a particular famous musician). I know I need to figure out a better solution, but that's how it is for now.

    How do other sx-doms who are in relationships deal with this?

    Another question- are people with sx-second less likely to be tempted, more likely to be focused on the relationship they are in? Want the bond and be satisfied when they get it?

  8. #8
    now! in shell form INA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    intp
    Posts
    3,198

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SilkRoad View Post
    I often feel that the sp descriptions focus too much on physical security. I do tend under certain circumstances to worry about physical safety (and sometimes I notably worry more than others, I know), but I worry more about emotional safety.
    This.
    Several descriptions of the sp variant suggest a "princess and the pea" or Goldilocks approach. And that's fine, but it seems to dominate the descriptions while other forms of safety are given short shrift. Securing physical safety and personal space is a concern, and I am hypervigilant about health. Once those are taken care of, however, I'm not that ornery about other physical comforts. Mental and emotional space are the chief concerns then.
    hoarding time and space
    A single event can awaken within us a stranger totally unknown to us. To live is to be slowly born.
    — Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #9
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    8,193

    Default

    I expect biases towards physical vs. cerebral vs. emotional space, and health, are going to be contingent on how the individual identifies their self to begin with. If one identifies oneself as "I am my mind" their sp instinct could manifest as protecting that, whereas physical concerns are there, but secondary.



  10. #10
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    I expect biases towards physical vs. cerebral vs. emotional space, and health, are going to be contingent on how the individual identifies their self to begin with. If one identifies oneself as "I am my mind" their sp instinct could manifest as protecting that, whereas physical concerns are there, but secondary.
    Ooh, good point.

    That would make sense as far as me being INFJ and a 6, as well as sp-first.

    It's weird about the physical safety thing; in some ways I'm kinda blase (walking home alone after dark etc, sometimes a bit carelessly), but I can get really paranoid about the possibility of food poisoning just before I travel (afraid of being stuck on a plane deathly ill - probably also cause I have a flying phobia); being in countries where the traffic is crazy, the drivers are crazy and there are no seatbelts (though I can adjust after a couple of days in that environment); etc.

    I can be very phobic at times and very fearless at others, but that fits with being 6.
    Female
    INFJ
    Enneagram 6w5 sp/sx


    I DOORSLAMMING

Similar Threads

  1. A simpler way to look at the cognitive functions
    By BlackCat in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 07-21-2012, 03:48 PM
  2. Another way of looking at the attitudes (abstraction and empathy)
    By Eric B in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-17-2011, 10:42 PM
  3. [Inst] Another look at the instincts
    By VagrantFarce in forum Instinctual Subtypes
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 09-15-2011, 03:46 PM
  4. "Look at the world from the plant's perspective"
    By Tantive in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-04-2010, 09:25 PM
  5. Another way of looking at the functions
    By VagrantFarce in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-09-2009, 06:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO