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Thread: Camping

  1. #1
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Default Camping

    I was thinking about, in the semi-distant future, taking a tour across the US and camping in different camp sites for the stays in different areas..

    Those who've traveled a lot, camped before, or really enjoy that sort of thing.. Any tips, recommendations, etc? Products that saved you, and stuff you took with you that ended up being useless? Packing lists you use? Anything I can't think of regarding discussing the subject?
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  2. #2
    Just a statistic rhinosaur's Avatar
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    Camping is all about *you*. What I mean is that nobody can really give you perfect advice because it's all about what you like and what you want to take, and only your own personal experience can determine that. I tend to go the minimalist route, but some people tow those big trailers behind their trucks and call that camping. On backpacking trips, my stepdad takes about twice as much weight as I usually like to carry, but he likes his super hot mega ultraburner stove.

    Car camping, bike camping, hitchhiking, or walking? If you're going car camping you can take whatever you want: Big kitchen style tents, chairs, folding tables, big two-burner propane stoves, heavy food, etc.

    • Tent or no tent? If car camping, I'd either take a tent or would just sleep in the back of my truck. Otherwise, I'd probably just bring a tarp. If you use a tarp, bring some string to make a structure. Bring poles too if you will be in an area without trees-- trekking poles double as hiking sticks.
    • You will need a sleeping pad and a sleeping bag. If you use a tarp, and have trees, you can use a hammock, but those can get cold.
    • You will probably want to take something to boil water. I use a homemade alcohol stove that has lasted for years.
    • Food is mostly personal preference, but some things keep better in coolers than other things.
    • Headlamp!
    • Water filter. Even if you stay at the kinds of campgrounds with running water, the drinking water at most campgrounds tastes horrible.

  3. #3
    Just a statistic rhinosaur's Avatar
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    Camping is all about *you*. What I mean is that nobody can really give you perfect advice because it's all about what you like and what you want to take, and only your own personal experience can determine that. I tend to go the minimalist route, but some people tow those big trailers behind their trucks and call that camping. On backpacking trips, my stepdad takes about twice as much weight as I usually like to carry, but he likes his super hot mega ultraburner stove.

    Car camping, bike camping, hitchhiking, or walking? If you're going car camping you can take whatever you want: Big kitchen style tents, chairs, folding tables, big two-burner propane stoves, heavy food, etc.

    • Tent or no tent? If car camping, I'd either take a tent or would just sleep in the back of my truck. Otherwise, I'd probably just bring a tarp. If you use a tarp, bring some string to make a structure. Bring poles too if you will be in an area without trees-- trekking poles double as hiking sticks.
    • You will need a sleeping pad and a sleeping bag. If you use a tarp, and have trees, you can use a hammock, but those can get cold.
    • You will probably want to take something to boil water. I use a homemade alcohol stove that has lasted for years.
    • Food is mostly personal preference, but some things keep better in coolers than other things.
    • Headlamp!
    • Water filter. Even if you stay at the kinds of campgrounds with running water, the drinking water at most campgrounds tastes horrible.

  4. #4
    WALMART
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    rhinosaur's post is good.

    -toilet paper
    -flashlight
    -knife (preferably multi-tool)
    -flint/magnesium/lighter
    -cookware/utensils
    -bedding
    -provisions for the duration of your stay


    then there's a lot of accessory stuff, i like lugging my bike around with me where ever i go. my dad has a pop-up trailer, which is awesome, and my grandpa owns an RV. it's all about what you plan on doing out in the wild!

    Forever the scout motto: Be Prepared.

  5. #5
    Temporal Mechanic. Lexicon's Avatar
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    My ISTP former roommate and I were planning on doing this epic bicycle tour from our apt in Louisiana back up to New England [following some Underground Railroad trails] when he got outta the Army. Unfortunately at that point both of us were too physically messed up to follow through. However, he did find a ton of useful information about like ultra lightweight gear - clothes, bedding, tents, dishes, bags. Also ultra durable if you don't mind spending a little extra. Increases mobility a ton. He'd surfed bicycling forums for this sort of information. I know you didn't mention how you'd be traveling to camp, but the simpler/lighter the better for any hikes you may have, and so on.

    I'll try to get that information from him sometime soon, and link it here. I can't remember the specific stuff/brands right now.

    I imagine MRE's would be good to have on you, but that shit's gross.
    and depending on where you'll be exploring, water purification tablets are always a plus.
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  6. #6
    Riva
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    I'm 25 years old this year but has never done camping in my life. If I believe I would enjoy it I would have done it. It had never occurred to me as fun though. Then again I'm from South Asia and camping is not a popular activity, therefore has rarely heard of how enjoyable it is. If I have had heard more stories....

    @Geoff, @93JC and @Vasilisa like camping they've mentioned. The former does it the most I believe. Such beautiful sceneries he camps in. Makes me feel so jealous!

    Vas probably takes her crystal tea cups with her on camping trips. Hehe....... *Imagines*

  7. #7
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    It does totally depend on what sort of camping you want to do. I can't add a whole lot to what rhinosaur mentioned.

    I've only car-camped and backpacked in. Car-camping is a bit nicer, because I have a larger tent for that and I don't have to worry about weight/what I bring along nearly as much. BUT you don't have the wilderness component, most of the time, and even if you do, it's just not as nice as there are a lot of other people about. Backpacking in takes a lot more thought around what to take, and the weight component.

    With either option, a good sleeping bag, mat, and pillow are essential (i.e. all three need to be things that work for you and that you're actually able to sleep in)... there are heaps of products out there, but I can recommend the three I happen to use. Also, headlamp. Water filter essential for packing it in. Food, cooking gadgets, etc will depend on what sort of camping you're doing.

    Note: A lot of this gear isn't cheap. Consider it a lifelong investment.
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  8. #8
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    In many national forests and wilderness areas, you can camp for free if you don't stay in a campground. But, you also generally have to camp far enough back to be out of site of any roads. You'd probably want to be out of site anyway. In some areas, you'd want to be careful not to be near growers or other drug activity like smuggling. Keep an eye on the large mammal hunting seasons for the area.

    It sounds like you'll be changing sites every day or two. Bring as little as possible. Things you bring have to be organized, packed, cleaned, found, and repacked. Discovering how little you really need to live is part of the fun.

  9. #9

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    It really depends on what kind of camping you want to do and how light you want to pack. If you're going to be staying at developed campgrounds with plumbing where you drive in and park at your campsite, the list is very different from if you're going to be camping in a national park or a less developed area. If you want to think about that, I think people can give you much better answers. I think the one thing I would add that I haven't seen mentioned is a good supply of matches in a waterproof case. They've saved me before.
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  10. #10
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    Also, thinking you can roll into a national park and camp the day-of (same goes for some national forest sites) is not a given, as there can be waiting lists / a lot of people camp. Especially on weekends.

    As an example (and I'm sure you won't be targeting this area, but just to illustrate the issue), there's one public natl forest/ camping area outside of Aspen, CO, with a set number of sites in it, and from summer through end of camping season, it's fully reserved 4-6 months in advance (I think it was posted somewhere that this is the case for all days, but for sure weekends are solidly booked months in advance).
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