User Tag List

First 5678917 Last

Results 61 to 70 of 325

  1. #61
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PeaceBaby View Post
    Enjoyed your update.



    Should I be telling you "GO FOR IT!"
    I wish I could trust enough to buy without surveying, but alas I cannot. I have to wait until I get home to actually do a hard buy on anything. I need to see it all for myself. If the soil is no good for farming, or it floods easily, or its too heavily wooded, there's no way.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  2. #62
    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    IS??
    Socionics
    InFj
    Posts
    525

    Default

    This sounds very exciting and I wish you well… Here are some things to consider for what it is worth (and in no particular order):

    Your ability to purchase the land is separate from your $30,000 for the structure?

    Are you looking for an eventual re-sale? Avoid “quirky” designs and details. I have a good friend who did the geo-dome thing and had a hell of a time selling it. I lived in an “A” frame and that was frustrating as heck (you only have two flat walls to put furniture against and the heat in the peaked loft was excruciating) but people seem to like to buy them because they’re cute. You will invest large amounts of time and capital in this however you do it so try to increase your chances of getting a return.
    Don’t do the mobile home…you will never get your investment back (been there) you’d have to pin your financial hopes on the land gaining value. Additionally some areas zone them out….and even the best ones are built like crap. Just say no. No, no, no, no.

    Depending on where the lot is….there’s the survey, the “perk” test (drainage) installing a legal driveway for access (you need to be able to deliver the home to your site), running power from the road into your site and then running the power from that pole to your home and service box (you’d probably be best served by a 100 amp… I had one run recently for $750.00)…..septic tank and its drain field (unless you are near to sewer….but you still have to run a connection to the sewer) Heating? You will have to have a gas line run to the site as well….you can do all electric but wow the cost at least up in the Midwest is considerable. Confronting this can really take the wind out of your sails, but it is just a hoop that must be jumped through. If you buy a kit home or pre-fab the distributer should be able to give you an idea of these costs from their past experiences…..and to that end ask for the contact info of other customers in your area so you can speak directly to them about their experiences with the housing and set-up.

    Of all your options the cabin seems the most practical in that it is the most expandable, able to take modification. And, it can be built up on posts just as a conventional deck is (as long as your zoning approves it). A deck can be made very strong for relatively little $$$ compared to pouring a foundation or block work.
    Critters…. It is termite country down there, right? So if you build on posts or pilings use the right material and techniques to discourage the little bastards. You can pour concrete pilings and assemble your deck on those (they make fixtures for this).

    A skylight is a hole in your roof. Yes the extra light is nice. But it is a hole. A big hole and expensive.
    Habitat for Humanity has (at least up here) the Habitat re-store, a shop where salvaged building materials are available for purchase….door, windows, cabinets, etc. But in a big town there should be a number of salvage companies.

    There are some great books on wiring out there and you can do most of this yourself and then have an Licensed electrician come in at the end to check it over and do the hook-up to your circuit box. You’ll usually need a larger amp circuit for your dryer and oven (if you go electric). Seems like you live in a sunny area so when you can afford it you could retro fit solar onto your home. Also if you have favorable weather most of the year your porch or deck can become a quite nice extension of your living room or kitchen.

    Sounds like you’ve got plumbing covered as far as the household fixtures. You may want to consider an option that lets you divert Grey water (from showers and dishes) into your landscape for use. When you buy a water heater you will get what you pay for, the cheaper ones lasting about ten years (which can be influenced by the quality of your water). Do you have need for heating down there or is it tolerable all year round? Air-conditioning? Either way good insulation and “Energy Star” rated doors and windows (properly installed) would be prudent.

    Will you want to have pets? Where will they be kept or exercised?

    Use the best materials possible for your roof. Everything you own is under it. I like metal standing seam which is expensive up front but will last well in excess of 50 years.
    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings...Steal a little and they throw you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a king

  3. #63
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hirsch63 View Post
    This sounds very exciting and I wish you well… Here are some things to consider for what it is worth (and in no particular order):

    Your ability to purchase the land is separate from your $30,000 for the structure?
    Yes, definitely. If I end up getting this civilian contracting job, my house will delay being built just for another year because I will still be gone, and I may end up with an extra 10k in my hand from it too, but otherwise this is what Im looking at for my house.

