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  1. #11
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    Coffee grounds are not only crack for earth worms and draw them from afar (high carbon content). But they also blend perfectly with your garden soil. Dump at will your plants will thank you for it.

  2. #12
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    haven't tried these but we always did store shredded cheese in the freezer, and my mom does the milk thing, I don't drink milk so i don't even keep it in my fridge

    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chthonic View Post
    Coffee grounds are not only crack for earth worms and draw them from afar (high carbon content). But they also blend perfectly with your garden soil. Dump at will your plants will thank you for it.
    As an added bonus, if you own fruit trees, try putting the coffee grounds into the soil as the fruit ripens. When the trees get their caffeine buzz and begin shaking, the vibrations will drop the fruit right on the ground, so you don't have to climb up and pick it!

    Seriously, never heard this. I wonder if it would work for people looking for night crawlers to go fishing with /days of yore>.
    "Love never needs time. But friendship always needs time. More and more and more time, up to long past midnight." -- The Crime of Captain Gahagan

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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by grey_beard View Post
    Seriously, never heard this. I wonder if it would work for people looking for night crawlers to go fishing with /days of yore>.
    Possibly if you have a worm farm and are breeding them. Worms love carbon, that's why they flock to rotting carboard and will eat egg cartons too. Coffee grounds are mostly carbon. If you're looking for fishing bait, lay some cardboard on bare earth, keep it moist and after a few days if you lift it up, worm city.

    I just starting brewing kombucha tea again. The downside is the damn alien things reproduce every batch. What the hell do you do with a load weird pancakes that look like they might jump on your face in the night and lay eggs in your stomach? Apparently you pop them in the blender, add to your watering can and dump them on your garden as fertiliser. Whole lot better idea to me than making.....kombucha jerky out of them.

  5. #15
    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    Use small pet cages with the bottom taken off to protect small potted plants from accidents in a busy yard.

    I had to do this for my bonsai to protect it from basketballs and dogs and the neighbor kids. I took a rabbit cage and removed the bottom and wired it to my table with my bonsai inside. The cage has a white rustproofing on it so it isn't too ugly and my little tree is protected and still gets the right amount of sun and rain. I hate to have it in a cage but they destroyed my potted moss gardens I was growing so there was no way I'd let that happen to my baby bonsai.

  6. #16
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chthonic View Post
    I just starting brewing kombucha tea again. The downside is the damn alien things reproduce every batch. What the hell do you do with a load weird pancakes that look like they might jump on your face in the night and lay eggs in your stomach? Apparently you pop them in the blender, add to your watering can and dump them on your garden as fertiliser. Whole lot better idea to me than making.....kombucha jerky out of them.
    Wait what? I thought that the slimy pancake parts were the things that you were trying to grow and what kombucha is made out of, i mean that is the "mushroom". I remember seeing some documentary about kombucha years ago when it wasnt popular yet, i think it was one of the first people who grew it commercially in usa and those slime pancakes were what they tried to get and what they sent to people so that they could grow their own.
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  7. #17
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    Yeah the pancake is what makes the drink, but it's the liquid you consume. You need a mother to brew but they are long lived and every new batch of brew gives birth to another one. Before long you have 6 of the things in your brewing jar. They only die once in a while but they multiply every 2 weeks. I've been reading all the interesting things people do with their excess mothers. I don't fancy chopping one up and sticking it in my stirfry... It's bad enough that the one I have is creating CO2 like no-ones business and it gives the impression it's climbing out of the jar and moving around. They are quite gross to look at.

    But I do like the kombucha fizzy drink, so I have to pretend I don't have a lab experiment in my kitchen. I can't wait to go for second ferment, I've raspberries and ginger waiting to flavour it. So far it took 5 days to grow a mother from a commercial bottle of the tea. I then put that into a larger jar 2 days ago and it's already spawned a second larger one. I think my primary brew will be ready in 5 days (it's hot here at the moment), then you add flavours to it, second ferment another 2-3 days and you have fizzy drink with probiotics and very small amounts of sugar. Tastes a bit tart but I love the stuff.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chthonic View Post
    Yeah the pancake is what makes the drink, but it's the liquid you consume. You need a mother to brew but they are long lived and every new batch of brew gives birth to another one. Before long you have 6 of the things in your brewing jar. They only die once in a while but they multiply every 2 weeks. I've been reading all the interesting things people do with their excess mothers. I don't fancy chopping one up and sticking it in my stirfry... It's bad enough that the one I have is creating CO2 like no-ones business and it gives the impression it's climbing out of the jar and moving around. They are quite gross to look at.

    But I do like the kombucha fizzy drink, so I have to pretend I don't have a lab experiment in my kitchen. I can't wait to go for second ferment, I've raspberries and ginger waiting to flavour it. So far it took 5 days to grow a mother from a commercial bottle of the tea. I then put that into a larger jar 2 days ago and it's already spawned a second larger one. I think my primary brew will be ready in 5 days (it's hot here at the moment), then you add flavours to it, second ferment another 2-3 days and you have fizzy drink with probiotics and very small amounts of sugar. Tastes a bit tart but I love the stuff.
    Okay, but just so that you know:

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  9. #19
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    For gardening, save your eggshells. Collect a few of them before they dry out too much after cracking eggs, and crush them into irregular pieces. Sprinkle them along your greens-- like lettuce, cabbage, etc. It'll add calcium to the soil and prevents worms from traveling around and eating!

    FYI: Pay attention to the little critters eating your greens. Sometimes, they might be butterflies in baby form. Identify them carefully.
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  10. #20

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    My neighbor says I have a green thumb. For stronger plants and vibrant color, my secret is epsom salt (magnesium sulfate). Don't be shy, spread it generously around the base of plants and water in. Your garden will grow and your blooms will be gorgeous. In the spring, I do that weekly. I also mix some in a water bottle and spray on foliage in the evening.
    Likes spirilis liked this post

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