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  1. #61
    Senior Member the state i am in's Avatar
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    i identify with sx/sp more than sp/sx. i crave self-expression and intense communication too much. i need it or i start to get weary.

  2. #62
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Eight (8) stacks

    Sexual/Self-pres


    This subtype is a very charismatic. They have a very assertive energy and they demand attention. The lust of the Eight combines with the sexual instinct to make one of the most fiery of the combinations of all of the enneatypes, especially if Seven is the dominant wing. Sexual/self-pres Eights aren’t afraid to tell you what they think. The "can do" attitude that the other subtypes have is now intertwined with an outward passionate storm of energy. The sexual/self-pres Eight will be similar to the self-pres/sex Eight with respect to interests and attachment to close friends and family, but the intensity level is augmented. Since the sexual instinct is first, these Eights usually don't let an opportunity pass by to connect with those they find interesting. They can sense the power in any situation and they like to challenge people. They can enjoy making others react to them, keeping others on their toes, to find out what makes them tick. They are likely to use humor to accomplish this. When sex/self-pres Eights are unbalanced, they are very quick to anger and have a difficult time controlling their impulses.
    Not exactly highly descriptive, but sure.

  3. #63
    nevermore lane777's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackCat View Post

    sp/sx

    These people often have an earthy, mysterious quality to them. They are quietly intense, but to others may seem oblivious to the greater social world around them, instead favoring personal interests. They are slow to commit, but once they do it is with an attitude of life commitment, to the establishment of an impermeable bond. Others can be taken aback by how suddenly and completely this type can lock into them, and by the depth of understanding of the other's condition. They attach to others at an organic, root level, in contrast to the other subvariant's surface formality. Somewhat hesitant to enter new relationships, they instead preserve the select few enduring bonds they carefully form along the way. The sanctuary of home is of paramount concern, and this type takes particular delight in decorating their spaces to reflect their cherished sense of taste and depth. Depth and discrimination characterize this stacking.

    Motivation: to live in a secure, comfortable environment where they can pursue their private interests in depth.

    Familiar Roles: the mate, the mystic, the quiet supporter.

    Examples: George Harrison, Jackie Onassis, Eric Clapton, Emily Dickinson
    +1

    I used to think I was sp/so when I studied the variants separately. But going by your combination's, I definitely fit the sp/sx description most.
    To die would be an awfully big adventure - Peter Pan

    INFJ ~ 4w5 sp/sx ~ RLOAI ~ Inclusion e/w=1/0 (Melancholy Compulsive) Control: e/w=0/6 (Supine) Affection: e/w=4/0 (Phlegmatic Melancholy)

  4. #64
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    At this point in my study of personality theories, I cannot help but think that a person's life experiences, especially those during formative years (birth to age seven) contribute to the finite selection of personality types traits available to them via genetic inheritance.
    I agree, environment triggers genetic/inborn potential.

    The largest influences of my life:
    1. My dad's alcoholism and all the bad family dynamics that came from it.
    2. Being exposed to and raised in conservative Christianity tradition from a very young age.
    3. Living in the middle of rural PA with barely anyone else my age around.

    I was always very very shy (I would hide being furniture when guests came to the house), and I was so quiet that my parents didn't even know I knew how to read until my kindergarten teacher told them once I started attending school. #1 and #3 above contributed to that.

    I was very T in my perceptions but #1 and #2 really drove a wedge between my inner T nature and my expressed mask. Thinking outside the boundaries and challenging status quo is not acceptable in alcoholic families and strict religions, and I could not avoid the instability... not just because I was a child, but because I was a shy child and because I had nowhere else to go. Only my very very close friends got to hear my rational view of the world; meanwhile, everyone else got the demure well-behaved considerate ISFx style child. (My mom -- the only stable person in my family despite her codependency issues -- is ISFJ, and I consider the religious environment I was raised in to be very ISxJ in nature.) I developed a lot of rigorous judgments religiously, though, and felt trapped in a box most of my life with no way out; the things I was being taught didn't make sense to me in some ways, but I kept blaming myself and thinking maybe I just didn't "get it" and kept trying. (Another factor, there, then, that influenced development.)

    I was always curious, but became even moreso -- it was all I had. I read voraciously and otherwise spent my time exploring the fields and terrain around my home.

    A lot of my life was thus bent into exploring the world, alone, and writing about what I had learned since my social skills were so inadequate and/or fake, to me. Felt even lonelier.

    A lot of this got fixed in the last 5 years or so and I finally feel like I do resemble more my "natural" me -- an introvert who immensely likes people but is quickly drained by them, a thinker with empathy and a learned language of social interaction, an intuitive who is trying to keep her feet on the ground and accomplish things in the tangible world.

    But that early part of my development twisted and bent me and made me rely too much on some of my natural traits. Life experience, early on, really does impact what traits are developed and how much.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  5. #65
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Yes traits and type are an important distinction. I think Enneagram is actually more about actual behavioral traits (actions) and MBTI about cognition (thoughts).

  6. #66
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I agree, environment triggers genetic/inborn potential.

    The largest influences of my life:
    1. My dad's alcoholism and all the bad family dynamics that came from it.
    2. Being exposed to and raised in conservative Christianity tradition from a very young age.
    3. Living in the middle of rural PA with barely anyone else my age around.

    I was always very very shy (I would hide being furniture when guests came to the house), and I was so quiet that my parents didn't even know I knew how to read until my kindergarten teacher told them once I started attending school. #1 and #3 above contributed to that.