    Are you looking for an eventual re-sale? Avoid “quirky” designs and details. I have a good friend who did the geo-dome thing and had a hell of a time selling it. I lived in an “A” frame and that was frustrating as heck (you only have two flat walls to put furniture against and the heat in the peaked loft was excruciating) but people seem to like to buy them because they’re cute. You will invest large amounts of time and capital in this however you do it so try to increase your chances of getting a return.
    Im not really looking for a resale. I want this to be cheap enough that I don't mind not getting my money back from it. A yurt or a dome would mean I could relocate it, so it isn't a big deal, and I can repurpose them into guest houses as well. My hobbit house is quirky, no doubt about it, but I won't plan on giving it up either.

    Don’t do the mobile home…you will never get your investment back (been there) you’d have to pin your financial hopes on the land gaining value. Additionally some areas zone them out….and even the best ones are built like crap. Just say no. No, no, no, no.
    I really want to avoid them. I don't think I can talk my parents out of one yet, but I think I found some log cabins that may peel them away from it all, but the problem is that there isn't much we can afford. Buying land is harsh enough, pile a house on it too and we're looking at maybe 50k$ allowed for a house.. That isn't much. Basically, my parents need to be able to easily pay all of their bills on my dad's retirement check. It isn't much. We haven't seen many housing options outside of mobile homes that allow for that. It isn't really an investment on the home we're looking at, so much as just a place to live where we aren't sinking and struggling to swim.

    Depending on where the lot is….there’s the survey, the “perk” test (drainage) installing a legal driveway for access (you need to be able to deliver the home to your site), running power from the road into your site and then running the power from that pole to your home and service box (you’d probably be best served by a 100 amp… I had one run recently for $750.00)…..septic tank and its drain field (unless you are near to sewer….but you still have to run a connection to the sewer) Heating? You will have to have a gas line run to the site as well….you can do all electric but wow the cost at least up in the Midwest is considerable. Confronting this can really take the wind out of your sails, but it is just a hoop that must be jumped through. If you buy a kit home or pre-fab the distributer should be able to give you an idea of these costs from their past experiences…..and to that end ask for the contact info of other customers in your area so you can speak directly to them about their experiences with the housing and set-up.
    Yeah, this is all stuff I've been told I'd need to go through in this.. I'm ready for it, even though itll be a pain. Something about it is exciting to me though. I'd rather find a cheaper plot of land that I add everything to myself so I know it's done right and has what I need.

    Of all your options the cabin seems the most practical in that it is the most expandable, able to take modification. And, it can be built up on posts just as a conventional deck is (as long as your zoning approves it). A deck can be made very strong for relatively little $$$ compared to pouring a foundation or block work.
    Yeah, if I went with an option like that I'd have to ensure I put the small house next to where we plan on having our outdoor kitchen assembly so it could serve as a guest house when I get back home, and just a temporary living space/storage shed while I'm there.

    Critters…. It is termite country down there, right? So if you build on posts or pilings use the right material and techniques to discourage the little bastards. You can pour concrete pilings and assemble your deck on those (they make fixtures for this).
    It is, as a matter of fact. I didnt know that.

    A skylight is a hole in your roof. Yes the extra light is nice. But it is a hole. A big hole and expensive.
    Habitat for Humanity has (at least up here) the Habitat re-store, a shop where salvaged building materials are available for purchase….door, windows, cabinets, etc. But in a big town there should be a number of salvage companies.
    I suppose it is. I was looking at that for building some of the buildings we need on the land--the barn, and the small lean-to greenhouse for the seedlings and such with old windows.

    There are some great books on wiring out there and you can do most of this yourself and then have an Licensed electrician come in at the end to check it over and do the hook-up to your circuit box. You’ll usually need a larger amp circuit for your dryer and oven (if you go electric). Seems like you live in a sunny area so when you can afford it you could retro fit solar onto your home. Also if you have favorable weather most of the year your porch or deck can become a quite nice extension of your living room or kitchen.
    Interesting things to think about. It is sunny 90% of the time in Texas.

