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  1. #11
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    Just learned that slugs live for 2 to 6 years

    Cool! Live long and prosper little guys.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  2. #12
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    Default the slug is a noble creature

    Did you know...

    ! Only 5% of the slug population is above ground at any one time. The other 95% is underground digesting your seedlings, laying eggs, and feeding on roots and seed sprouts.

    ! A slug’s blood is green.

    ! Most British slugs eat rotting vegetation, but a few are carnivorous.

    ! Slugs do play an important role in ecology by eating decomposing vegetation.

    ! A slug lays 20-100 eggs several times a year.

    ! Slug eggs can lay dormant in the soil for years and then hatch when conditions are right.

    ! Gastropods form the second largest class in the animal kingdom, the largest being the insects.

    ! Slugs are hermaphrodite, having both male and female reproductive organs.

    ! Slugs have been present in the British Isles since the end of the last ice age.

    ! In favourable conditions a slug can live for up to 6 years.

    ! A slug is ba*sic*ally a mus*cu*lar foot, and the name ‘gastropod’ literally means stomach foot.

    ! Un*like snails that hi*bern*ate dur*ing winter, slugs are act*ive whenev*er the tem*per*at*ure is above 5°C.

    ! A slug is es*sen*tially a snail without a shell.

    ! Slugs used to live in the ocean, which is why they still need to keep moist.

    ! One in*di*vidu*al field slug has the po*ten*tial to pro*duce about 90,000 grand*chil*dren.

    ! Brit*ish garden*ers use over 400 bil*lion slug pel*lets every year.

    ! It’s been es*tim*ated that an acre of farm*land may sup*port over 250,000 slugs.

    ! Re*search has shown that the av*er*age UK garden has a pop*u*la*tion of over 20,000 slugs and snails.

    ! A cu*bic metre of garden will on av*er*age con*tain up to 200 slugs.

    ! A slug’s slime en*ables it to glide without dif*fi*culty over glass shards, or even the edge of a razor blade.

    ! Slugs have the cap*ab*il*ity to re*pro*duce by them*selves, al*though a mate is pre*ferred.

    ! When picked up or touched, the Black Slug will con*tract into a hemi*spher*ic*al shape and be*gin to rock from side to side. This be*ha*viour con*fuses pred*at*ors.

    ! Slugs leave their own in*di*vidu*al scent trail so they can find their way home.

    ! A slug’s slime ab*sorbs wa*ter, which is why it’s nearly im*possible to wash it off your hands.

    ! A slug’s slime con*tains fibres which pre*vents it from slid*ing down ver*tic*al sur*faces.! A slug smells with its body.

    ! Bri*tain is home to around 30 spe*cies of slug.

    ! A slug can stretch out to 20 times its nor*mal length, en*abling it to squeeze through the smal*lest of open*ings.

    ! A slug has ap*prox*im*ately 27,000 teeth – that’s more teeth than a shark.

    ! Like sharks, slugs routinely lose and re*place their teeth.

    ! When a slug loses one of its sens*ory tentacles it grows an*oth*er, usu*ally with*in a few months.
    ok no idea where those asterisks came from, but i can't remove them all. i started and it was soul crushing. sorry for the eyesore.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  3. #13
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    I've never noticed this thread before.

    My wife hates slugs because she grew up in northern Cali where they had gianormous banana slugs. They've never bothered me too much. I like snails and keep them in my fish tank, although you gotta be careful or they will reproduce like crazy. The fish usually eat the babies though, so no big deal.

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    If I find earthworms, I usually toss them in our garden or our compost because they are awesome for soil. I remember reading in nat'l geographic that they aren't actually native to N. America but arrived on the british ships which delivered the first settlers to Virginia. Soil was used in the bottoms of ships to preserve ballast or buoyancy (I forget which).

    They're also not true worms. When I was a young child, I thought they were baby snakes, lol.