    I was very T in my perceptions but #1 and #2 really drove a wedge between my inner T nature and my expressed mask. Thinking outside the boundaries and challenging status quo is not acceptable in alcoholic families and strict religions, and I could not avoid the instability... not just because I was a child, but because I was a shy child and because I had nowhere else to go. Only my very very close friends got to hear my rational view of the world; meanwhile, everyone else got the demure well-behaved considerate ISFx style child. (My mom -- the only stable person in my family despite her codependency issues -- is ISFJ, and I consider the religious environment I was raised in to be very ISxJ in nature.) I developed a lot of rigorous judgments religiously, though, and felt trapped in a box most of my life with no way out; the things I was being taught didn't make sense to me in some ways, but I kept blaming myself and thinking maybe I just didn't "get it" and kept trying. (Another factor, there, then, that influenced development.)

    I was always curious, but became even moreso -- it was all I had. I read voraciously and otherwise spent my time exploring the fields and terrain around my home.

    A lot of my life was thus bent into exploring the world, alone, and writing about what I had learned since my social skills were so inadequate and/or fake, to me. Felt even lonelier.

    A lot of this got fixed in the last 5 years or so and I finally feel like I do resemble more my "natural" me -- an introvert who immensely likes people but is quickly drained by them, a thinker with empathy and a learned language of social interaction, an intuitive who is trying to keep her feet on the ground and accomplish things in the tangible world.

    But that early part of my development twisted and bent me and made me rely too much on some of my natural traits. Life experience, early on, really does impact what traits are developed and how much.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    Yes traits and type are an important distinction. I think Enneagram is actually more about actual behavioral traits (actions) and MBTI about cognition (thoughts).
    Excellent clarifications...
    --------------------
    Type Stats:
    MBTI -> (E) 77.14% | (i) 22.86% ; (S) 60% | (n) 40% ; (T) 72.22% | (f) 27.78% ; (P) 51.43% | (j) 48.57%
    BIG 5 -> Extroversion 77% ; Accommodation 60% ; Orderliness 62% ; Emotional Stability 64% ; Open Mindedness 74%

    Quotes:
    "If somebody asks your MBTI type on a first date, run". -Donna Cecilia
    "Enneagram is psychological underpinnings. Cognitive Functions are mental reasoning and perceptional processes. -Sanjuro

  7. #67
    Senior Member BlahBlahNounBlah's Avatar
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    I can have a difficult time trusting people who seem to have a primary social variant. It's not easy to feel connected to them. I don't feel like we're involved for the sake of the involvement itself but as part of some bigger plan they have or something.
    I have a vagina.


    ENTP . 7w6 sx/sp

  8. #68
    Shaman BlackCat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlahBlahNounBlah View Post
    I can have a difficult time trusting people who seem to have a primary social variant. It's not easy to feel connected to them. I don't feel like we're involved for the sake of the involvement itself but as part of some bigger plan they have or something.
    I'm like this too. Pretty much exactly. In the real world I really just don't trust/care for social mains, it's like this weird feeling that I need to get away from them. It's like "ehhh stop talking to me... please..." but I don't want to say that. Lol.

    Bolded is important to me too. I get involved with people just to talk and bond with them, I really enjoy it. I don't really feel the need to socialize just to socialize, it's usually to get closer to the people or maintain the bonds that I have. When I'm picking someone to get to know I'm considering long term implications, usually. But this doesn't mean I'm not talkative, I'll talk to people just to talk to them, and I'll have a fine time doing it, but I won't feel the need to continue with it just because we had a fun time talking. I need to be comfortable with making a bond with that person.

    Hopefully that all made sense.
    () 9w8-3w4-7w6 tritype.

    sCueI (primary Inquisition)

  9. #69
    Senior Member WoodsWoman's Avatar
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    Ah. sp/sx. So now 4w5 sp/sx is what I identify with the most.

  10. #70
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
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    Think I'm sp/sx. Possibly sp/so, but definitely self-pres first. It probably doesn't come across on here because I don't talk about my biggest concerns directly, but I'm ridiculously sp dominant.

    My upbringing:

    Everyone in my immediate family was entirely uninterested in religion. I wouldn't say I was 'raised to be non-religious' though, that suggests it was made an issue at all. I was first exposed to religious belief at school and my family only shared their views when I asked.

    I was never short of attention until at least the age of six. There was always someone around who'd have time for me. All the adults I was ever around were playful, friendly, encouraging and affectionate with children. A few were stricter than others, but I was well bonded with them all and so wanted to please them with or without disciplinary threats. I did sometimes throw tantrums and get smacked, but I don't remember what about. I do remember that I would be genuinely out-of-control angry or upset, I wasn't throwing them for attention or to get my own way. I didn't have much contact with other children until I went to school, and I didn't enjoy their company much. They weren't horrible to me, I just found them too unpredictable and immature and didn't like having to learn these new rules of interaction, and often the most domineering characters would want to be my friend because I was so unassertive. I did make a few friends I liked a lot though, even loved deeply by age 8.

    The strong self-preservation instinct, if caused by anything I've experienced, probably comes from the fact that by far the most distressing problems I've had have been made better and often solved by myself, because they weren't ultimately any kind of interpersonal relationship problems and no one else could help at that time. It's become habitual, then, for me to focus primarily on aspects of my well-being that aren't about satisfaction in my relationships to individuals or society. I don't find these needs anywhere near as pressing, except where they threaten my self-pres needs. I'm scared of being without practical support I might need, but emotional support and advice I feel able to mostly offer myself, even though I do feel a lot of affection for some people.

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