    Sounds like you’ve got plumbing covered as far as the household fixtures. You may want to consider an option that lets you divert Grey water (from showers and dishes) into your landscape for use. When you buy a water heater you will get what you pay for, the cheaper ones lasting about ten years (which can be influenced by the quality of your water). Do you have need for heating down there or is it tolerable all year round? Air-conditioning? Either way good insulation and “Energy Star” rated doors and windows (properly installed) would be prudent.
    We were just talking about a dual-septic system for that since I want to put a sprinkler system in a quarter acre of the land where we intend on putting the garden. And Texas weather is HOT with mild winters, A/C is a must (people die without it literally ) but in winter we tend to just use a fireplace and bundle up for most of it.

    Will you want to have pets? Where will they be kept or exercised?
    We plan on just keeping a few barn cats around for mice and rodents, but otherwise we have a few lazy house dogs. Not well exercised, they don't really like to, they just sit around and get fat and cuddle. Although I think the one tiny dog will LOVE having more room to run around in, she's young still.

    Use the best materials possible for your roof. Everything you own is under it. I like metal standing seam which is expensive up front but will last well in excess of 50 years.
    I'll have to google that, I've never heard of it!

    You said some awesome advice here.

    The main purpose for this land is to give my parents a final place to retire, and settle down.. the house they aim to get isn't really made for doing much besides being a place for them to rest finally, so I'm not too worried about the investment--people forget you're paying for a place to live. It's no different than paying for an apartment, I don't much worry about seeing the money back. It'd be nice, but not at all necessary. I don't see much options for them in terms of housing outside of a mobile home if they want to keep their payments under $500 a month for house and land.

    The purpose of my tiny house is to give me a place to live that is paid off, that I don't have to worry about, and after this next year hopefully doing contracting work I'll have no payments outside of utilities, I can just relax, finish my degree, and if I CHOOSE to work after that it'll be purely for the purpose of traveling and making a career I enjoy.

    I think my hobbit home can become my first option if I intend on doing things this way.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  4. #64
    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    IS??
    Socionics
    InFj
    Posts
    525

    Default

    Mobile homes are built with lightweight materials to make moving them cheaper...so your cabinets would be made of particle board, the faucets are made of plastic, etc.....and they are very sensitive to water damage from without and especially from within (broken plumbing connections, don't ask how I know...) from the poor installation of "PEX" tubing. You know because of your occupation you're used to living with substantial compromise(and without creature comforts)....not everyone is.... and besides after your service you deserve at least a few amenities. Perhaps you should save yourself at least one big indulgence like the skylight (no not really) or great flooring or a really decent oven/range if you enjoy cooking, etc.
    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings...Steal a little and they throw you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a king

  5. #65
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hirsch63 View Post
    Mobile homes are built with lightweight materials to make moving them cheaper...so your cabinets would be made of particle board, the faucets are made of plastic, etc.....and they are very sensitive to water damage from without and especially from within (broken plumbing connections, don't ask how I know...) from the poor installation of "PEX" tubing. You know because of your occupation you're used to living with substantial compromise(and without creature comforts)....not everyone is.... and besides after your service you deserve at least a few amenities. Perhaps you should save yourself at least one big indulgence like the skylight (no not really) or great flooring or a really decent oven/range if you enjoy cooking, etc.
    Hmm.. I hadn't thought about long term costs on it all.. I figured we'd be established enough to take on whatever lies ahead by then. So what do you suggest? We were looking at around $50k for a house for my parents.. Whats a viable affordable option that lends much more support? Granted, my parents want to move in the first place to get a bigger home that will accommodate the grandchildren, larger family get-togethers, etc. We live in 1400 sq. ft with 4 bedrooms (ick..), we were looking at 15-1600 sq. ft in that ball park with three bedrooms.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  6. #66
    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    IS??
    Socionics
    InFj
    Posts
    525

