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Thread: Wine!

  1. #81
    Senior Member bronte's Avatar
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    I love that first glug of a glass of wine after a crappy day at work! Currently drinking either pino grigios, zinfandels or chiantis - thanks folks - your posts have made my mouth water and given me some ideas for new treats! Sod the old liver!
    I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
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  2. #82
    Free-Rangin' Librarian Jae Rae's Avatar
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    Taltarni Brut Tache

    Just had some of this lovely sparkling wine: lovely salmon color, hint of berries and a honey scent, but not sweet. Delicious with turkey. Wonderful for a holiday dinner with toasting.

    Review here:

    Tara Q. Thomas: Taltarni Brut Taché, about $20


    Imported by Clos du Val, sometimes available at Costco and BevMo.
    Proud Female Rider in Maverick's Bike Club.

  3. #83
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Midget View Post
    My friends from Calgary brought some White Zinfindel when they came to visit...they put ice in it. I was apalled. :p
    That's an appropriate presentation of white zinfandel. Treat it like Kool-Aid, and keep your expectations low.

  4. #84
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    My reason always given for not drinking a white zin is that I went through my jungle juice phase in college, I no longer have a need for kool-aide with alcohol in it!

    I DO love a good red zin though- it's a lot of flavor in a glass
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  5. #85
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    I DO love a good red zin though- it's a lot of flavor in a glass
    Amen, sister... preach it!

  6. #86
    Oberon
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    About red wine... I took my wife to Chili's on Friday for a meal, and as part of my new food discipline I ordered the margarita grilled chicken (marinated grilled chicken breast on a bed of rice and black beans, with fresh pico de gallo and a house salad on the side) and a glass of house cabernet. The house cab was Beringer, almost as ordinaire as vin gets... but they charged me six bucks a glass for the stuff. My two glasses with dinner would have bought me the whole bottle at the grocery store, with change.

    Of course, theirs probably came from a box...

  7. #87
    Senior Membrane spirilis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    About red wine... I took my wife to Chili's on Friday for a meal, and as part of my new food discipline I ordered the margarita grilled chicken (marinated grilled chicken breast on a bed of rice and black beans, with fresh pico de gallo and a house salad on the side) and a glass of house cabernet. The house cab was Beringer, almost as ordinaire as vin gets... but they charged me six bucks a glass for the stuff. My two glasses with dinner would have bought me the whole bottle at the grocery store, with change.

    Of course, theirs probably came from a box...
    On the other side of the spectrum, there's the local Hanover area where it's no small feat to get a liquor license, so this one recently-opened italian restaurant stresses their BYOB policy. I found it slightly amusing seeing an older guy sitting at his table alone examining the bottle of wine he just drank before putting the bottle back in its paper bag.
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  8. #88
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    I actually LIKE BYOB policies if I can see the menu first- then I can get a much better deal on the wine and insure that I'll have something that I WANT to drink instead of having to settle for something on the wine list!

    and on the note of wines and derivatives, I loathe most brandies- I just had a few pours of a couple this evening- it made me wish to vomit from it's pure cardboard + everclear flavor (though a good armagnac is a lovely thing!)
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  9. #89
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
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    It's interesting to notice that most of you, when you talk about wines, are rather refering to the cépage (grape variety), when I would rather think to the terroir first.

    In the US, in Australia or in Chile, wines are usually produced in industrial quantities, on very wide surfaces, so there's only a minimal thought about the exact location where the wine has been produced. Yet the nature of climate and soils are of extreme importance.

    In France, we would not say "it's a red cabernet", or "it's a zinfandel"... but rather "it's a Bourgogne", "it's a Medoc", "it's a Côtes du Rhône"... and so on.

    The terroir says a lot more: its taste, how it has been "vinifié", it's far more precise. The same grape variety, when grown on different soils can produce tremendously different wines, especially in quality.
    There are awful, undrinkable Bordeaux. And there are incredible Bordeaux too. Sometimes, the difference between the two is only a hill, a micro-climate, or a nearby stream.

    When you taste a french wine, you taste the land where it has been invented, or carefully selected.

    So far my favorites are red Bourgogne [red burgundy] from the Côtes de Beaune area, up to the Côtes de Nuit. Gevrey-Chambertin, le "Bonnes Mares" in the Chambolle-Musigny AOC, Vosne-Romanée, Pommard, Aloxe-Corton... et caetera...
    Those fabulous names are poetry for my palate, my nose and my ears!

    There are deep, complex wines that are bathed with the morning light (little limestone hills exposed to the east), and a little dessicating effect because of the southern winds directly coming from Mediterranée through the Rhône and Saône valleys..
    They should reach maturity after 5 or 10 years.

    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

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  10. #90
    Oberon
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    Yes, buying wine according to the soil and local climate is better.

    I am not at present capable of doing this is any kind of informed manner, which can of course change, but there it is. I suspect that any sort of serious study into this subject will end my days of buying wine at the local grocery store...

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