  5. #15
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    happy monday!

    here's some worm art.

    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  6. #16
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzy Conduit View Post
    If I find earthworms, I usually toss them in our garden or our compost because they are awesome for soil. I remember reading in nat'l geographic that they aren't actually native to N. America but arrived on the british ships which delivered the first settlers to Virginia. Soil was used in the bottoms of ships to preserve ballast or buoyancy (I forget which).

    They're also not true worms. When I was a young child, I thought they were baby snakes, lol.
    dude, lol. kids are hilarious.

    and that's really interesting about how they came here! freedom worms.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  7. #17
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzy Conduit View Post
    If I find earthworms, I usually toss them in our garden or our compost because they are awesome for soil. I remember reading in nat'l geographic that they aren't actually native to N. America but arrived on the british ships which delivered the first settlers to Virginia. Soil was used in the bottoms of ships to preserve ballast or buoyancy (I forget which).

    They're also not true worms. When I was a young child, I thought they were baby snakes, lol.
    I want that is I think it is really cool. I love facts like this. I might replace this with a pic that conveys my reaction better, but posting pics from phone is a bitch
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  8. #18
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    here's an article it. it's not known with certainty that the british were responsible:

    Jamestown - National Geographic Magazine

    Like many young English blades, Rolfe smoked—or, as the phrase went in those days, "drank"—tobacco, a fad since the Spanish had first carried back samples of Nicotiana tabacum from the Caribbean. Indians in Virginia also drank tobacco, but it was a different species, Nicotiana rustica. Virginia leaf was awful stuff, wrote colonist William Strachey: "poor and weak and of a biting taste." After arriving in Jamestown in 1610, Rolfe talked a shipmaster into bringing him N. tabacum seeds from Trinidad and Venezuela. Six years later Rolfe returned to England with his wife, Pocahontas, and the first major shipment of his tobacco. "Pleasant, sweet, and strong," as Rolfe's friend Ralph Hamor described it, Jamestown's tobacco was a hit. By 1620 the colony exported up to 50,000 pounds (23,000 kilograms) of it—and at least six times more a decade later. Ships bellied up to Jamestown and loaded up with barrels of tobacco leaves. To balance the weight, sailors dumped out ballast, mostly stones and soil. That dirt almost certainly contained English earthworms.

    And little worms can trigger big changes. The hardwood forests of New England and the upper Midwest, for instance, have no native earthworms—they were apparently wiped out in the last Ice Age. In such worm-free woodlands, leaf litter piles up in drifts on the forest floor. But when earthworms are introduced, they can do away with the litter in a few months. The problem is that northern trees and shrubs beneath the forest canopy depend on that litter for food. Without it, water leaches away nutrients formerly stored in the litter. The forest becomes more open and dry, losing much of its understory, including tree seedlings.

    Whether the night crawler and the red marsh worm actually first arrived on Rolfe's tobacco ships is not known. What is clear is that much of the northern forests in America were worm free until the Europeans arrived there, inadvertently importing earthworms on the root-balls of their plants or in the ballast of ships. The effects of this earthworm invasion have been slow to show themselves because the creatures don't spread rapidly on their own. "If they're born in your backyard, they'll stay inside the fence their whole lives," says John Reynolds, editor of Megadrilogica, the premier earthworm journal. But over time, the effect on the ecosystem can be dramatic.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    I want that is I think it is really cool. I love facts like this. I might replace this with a pic that conveys my reaction better, but posting pics from phone is a bitch


    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by five sounds View Post
    freedom worms.
    lol

  10. #20
    Senior Member RedAmazoneFriendZone's Avatar
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    http://youtu.be/lHrLdMXxm08

    "Vers à soie" or Silkworms can make (by hands) a nice pull-over for next winter.

    Biologic and happy to work for french fashion (with a hood of course)
    ALL THAT WE SEE OR SEEM TO BE IS BUT A DREAM WITHIN A DREAM

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