    Default

    Well 1600 sf is about a 60 foot double wide... I don't know what those are going for new....If you're ordering it you can at least specify the quality of the components. If they own the land already great. If not you are obviously in for all the costs to prep the site the same as if you were to build. I suppose if you were very vigilant about maintenance and do your homework on problems that have been reported on the model they would buy. For example the one I had was sheathed in a remarkably crappy form of siding/wallboard which loved to swell up, distort and rot. Yay. Turns out there were numerous class action lawsuits about the flaw...the payout would not have been enough to reside a quarter of the structure. What fails in the plumbing is not the PEX itself but the elbows and tees used to join lengths of the tubing together...they are made of plastic and they fail...In my case the hot water line from the water tank....It had 360 degrees from which to select the direction of the powerful stream of hot waterit would emit, most of that 360 was down towards the soil underneath the home, but no....it sprayed right up into my crappy particleboard flooring which swelled up to a remarkable degree totally wreaking the bathroom... it was an expensive repair. It's just all the little things that whack you but if you know that going in and prepare yourself as well as securing the very best home insurance you can afford (again, lots of research) you should be as well off as anyone could reasonably expect. And they need to be leveled every year even if they're on good concrete pads. I don't know of any standard housing option that could give you as much square footage and amenities for the price. Unless you buy the proverbial "fixer-upper" in a low cost area probably rural. But it sounds like your family is handy and if they all commit to pitch in it could work.
    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings...Steal a little and they throw you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a king

  7. #67
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hirsch63 View Post
    Well 1600 sf...
    Sounds like upgrading the establishment from the get-go and buying/requesting some things myself like upgraded plumbing fixtures could save me a lot of heartache later on. I love reading things like this, what went wrong, and how to prevent it from happening in the future. If you have anymore tips on it all I'd love to hear it.

    I haven't found anything myself that could give us what we need for the price either, which is why my parents have decided on a trailer. Even a log cabin is looking at 60-70 range easily for the same square footage. Container housing seems awesome, but I can't help but think that it is a lot more work for the same price and sq. ft. My father can build houses from the ground up, he knows everything there is to know about it, but he's sick and doesn't have the stamina anymore for things like that. I need this as low stress on them as possible.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  8. #68
    figsfiggyfigs
    Guest

    Default

    This is obviously a non-serious post.
    but LOOKEY!!!

  9. #69
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YWIR View Post
    This is obviously a non-serious post.
    but LOOKEY!!!

    [Insert best picture ever here.]
    .. I must have it!! Omg!! *Tucks this picture away into inspirational schemes..*

    Found some new contenders.

    $30,000. That's how much, with transportation and everything, an 8x40 container living unit would cost me.

    http://www.globalportablebuildings.com/Ultimate.html

    Bathrooms installed and ready to go, everything electrical is set up, and container living units are easy to expand on, upgrade, and they're extremely resilient. There's even a storage area on the back area of the house for things I don't use often. Also, no foundation required. I could simply build a deck around it if I wanted to have something more inviting. A lot more high quality materials in this assembly for around the same cost as a small trailer home.

    In a pinch for a home, this one would be ready in a snap and would last me a very long time for the money. And I could have it for much cheaper going with the smaller option of the two.

    http://www.globalportablebuildings.c...hure121106.pdf

    Coming in at $35,000 for the entire package, installation, upgrades, and everything is this Kanga pre-fab house. $5,000 more for a slightly bigger, more breathable space with modern elements.
    Pros: Everything would be installed, operating, and functional immediately. Also, the company is based in the state within which I live.

    At 336 sq. ft, it's modern looking, convenient, and ready to go.

    http://www.kangaroomsystems.com/14x24-modern-studio/

    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  10. #70
    Member Ava's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    MBTI
    ISxJ
    Enneagram
    6 sp
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Great idea and good luck with it!

    Have you read any books by Lester Walker? He's an architect and he's written several books on tiny houses and how to build them. Here's his A Little House of My Own: 47 Grand Designs for 47 Tiny Houses

    At least it might be a good source for ideas.

Similar Threads

  1. The Madmin Blog
    By Haight in forum Official Decrees
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 01-19-2013, 05:40 AM
  2. Tumbleweed Houses [The Tiny House company]
    By swordpath in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-28-2010, 09:48 PM
  3. Should I start a blog?
    By niffer in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-02-2007, 12:02 PM
  4. The Great Blog Transplant - Sign up now!
    By cafe in forum Official Decrees
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 04-28-2007, 10:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO